Eat'n Park Announces Shift to Trans Fat-Free Oil

Family Dining Chain on Leading Edge of Healthy Eating Trend;

Company Operates 10 Cleveland-area Locations



18 Aug, 2005, 01:00 ET from Eat'n Park Restaurants

    PITTSBURGH, Aug. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Eat'n Park Restaurants today announces
 it will replace its cooking oil for French fries, chicken, and other fried
 foods with trans fat-free oil to better meet the needs of today's guests.
     The move comes on the heels of a growing number of health experts who are
 concerned over the link between trans fat and a higher risk of heart attacks
 and increased cholesterol levels.
     To initiate the effort, Eat'n Park, which operates 10 restaurants in the
 Cleveland area and will soon add another in Elyria, Ohio, in fall 2005,
 partnered with the Center for Food Innovation at Penn State University to
 assess what manufacturer and fat-free product would best meet the company's
 cooking and taste requirements.
     After more than a year of research and testing, Eat'n Park selected trans
 fat-free canola oil from Cargill, Inc., which originates from canola seeds
 produced by Bayer Corp.  In addition to being trans fat-free, canola oil also
 has only one gram of saturated fat per serving - an added health benefit.
     According to Brooks Broadhurst, vice president of purchasing for Eat'n
 Park Hospitality Group, the switch to trans fat-free oil will provide guests
 with healthier food, as well as a fresh, cleaner taste.
     "We spent more than a year of research, development and testing to ensure
 we chose the highest quality product.  We found a canola oil that was able to
 meet our high standards for flavor while providing zero trans-fats and lower
 saturated fat," said Broadhurst.  "Our food will have a clean, fresh taste
 while delivering the health benefits of trans fat-free and lower saturated fat
 cooking."
     The move will be completed by late-September in all 79 restaurant
 locations across Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia, as well as among the
 Eat'n Park Hospitality Group's Parkhurst Dining Services and CURA Hospitality
 business units.
     According to Broadhurst, the 32 corporate, university and museum cafe
 venues served by Parkhurst Dining Services - three of which are located in the
 Cleveland area, including John Carroll University, American Greetings and
 National City Bank - are seeing this trend emerge because parents and young
 adults alike are interested in improving their health. And, corporate venues
 are seeking ways to provide healthier food for employees.
     CURA Hospitality, which serves senior living communities, also is making
 the switch because more dieticians and health officials feel it's necessary to
 reduce trans fat among all audiences, particularly older Americans.
     "Switching to trans-fat free is the right thing to do," said Broadhurst.
 "Eat'n Park is committed to a consistent dining experience for its guests and
 the move to trans fat-free oil helps fulfill that promise."
     Trans fat oil is the creation of partial hydration, an industrial process
 that changes the properties of oils used mainly for baking and frying. Over
 time, trans fats can raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol
 levels and, at the same time, reduce high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or "good"
 cholesterol levels.
     "Chains like Eat'n Park that switch to trans fat-free cooking oil are on
 the leading edge of providing healthy alternatives for guests," said Pete
 Bordi, Ph.D., associate professor, director, Center for Food Innovation, Penn
 State University.  "Plus, they are helping to address a growing concern in
 America about the dangers of heart disease and high cholesterol diets."
     According to Broadhurst, Eat'n Park's commitment to healthy eating
 includes a variety of Eat'n Smart menu selections with fewer calories, less
 cholesterol and a lower fat content. The chain also is popular among parents
 seeking healthy alternatives for children, including fresh fruit and the Kid's
 Soup and Salad Bar.
     Low carb dieters can select from a variety of Eat'n Park favorites
 offering low net carbs. The chain also participates in the National Restaurant
 Association's "Just Ask Us" program, which provides consumers information
 about healthy restaurant eating.
     Nutritional information for all menu selections can be found at
 www.eatnpark.com.
 
     The Eat'n Park Hospitality Group is a portfolio of foodservice concepts
 focused on personalized dining. Founded in 1949 as a carhop restaurant, today
 it has grown to include Eat'n Park Restaurants, Parkhurst Dining Services -
 the company's contract dining division, providing contract dining services to
 corporations, educational institutions, and cultural venues, and CURA
 Hospitality - providing contract dining and management service for senior
 living communities. For more information, guests are invited to visit
 www.eatnpark.com.
 
     Eat'n Park Restaurants is an award-winning family restaurant and bakery
 chain with 79 locations in three states with more than 8,000 team members
 company-wide. Eat'n Park's properties also include the Park Classic Diners,
 which are retro eateries reminiscent of the company's roots. The chain is a
 division of the Eat'n Park Hospitality Group based in Pittsburgh, Pa.
 
 

SOURCE Eat'n Park Restaurants
    PITTSBURGH, Aug. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Eat'n Park Restaurants today announces
 it will replace its cooking oil for French fries, chicken, and other fried
 foods with trans fat-free oil to better meet the needs of today's guests.
     The move comes on the heels of a growing number of health experts who are
 concerned over the link between trans fat and a higher risk of heart attacks
 and increased cholesterol levels.
     To initiate the effort, Eat'n Park, which operates 10 restaurants in the
 Cleveland area and will soon add another in Elyria, Ohio, in fall 2005,
 partnered with the Center for Food Innovation at Penn State University to
 assess what manufacturer and fat-free product would best meet the company's
 cooking and taste requirements.
     After more than a year of research and testing, Eat'n Park selected trans
 fat-free canola oil from Cargill, Inc., which originates from canola seeds
 produced by Bayer Corp.  In addition to being trans fat-free, canola oil also
 has only one gram of saturated fat per serving - an added health benefit.
     According to Brooks Broadhurst, vice president of purchasing for Eat'n
 Park Hospitality Group, the switch to trans fat-free oil will provide guests
 with healthier food, as well as a fresh, cleaner taste.
     "We spent more than a year of research, development and testing to ensure
 we chose the highest quality product.  We found a canola oil that was able to
 meet our high standards for flavor while providing zero trans-fats and lower
 saturated fat," said Broadhurst.  "Our food will have a clean, fresh taste
 while delivering the health benefits of trans fat-free and lower saturated fat
 cooking."
     The move will be completed by late-September in all 79 restaurant
 locations across Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia, as well as among the
 Eat'n Park Hospitality Group's Parkhurst Dining Services and CURA Hospitality
 business units.
     According to Broadhurst, the 32 corporate, university and museum cafe
 venues served by Parkhurst Dining Services - three of which are located in the
 Cleveland area, including John Carroll University, American Greetings and
 National City Bank - are seeing this trend emerge because parents and young
 adults alike are interested in improving their health. And, corporate venues
 are seeking ways to provide healthier food for employees.
     CURA Hospitality, which serves senior living communities, also is making
 the switch because more dieticians and health officials feel it's necessary to
 reduce trans fat among all audiences, particularly older Americans.
     "Switching to trans-fat free is the right thing to do," said Broadhurst.
 "Eat'n Park is committed to a consistent dining experience for its guests and
 the move to trans fat-free oil helps fulfill that promise."
     Trans fat oil is the creation of partial hydration, an industrial process
 that changes the properties of oils used mainly for baking and frying. Over
 time, trans fats can raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol
 levels and, at the same time, reduce high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or "good"
 cholesterol levels.
     "Chains like Eat'n Park that switch to trans fat-free cooking oil are on
 the leading edge of providing healthy alternatives for guests," said Pete
 Bordi, Ph.D., associate professor, director, Center for Food Innovation, Penn
 State University.  "Plus, they are helping to address a growing concern in
 America about the dangers of heart disease and high cholesterol diets."
     According to Broadhurst, Eat'n Park's commitment to healthy eating
 includes a variety of Eat'n Smart menu selections with fewer calories, less
 cholesterol and a lower fat content. The chain also is popular among parents
 seeking healthy alternatives for children, including fresh fruit and the Kid's
 Soup and Salad Bar.
     Low carb dieters can select from a variety of Eat'n Park favorites
 offering low net carbs. The chain also participates in the National Restaurant
 Association's "Just Ask Us" program, which provides consumers information
 about healthy restaurant eating.
     Nutritional information for all menu selections can be found at
 www.eatnpark.com.
 
     The Eat'n Park Hospitality Group is a portfolio of foodservice concepts
 focused on personalized dining. Founded in 1949 as a carhop restaurant, today
 it has grown to include Eat'n Park Restaurants, Parkhurst Dining Services -
 the company's contract dining division, providing contract dining services to
 corporations, educational institutions, and cultural venues, and CURA
 Hospitality - providing contract dining and management service for senior
 living communities. For more information, guests are invited to visit
 www.eatnpark.com.
 
     Eat'n Park Restaurants is an award-winning family restaurant and bakery
 chain with 79 locations in three states with more than 8,000 team members
 company-wide. Eat'n Park's properties also include the Park Classic Diners,
 which are retro eateries reminiscent of the company's roots. The chain is a
 division of the Eat'n Park Hospitality Group based in Pittsburgh, Pa.
 
 SOURCE  Eat'n Park Restaurants