Basketball Legends Earl 'The Pearl' Monroe and Walt 'Clyde' Frazier 'D-Up' for Diabetes and Heart Disease

Duo Double-Team for The Heart of Diabetes to Encourage People to Reduce Risk

of Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease



15 Dec, 2004, 00:00 ET from American Heart Association

    NEW YORK, Dec. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Thirty-one years have passed since New
 York Knicks legends Earl "The Pearl" Monroe and Walt "Clyde" Frazier -- a
 famed pro basketball "backcourt duo" -- last took to the court as NBA
 champions.  Now the two are teaming up again for the American Heart
 Association's The Heart Of Diabetes(SM): Understanding Insulin Resistance
 national campaign.
     The program helps educate people with type 2 diabetes about the
 cardiovascular risks associated with the disease, including African-Americans
 who are almost twice as likely to develop diabetes as other groups.
     Both Monroe and Frazier have a family history of type 2 diabetes.
 Monroe's father died from complications of the disease, and he, his brother
 and sister have all been diagnosed with it.  Frazier has many close family
 members with type 2 diabetes.  Diabetes is a major risk factor for
 cardiovascular disease, primarily heart disease and stroke.
     As spokespeople, Monroe and Frazier hope to motivate people affected by
 type 2 diabetes to become physically active and further modify their
 lifestyles to control the disease.  Many Americans, including African
 Americans, are aware of the risks associated with type 2 diabetes, but most
 people at risk have not taken the steps needed to improve their quality of
 life.
     Research has shown that patients working together -- whether exercising or
 watching what they eat -- can be more successful in making lifestyle changes.
 The Heart Of Diabetes suggests that program participants work with a friend or
 a "buddy" who can provide constant support and help ease the transition to a
 healthier lifestyle.
     "Having a teammate or a buddy around who is willing to make changes with
 you can go a long way," said Frazier.  "The Heart Of Diabetes will point you
 in the right direction, and your buddy will be there when the going gets
 tough."
     "Dealing with type 2 diabetes has been a part of my life for years, and
 watching what my father went through made me more aware of my own health,"
 said Monroe.  "I've worked hard with the people around me to stay active and
 develop healthy eating habits.  I know this program will help steer all people
 with type 2 diabetes in the direction of good health."
     The Heart Of Diabetes encourages people with type 2 diabetes to get
 regular physical activity, eat a healthy diet and manage their cholesterol
 levels to reduce associated risks and avoid developing cardiovascular disease.
 The program includes a variety of FREE tools, such as the Game Plan To A
 Healthy Life journal.  This journal contains a plan for physical activity in
 which people can also track glucose and cholesterol levels, weight and blood
 pressure -- all designed to help people make healthy choices every day.
     The Heart Of Diabetes offers several basic strategies that people with
 type 2 diabetes can adapt gradually, including:
 
     * Learning new strategies to help begin and increase regular physical
       activity
     * Increasing -- gradually -- the amount of time and intensity of their
       physical activity
     * Learning how to choose high-energy foods that work best for someone's
       diabetes plan
     * Finding new local opportunities and resources for physical activity
 
     The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of
 moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity at least five days a week for
 good health, a recommendation built into The Heart Of Diabetes.
     "There is a huge discrepancy between awareness and action among patients
 with type 2 diabetes," said Anjanette Ferris, M.D., of Columbia University
 College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, in
 New York City.  "A clear need exists for a program like The Heart Of Diabetes,
 which can empower people with the tools they need to make lifestyle
 modifications related to diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors including
 obesity, physical inactivity and hypertension (high blood pressure)."
     Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease affecting over 18 million
 Americans.  Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death for
 people with diabetes.  African Americans are almost twice as likely to develop
 type 2 diabetes as other groups, ultimately putting them at a greater risk for
 cardiovascular complications such as heart disease and stroke.  Overall, about
 11 percent of all African Americans have diabetes, but an estimated one-third
 of them don't know it.  Physical inactivity, a contributing factor in the
 development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is also more
 prevalent among older people, African Americans and Hispanics.
     People interested in participating in The Heart Of Diabetes program can
 call 1-800-AHA-USA1 or visit americanheart.org/diabetes.  Participants receive
 FREE materials, including the Game Plan To A Healthy Life journal and an
 educational brochure on diabetes, cardiovascular disease and insulin
 resistance.
 
     The American Heart Association's The Heart Of Diabetes(SM): Understanding
 Insulin Resistance is supported by an educational grant from Takeda
 Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company.
 
     About the American Heart Association
     Since 1924, the American Heart Association has helped protect people of
 all ages and ethnicities from the ravages of heart disease and stroke.  These
 diseases, the nation's No. 1 and No. 3 killers, claim more than 930,000
 American lives a year.  The association invested more than $407 million in
 fiscal year 2003-04 for research, professional and public education, and
 advocacy so people across America can live stronger, longer lives.
 
 

SOURCE American Heart Association
    NEW YORK, Dec. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Thirty-one years have passed since New
 York Knicks legends Earl "The Pearl" Monroe and Walt "Clyde" Frazier -- a
 famed pro basketball "backcourt duo" -- last took to the court as NBA
 champions.  Now the two are teaming up again for the American Heart
 Association's The Heart Of Diabetes(SM): Understanding Insulin Resistance
 national campaign.
     The program helps educate people with type 2 diabetes about the
 cardiovascular risks associated with the disease, including African-Americans
 who are almost twice as likely to develop diabetes as other groups.
     Both Monroe and Frazier have a family history of type 2 diabetes.
 Monroe's father died from complications of the disease, and he, his brother
 and sister have all been diagnosed with it.  Frazier has many close family
 members with type 2 diabetes.  Diabetes is a major risk factor for
 cardiovascular disease, primarily heart disease and stroke.
     As spokespeople, Monroe and Frazier hope to motivate people affected by
 type 2 diabetes to become physically active and further modify their
 lifestyles to control the disease.  Many Americans, including African
 Americans, are aware of the risks associated with type 2 diabetes, but most
 people at risk have not taken the steps needed to improve their quality of
 life.
     Research has shown that patients working together -- whether exercising or
 watching what they eat -- can be more successful in making lifestyle changes.
 The Heart Of Diabetes suggests that program participants work with a friend or
 a "buddy" who can provide constant support and help ease the transition to a
 healthier lifestyle.
     "Having a teammate or a buddy around who is willing to make changes with
 you can go a long way," said Frazier.  "The Heart Of Diabetes will point you
 in the right direction, and your buddy will be there when the going gets
 tough."
     "Dealing with type 2 diabetes has been a part of my life for years, and
 watching what my father went through made me more aware of my own health,"
 said Monroe.  "I've worked hard with the people around me to stay active and
 develop healthy eating habits.  I know this program will help steer all people
 with type 2 diabetes in the direction of good health."
     The Heart Of Diabetes encourages people with type 2 diabetes to get
 regular physical activity, eat a healthy diet and manage their cholesterol
 levels to reduce associated risks and avoid developing cardiovascular disease.
 The program includes a variety of FREE tools, such as the Game Plan To A
 Healthy Life journal.  This journal contains a plan for physical activity in
 which people can also track glucose and cholesterol levels, weight and blood
 pressure -- all designed to help people make healthy choices every day.
     The Heart Of Diabetes offers several basic strategies that people with
 type 2 diabetes can adapt gradually, including:
 
     * Learning new strategies to help begin and increase regular physical
       activity
     * Increasing -- gradually -- the amount of time and intensity of their
       physical activity
     * Learning how to choose high-energy foods that work best for someone's
       diabetes plan
     * Finding new local opportunities and resources for physical activity
 
     The American Heart Association recommends at least 30 minutes of
 moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity at least five days a week for
 good health, a recommendation built into The Heart Of Diabetes.
     "There is a huge discrepancy between awareness and action among patients
 with type 2 diabetes," said Anjanette Ferris, M.D., of Columbia University
 College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, in
 New York City.  "A clear need exists for a program like The Heart Of Diabetes,
 which can empower people with the tools they need to make lifestyle
 modifications related to diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors including
 obesity, physical inactivity and hypertension (high blood pressure)."
     Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease affecting over 18 million
 Americans.  Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death for
 people with diabetes.  African Americans are almost twice as likely to develop
 type 2 diabetes as other groups, ultimately putting them at a greater risk for
 cardiovascular complications such as heart disease and stroke.  Overall, about
 11 percent of all African Americans have diabetes, but an estimated one-third
 of them don't know it.  Physical inactivity, a contributing factor in the
 development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is also more
 prevalent among older people, African Americans and Hispanics.
     People interested in participating in The Heart Of Diabetes program can
 call 1-800-AHA-USA1 or visit americanheart.org/diabetes.  Participants receive
 FREE materials, including the Game Plan To A Healthy Life journal and an
 educational brochure on diabetes, cardiovascular disease and insulin
 resistance.
 
     The American Heart Association's The Heart Of Diabetes(SM): Understanding
 Insulin Resistance is supported by an educational grant from Takeda
 Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company.
 
     About the American Heart Association
     Since 1924, the American Heart Association has helped protect people of
 all ages and ethnicities from the ravages of heart disease and stroke.  These
 diseases, the nation's No. 1 and No. 3 killers, claim more than 930,000
 American lives a year.  The association invested more than $407 million in
 fiscal year 2003-04 for research, professional and public education, and
 advocacy so people across America can live stronger, longer lives.
 
 SOURCE  American Heart Association