Coke's Proposed ILO Study in Colombia Ignores Record of Worker Abuse Worldwide

Teamsters Call for Negotiated Global Agreement



Mar 10, 2006, 00:00 ET from International Brotherhood of Teamsters

    WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The International Brotherhood of
 Teamsters today charged that the proposed International Labour Organization
 (ILO) investigation and evaluation of labor relations and human rights
 practices at Coca-Cola (NYSE:   KO) bottling facilities in Colombia will not
 address egregious violations of workers rights throughout Coca-Cola's
 worldwide network.
     "This is Classic Coke corporate damage control that fails to confront and
 resolve these gross human rights violations," said Jack Cipriani,
 International Vice President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters,
 the world's largest Coca-Cola union. "This piecemeal approach doesn't protect
 the rights and safety of workers throughout the vast Coca-Cola system."
     An escalating campaign by students against Coca-Cola for its human rights
 violations forced colleges such as Rutgers, University of Michigan, and
 Hofstra to cancel lucrative contracts with Coca-Cola. The campaign, sparked by
 reports of murder, kidnapping and torture from Coca-Cola workers in Colombia,
 has inspired other workers to come forward with their experiences of workers'
 rights abuses in countries such as Guatemala, Turkey and the United States.
     "It's time that Coke stop studying their problems and start negotiating a
 global human rights agreement that will protect the rights and safety of all
 workers who produce, package, and distribute Coca-Cola products," said James
 P. Hoffa, General President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.
     The International Brotherhood of Teamsters represents 1.4 million
 hardworking men and women throughout the U.S. and Canada including more than
 18,000 Coca-Cola workers.
 
 

SOURCE International Brotherhood of Teamsters
    WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The International Brotherhood of
 Teamsters today charged that the proposed International Labour Organization
 (ILO) investigation and evaluation of labor relations and human rights
 practices at Coca-Cola (NYSE:   KO) bottling facilities in Colombia will not
 address egregious violations of workers rights throughout Coca-Cola's
 worldwide network.
     "This is Classic Coke corporate damage control that fails to confront and
 resolve these gross human rights violations," said Jack Cipriani,
 International Vice President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters,
 the world's largest Coca-Cola union. "This piecemeal approach doesn't protect
 the rights and safety of workers throughout the vast Coca-Cola system."
     An escalating campaign by students against Coca-Cola for its human rights
 violations forced colleges such as Rutgers, University of Michigan, and
 Hofstra to cancel lucrative contracts with Coca-Cola. The campaign, sparked by
 reports of murder, kidnapping and torture from Coca-Cola workers in Colombia,
 has inspired other workers to come forward with their experiences of workers'
 rights abuses in countries such as Guatemala, Turkey and the United States.
     "It's time that Coke stop studying their problems and start negotiating a
 global human rights agreement that will protect the rights and safety of all
 workers who produce, package, and distribute Coca-Cola products," said James
 P. Hoffa, General President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.
     The International Brotherhood of Teamsters represents 1.4 million
 hardworking men and women throughout the U.S. and Canada including more than
 18,000 Coca-Cola workers.
 
 SOURCE  International Brotherhood of Teamsters