Girls Gone Wild Producers Win Landmark Federal Lawsuit

Federal Judge Officially Dismisses Florida Case Setting New Precedent



Dec 02, 2002, 00:00 ET from Mantra Films

    ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- The producers of the Girls Gone Wild
 videotapes, Mantra Films, announced today that they have won a milestone
 federal court case in Florida.  The federal court ruled Tuesday that Mantra
 Films did not violate the privacy rights of then 17-year-old Veronica Lane by
 using images of her exposing her breasts in the company's famous video series
 on a public street in Panama City Beach, Florida.
     In the precedent setting 29-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Anne Conway
 rejected assertions by Lane that Mantra should pay her for using her likeness
 for commercial purposes.  According to Judge Conway, "the Girls Gone Wild
 video is an expressive work created solely for entertainment purposes.  [In
 these videos] Lane is never shown endorsing or promoting a product."
     The court decision also found that Lane consented to the use of her image
 by exposing herself in exchange for beads and that her young age did not
 invalidate the consent.  "Florida law has never recognized that a minor is
 incapable of consenting to publication of her image and likeness where no
 compensation is involved," according to the court.
     Lane claimed she had been placed in a "false light" because her video had
 been marketed with Sexy Sorority Sweethearts, a title described by the judge
 as containing "even more extensive and offensive sexually explicit scenes."
 After reviewing both videos, the judge concluded there is "no suggestion,
 implication, or innuendo" connecting Lane with the other scenes.
     Thomas R. Julin, attorney for Girls Gone Wild, said, "I expect the
 decision to bring to a halt other claims made against Girls Gone Wild.  The
 Privacy Law does not protect people who choose to appear in public, clothed or
 otherwise."
 
     Mantra Entertainment is the leading producer and distributor of
 reality-based programming worldwide.  Mantra was formed in 1997 when Joe
 Francis recognized the opportunity to develop reality-based,
 direct-to-consumer video titles that did not fit the traditional mold of
 studio-distributed product.  Over the past five years, the company has
 established its reputation by creating such key franchises as Banned From
 Television and the pop-culture phenomenon Girls Gone Wild.
 
                      Make Your Opinion Count - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X75812573
 
 

SOURCE Mantra Films
    ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- The producers of the Girls Gone Wild
 videotapes, Mantra Films, announced today that they have won a milestone
 federal court case in Florida.  The federal court ruled Tuesday that Mantra
 Films did not violate the privacy rights of then 17-year-old Veronica Lane by
 using images of her exposing her breasts in the company's famous video series
 on a public street in Panama City Beach, Florida.
     In the precedent setting 29-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Anne Conway
 rejected assertions by Lane that Mantra should pay her for using her likeness
 for commercial purposes.  According to Judge Conway, "the Girls Gone Wild
 video is an expressive work created solely for entertainment purposes.  [In
 these videos] Lane is never shown endorsing or promoting a product."
     The court decision also found that Lane consented to the use of her image
 by exposing herself in exchange for beads and that her young age did not
 invalidate the consent.  "Florida law has never recognized that a minor is
 incapable of consenting to publication of her image and likeness where no
 compensation is involved," according to the court.
     Lane claimed she had been placed in a "false light" because her video had
 been marketed with Sexy Sorority Sweethearts, a title described by the judge
 as containing "even more extensive and offensive sexually explicit scenes."
 After reviewing both videos, the judge concluded there is "no suggestion,
 implication, or innuendo" connecting Lane with the other scenes.
     Thomas R. Julin, attorney for Girls Gone Wild, said, "I expect the
 decision to bring to a halt other claims made against Girls Gone Wild.  The
 Privacy Law does not protect people who choose to appear in public, clothed or
 otherwise."
 
     Mantra Entertainment is the leading producer and distributor of
 reality-based programming worldwide.  Mantra was formed in 1997 when Joe
 Francis recognized the opportunity to develop reality-based,
 direct-to-consumer video titles that did not fit the traditional mold of
 studio-distributed product.  Over the past five years, the company has
 established its reputation by creating such key franchises as Banned From
 Television and the pop-culture phenomenon Girls Gone Wild.
 
                      Make Your Opinion Count - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X75812573
 
 SOURCE  Mantra Films