Dec 13, 2016

5 Things to Consider When Planning Your 2017 Content

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According to a recent research report by the Content Marketing Institute, Sixty-two percent of B2B marketers say their organization’s overall approach to content marketing has been much more successful now versus last year. Attributed to this success are two factors: doing a better job with content creation (85%) and developing or adjusting their content marketing strategy (72%). As we approach 2017, are you adequately preparing your content to drive more results? Here are five things to consider when planning your 2017 content:

  1. Carefully analyze your 2016 data and derive insights that you can use for 2017. Which channels performed the best? Was there a specific content topic or thought leader that you can correlate to spikes or dips in your analytics? Also take into account the timing of the content you published in 2016 – was there a high-performing month, day of the week, or time of day that particularly resonated? Replicate what caused those spikes, and remove content initiatives that didn’t hit the mark.
  2. Take into account emerging channels. By now, you’re well aware of the tried and true channels: emails, direct mail, phone, search, review sites, social media, press releases, website and blogs. Which of those channels receive the greatest response rate from your content? Is there a network that has been dwindling in engagement or response? That may mean that your community is migrating to another network. Look at new social media networks, apps or even events. What about influencers – are you utilizing those relationships as a channel to share brand messages that may resonate more? This channel is proving to be one of marketing’s most popular tactics today.
  3. Look outside the norm, especially when it comes to dates and events. Using an editorial calendar to map out your content strategy can help ensure that what you’re distributing will be as effective as possible. Once you’ve planned content around your usual seasons or holidays, start researching events, milestones or even months that celebrate causes that may relate to your brand. For example, if you’re a women’s health brand, you’d want to plan content around Breast Cancer Awareness month, or if you’re a non-profit that helps the homeless or displaced, you may want to run a campaign in February because it’s National Canned Food Month.
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  4. Leave slots to remain agile during trending events. Seasoned, well-oiled marketing machines can plan several months or even an entire year of content in advance. For most though, this is a hard reality, especially if you’re a brand that’s interested in harnessing trending events. It’s a good idea to leave a little breathing room in case there’s a trending story that as a brand you can use to leverage your content. In order to do so, you’ll need to map out in advance what the teams and roles are in order to execute swiftly. Leveraging trending content can help garner more awareness, conversation and interest.
  5. Look at new forms of content. If you didn’t test and trial new forms of content in 2016, it’s time to do so now. Examine what other brands or competitors may be doing, especially ones that you admire. Are they doing livestreaming through Facebook Live? How about GIFs or interactive content? Make sure you’re taking into consideration any data that hints at what type of content your audience digests the most, and keep in mind their dwindling attention spans.

Need more resources? Access our 2017 Interactive Editorial Content Calendar to start mapping your content strategy today!

(Photo Credit: Pixabay)

1 Comments on Blog Post Title


­ Drive Research 21:21 EST on Dec 14, 2016

Excellent thoughts here and I love that it starts with data. Many companies view their analytics at face value and are not giving the data the proper dive to understand how it can be used to drive strategy and next steps. So much can be learned from content analytics if you have the proper talent who knows how to dissect and interpret past content results. Thanks for sharing!

- George


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