American Heart Association: Your Pants May Help Size Up Your Heart Disease Risk

23 Sep, 2005, 01:00 ET from American Heart Association

    DALLAS, Sept. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- Knowing your pants size could help save
 your life.
     That's because your waist size is one way to estimate excess body fat,
 which is a significant risk factor for heart disease.
     Of course, using your pants size to help gauge your risk holds up only if
 your pants size matches your real waist size.  Here are the critical
 measurements according to the American Heart Association:
 
      *  If you're a man with more than a 40-inch waist, you're in risky
         territory.
      *  If you're a woman, your risk rises if your waist is more than
         35 inches.
 
     It may seem obvious that a larger waist could mean more risk for heart
 disease.  However, according to a "Shape of the Nations" survey by the World
 Heart Federation for World Heart Day, September 25, only 40 percent of
 Americans know that an oversized waistline is associated with increased risk.
     "Sixty-five percent of adults in this country are overweight, and almost
 one-third are obese.  This puts them at an increased risk for heart disease
 and stroke -- two of the leading causes of death among Americans," said Robert
 Eckel, M.D., president of the American Heart Association and professor of
 medicine in endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at the University of
 Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver.
     "The American Heart Association, as a global member of the World Heart
 Federation, supports World Heart Day and to make people aware what their waist
 size means for their overall heart health."
 
     The American Heart Association encourages you to reduce your risk for
 cardiovascular diseases by:
      *  Knowing your waist circumference.
      *  Asking your doctor about other risk factors, such as high blood
         cholesterol, high blood pressure and family history of heart disease.
      *  Taking actions to control risk factors with your doctor's help.
 
     "We are pleased World Heart Day is addressing the issue of obesity by
 educating people about the risk of a high waist circumference.  We all need to
 realize that a healthy weight and healthy shape can help reduce the risk of
 heart disease," Eckel added.
     If you're interested in making heart-healthy lifestyle changes, the
 American Heart Association offers you several free personal management tools,
 brochures and resources.  These include:
      *  The American Heart Association's No-Fad Diet: A personal plan for
         healthy weight loss book offers a variety of ways that can help people
         lose weight and keep it off.  It's available at bookstores nationwide
         and can be bought online.
      *  Healthy-Heart Walking, a popular CD.
      *  Choose To Move, a free 12-week program that helps busy women
         incorporate physical activity and healthy eating into their life.
      *  Web site content at http://www.americanheart.org on healthy eating and
         physical activity.
      *  Brochures and tips on how to incorporate healthy eating habits, even
         when eating out or on the go.
      *  A grocery-list builder that makes it easy to find heart-healthy foods
         when shopping.
 
     Use these tools and get more information about managing your risk factors
 for heart disease by visiting Americanheart.org or calling 1-800-AHA-USA1
 (1-800-242-8721).
 
 

SOURCE American Heart Association
    DALLAS, Sept. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- Knowing your pants size could help save
 your life.
     That's because your waist size is one way to estimate excess body fat,
 which is a significant risk factor for heart disease.
     Of course, using your pants size to help gauge your risk holds up only if
 your pants size matches your real waist size.  Here are the critical
 measurements according to the American Heart Association:
 
      *  If you're a man with more than a 40-inch waist, you're in risky
         territory.
      *  If you're a woman, your risk rises if your waist is more than
         35 inches.
 
     It may seem obvious that a larger waist could mean more risk for heart
 disease.  However, according to a "Shape of the Nations" survey by the World
 Heart Federation for World Heart Day, September 25, only 40 percent of
 Americans know that an oversized waistline is associated with increased risk.
     "Sixty-five percent of adults in this country are overweight, and almost
 one-third are obese.  This puts them at an increased risk for heart disease
 and stroke -- two of the leading causes of death among Americans," said Robert
 Eckel, M.D., president of the American Heart Association and professor of
 medicine in endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at the University of
 Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver.
     "The American Heart Association, as a global member of the World Heart
 Federation, supports World Heart Day and to make people aware what their waist
 size means for their overall heart health."
 
     The American Heart Association encourages you to reduce your risk for
 cardiovascular diseases by:
      *  Knowing your waist circumference.
      *  Asking your doctor about other risk factors, such as high blood
         cholesterol, high blood pressure and family history of heart disease.
      *  Taking actions to control risk factors with your doctor's help.
 
     "We are pleased World Heart Day is addressing the issue of obesity by
 educating people about the risk of a high waist circumference.  We all need to
 realize that a healthy weight and healthy shape can help reduce the risk of
 heart disease," Eckel added.
     If you're interested in making heart-healthy lifestyle changes, the
 American Heart Association offers you several free personal management tools,
 brochures and resources.  These include:
      *  The American Heart Association's No-Fad Diet: A personal plan for
         healthy weight loss book offers a variety of ways that can help people
         lose weight and keep it off.  It's available at bookstores nationwide
         and can be bought online.
      *  Healthy-Heart Walking, a popular CD.
      *  Choose To Move, a free 12-week program that helps busy women
         incorporate physical activity and healthy eating into their life.
      *  Web site content at http://www.americanheart.org on healthy eating and
         physical activity.
      *  Brochures and tips on how to incorporate healthy eating habits, even
         when eating out or on the go.
      *  A grocery-list builder that makes it easy to find heart-healthy foods
         when shopping.
 
     Use these tools and get more information about managing your risk factors
 for heart disease by visiting Americanheart.org or calling 1-800-AHA-USA1
 (1-800-242-8721).
 
 SOURCE  American Heart Association