Election Night Exclusive: 'This Is Terrible,' Exclaims Supreme Court Justice O'Connor After First Florida Projection; Husband Explains that Gore Presidency Would Delay Her Retirement because She Didn't Want a Democrat Naming Her Successor

Recollections of Clinton: Ex-Press Secretary McCurry says Encouraging the

Internet Helped Drive Nonstop Lewinsky Scandal



Dec 17, 2000, 00:00 ET from Newsweek

    NEW YORK, Dec. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Pulling back the curtain of presumed
 impartiality on the U.S. Supreme Court, the latest issue of Newsweek reports
 that at an election-night party, when U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day
 O'Connor heard Florida called for Al Gore, she exclaimed, "This is terrible."
 Then, with obvious disgust, she went to get a plate of food, according to two
 witnesses. Her husband John explained that his wife was upset because she
 wanted to retire to Arizona and they'd have to wait four years because
 O'Connor -- the former Republican majority leader of the Arizona State Senate
 and a 1981 Ronald Reagan appointee -- did not want a Democrat to name her
 successor.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20001216/HSSA005 )
     The incident is reported by Assistant Managing Editor Evan Thomas and
 Investigative Correspondent Michael Isikoff in Newsweek's Dec. 25, 2000/Jan.
 1, 2001 double issue (on newsstands Monday, Decemeber 18). The year-in-review
 issue includes an election wrap-up with a look at the motives at play on the
 U.S. Supreme Court, profiles of Bush and his potential cabinet members and an
 interview with George and Barbara Bush. Also in the politics coverage:
 
     Newsweek Contributing Editor David Brooks, also a senior editor at The
 Weekly Standard, writes a memo to the conservatives in Congress that says that
 the only way for Bush to thrive is to remember the compassionate-conservative
 agenda he offered in July 1999. It featured limited but energetic government
 programs. "The issues he addressed then are ones Democrats love: homelessness,
 drug addiction, poverty. But the approaches -- tax credits, some federal
 grants to faith-based charities -- were genuinely conservative." He could
 follow up with other programs and then "take advantage of the inevitable
 campaign-finance fight to craft a conservative version ... In the meantime,
 conservatives need to practice an ancient virtue: patience."
 
     NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw, in a guest essay, writes that after
 networks erred twice on Election Night, and after the 35 days and nights since
 then, "I think the overwhelming lesson, especially in this hurly-burly world
 of 24/7 news, is the enduring truth of journalism: rely on aggressive
 reporters to get the facts and leave the speculation to clearly labeled
 pundits and experts."
 
     First-hand recollections from some of President Clinton's key advisers
 during his eight years in office. A sample:
 
     Mike McCurry, White House Press Secretary, 1995-98, was struck by how the
 Internet helped drive the nonstop news cycle during the Monica Lewinsky
 scandal. It made it impossible to focus on anything else, even the "telltale
 signs of an approaching crisis in Kosovo that would lead America to war ...
 The great irony of the Clinton presidency is rooted in both the promise and
 the excess of the Information Age: President Clinton successfully guided
 economic and regulatory policy in a direction that allowed the Internet and
 the New Economy to blossom. But the Internet also helped make whispered rumor
 and bitter argument a defining feature of political discourse."
 
     Leon Panetta, White House Chief of Staff, 1994-97, recalls that during the
 government shutdown, "The president always had a hope he could cut a deal with
 [House Speaker Newt] Gingrich. As much as they had different philosophies and
 different views, the president always felt Gingrich was smart enough to see it
 was in his interest to cut a deal ... Finally the president just looked at
 them and said, 'You know, I just can't do what you want. I can't go along with
 what you want for the country. I think it's wrong. It may cost me the
 election, but you know, I'm not going to do it.' ... The line was drawn, and I
 think it was a turning point for the president, and probably one of the key
 turning points that led to his re-election."
 
     Robert Rubin, Secretary of the Treasury, 1995-99, remembers a key meeting
 with President-elect Clinton in 1993 about the budget strategy. "From the
 beginning what we [the economic team] recommended was that there ought to be a
 dramatic change in policy, with the view that deficit reduction should create
 lower interest rates and spur higher confidence. Before the meeting George
 Stephanopolous told me this was going to be hard, [that Clinton] would have to
 make that decision over time. But after about a half hour at the meeting
 Clinton turned to us in the dining room of the governor's mansion in Little
 Rock. He said, 'Look, I understand what deficit reduction means [in terms of
 public criticism for program cuts], but that's the threshold issue if we're
 going to get the economy back on track. Let's do it'."
 
              (Articles attached. Read Newsweek's news releases on
               http://www.Newsweek.MSNBC.com. Click "Pressroom."
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    NEW YORK, Dec. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Pulling back the curtain of presumed
 impartiality on the U.S. Supreme Court, the latest issue of Newsweek reports
 that at an election-night party, when U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day
 O'Connor heard Florida called for Al Gore, she exclaimed, "This is terrible."
 Then, with obvious disgust, she went to get a plate of food, according to two
 witnesses. Her husband John explained that his wife was upset because she
 wanted to retire to Arizona and they'd have to wait four years because
 O'Connor -- the former Republican majority leader of the Arizona State Senate
 and a 1981 Ronald Reagan appointee -- did not want a Democrat to name her
 successor.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20001216/HSSA005 )
     The incident is reported by Assistant Managing Editor Evan Thomas and
 Investigative Correspondent Michael Isikoff in Newsweek's Dec. 25, 2000/Jan.
 1, 2001 double issue (on newsstands Monday, Decemeber 18). The year-in-review
 issue includes an election wrap-up with a look at the motives at play on the
 U.S. Supreme Court, profiles of Bush and his potential cabinet members and an
 interview with George and Barbara Bush. Also in the politics coverage:
 
     Newsweek Contributing Editor David Brooks, also a senior editor at The
 Weekly Standard, writes a memo to the conservatives in Congress that says that
 the only way for Bush to thrive is to remember the compassionate-conservative
 agenda he offered in July 1999. It featured limited but energetic government
 programs. "The issues he addressed then are ones Democrats love: homelessness,
 drug addiction, poverty. But the approaches -- tax credits, some federal
 grants to faith-based charities -- were genuinely conservative." He could
 follow up with other programs and then "take advantage of the inevitable
 campaign-finance fight to craft a conservative version ... In the meantime,
 conservatives need to practice an ancient virtue: patience."
 
     NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw, in a guest essay, writes that after
 networks erred twice on Election Night, and after the 35 days and nights since
 then, "I think the overwhelming lesson, especially in this hurly-burly world
 of 24/7 news, is the enduring truth of journalism: rely on aggressive
 reporters to get the facts and leave the speculation to clearly labeled
 pundits and experts."
 
     First-hand recollections from some of President Clinton's key advisers
 during his eight years in office. A sample:
 
     Mike McCurry, White House Press Secretary, 1995-98, was struck by how the
 Internet helped drive the nonstop news cycle during the Monica Lewinsky
 scandal. It made it impossible to focus on anything else, even the "telltale
 signs of an approaching crisis in Kosovo that would lead America to war ...
 The great irony of the Clinton presidency is rooted in both the promise and
 the excess of the Information Age: President Clinton successfully guided
 economic and regulatory policy in a direction that allowed the Internet and
 the New Economy to blossom. But the Internet also helped make whispered rumor
 and bitter argument a defining feature of political discourse."
 
     Leon Panetta, White House Chief of Staff, 1994-97, recalls that during the
 government shutdown, "The president always had a hope he could cut a deal with
 [House Speaker Newt] Gingrich. As much as they had different philosophies and
 different views, the president always felt Gingrich was smart enough to see it
 was in his interest to cut a deal ... Finally the president just looked at
 them and said, 'You know, I just can't do what you want. I can't go along with
 what you want for the country. I think it's wrong. It may cost me the
 election, but you know, I'm not going to do it.' ... The line was drawn, and I
 think it was a turning point for the president, and probably one of the key
 turning points that led to his re-election."
 
     Robert Rubin, Secretary of the Treasury, 1995-99, remembers a key meeting
 with President-elect Clinton in 1993 about the budget strategy. "From the
 beginning what we [the economic team] recommended was that there ought to be a
 dramatic change in policy, with the view that deficit reduction should create
 lower interest rates and spur higher confidence. Before the meeting George
 Stephanopolous told me this was going to be hard, [that Clinton] would have to
 make that decision over time. But after about a half hour at the meeting
 Clinton turned to us in the dining room of the governor's mansion in Little
 Rock. He said, 'Look, I understand what deficit reduction means [in terms of
 public criticism for program cuts], but that's the threshold issue if we're
 going to get the economy back on track. Let's do it'."
 
              (Articles attached. Read Newsweek's news releases on
               http://www.Newsweek.MSNBC.com. Click "Pressroom."
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek