Condoms Fail to Protect Against the HPV Epidemic, FRC Says; 'Because Condoms Give Users a False Sense of Security, They Actually Do More To Spread HPV Than Curb It,' Knight Says

Sep 22, 1999, 01:00 ET from Family Research Council

    WASHINGTON, Sept. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- "Only one percent of teens aged 15 to
 17 and adults aged 18 to 44 can name Human Papillomavirus (HPV) as a sexually-
 transmitted disease.  Yet, this disease infects an estimated 24 million
 Americans and is the cause of over 90 percent of all cervical cancer, the
 number two cause of cancer deaths among women," Family Research Council's
 Senior Director of Cultural Studies Robert Knight said Wednesday.  "So, why
 isn't the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) waging an aggressive public health
 campaign to educate Americans about this epidemic?  Why do Planned Parenthood
 and its allies give scant, if any, attention to the most prevalent STD in this
 country?  Condoms are powerless in protecting against HPV.  When this
 information gets out, the 'safe sex' fallacy will be exposed."
     On Wednesday, Family Research Council hosted a press conference on Capitol
 Hill to heighten awareness of HPV and condoms' ineffectiveness in stopping the
 spread of this potentially deadly disease.  Mr. Knight, basketball star A.C.
 Green, Rep. Tom Coburn (R-OK), abstinence educator Pat Funderburk Ware and Amy
 Holmes of the Independent Women's Forum challenged the CDC to collect data on
 HPV and to call for warning labels to be affixed to condom packaging.  During
 the event, FRC's new paper titled "The Human Papillomavirus Epidemic: Condoms
 Don't Work" was officially released.
     "When it comes to HPV, it doesn't matter how meticulously the condom is
 applied or the quality of the condom itself.  Condoms fail to protect against
 HPV because this disease is transmitted through regional skin contact," Knight
 said.  "Condom manufacturers should be required to disclose this information.
     "In addition, condom-pushing organizations like Planned Parenthood and
 SIECUS should cease spreading the lie that condoms are a 'safe sex method.'
 Safe sex is a myth, and the prevalence of HPV proves this," Knight said.  "The
 only effective way to avoid STDs is abstinence before marriage.  Instead of
 heeding Aaron Spelling's advice to make condoms visible on nightstands during
 programs like '90210,' we should emphasize responsible behavior and self-
 control. That's the only way the HPV epidemic will be stopped."
 
 

SOURCE Family Research Council
    WASHINGTON, Sept. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- "Only one percent of teens aged 15 to
 17 and adults aged 18 to 44 can name Human Papillomavirus (HPV) as a sexually-
 transmitted disease.  Yet, this disease infects an estimated 24 million
 Americans and is the cause of over 90 percent of all cervical cancer, the
 number two cause of cancer deaths among women," Family Research Council's
 Senior Director of Cultural Studies Robert Knight said Wednesday.  "So, why
 isn't the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) waging an aggressive public health
 campaign to educate Americans about this epidemic?  Why do Planned Parenthood
 and its allies give scant, if any, attention to the most prevalent STD in this
 country?  Condoms are powerless in protecting against HPV.  When this
 information gets out, the 'safe sex' fallacy will be exposed."
     On Wednesday, Family Research Council hosted a press conference on Capitol
 Hill to heighten awareness of HPV and condoms' ineffectiveness in stopping the
 spread of this potentially deadly disease.  Mr. Knight, basketball star A.C.
 Green, Rep. Tom Coburn (R-OK), abstinence educator Pat Funderburk Ware and Amy
 Holmes of the Independent Women's Forum challenged the CDC to collect data on
 HPV and to call for warning labels to be affixed to condom packaging.  During
 the event, FRC's new paper titled "The Human Papillomavirus Epidemic: Condoms
 Don't Work" was officially released.
     "When it comes to HPV, it doesn't matter how meticulously the condom is
 applied or the quality of the condom itself.  Condoms fail to protect against
 HPV because this disease is transmitted through regional skin contact," Knight
 said.  "Condom manufacturers should be required to disclose this information.
     "In addition, condom-pushing organizations like Planned Parenthood and
 SIECUS should cease spreading the lie that condoms are a 'safe sex method.'
 Safe sex is a myth, and the prevalence of HPV proves this," Knight said.  "The
 only effective way to avoid STDs is abstinence before marriage.  Instead of
 heeding Aaron Spelling's advice to make condoms visible on nightstands during
 programs like '90210,' we should emphasize responsible behavior and self-
 control. That's the only way the HPV epidemic will be stopped."
 
 SOURCE  Family Research Council