Global Heritage Fund Leads Efforts to Preserve Iraq's Heritage

Jul 19, 2004, 01:00 ET from Global Heritage Fund

    PETRA, Jordan, July 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Global Heritage Fund (GHF) and the
 Iraqi State Board of Antiquities signed a multi-year partnership to jointly
 develop master conservation plans and training to help conserve Iraq's most
 endangered and important archaeological and world heritage sites.
     "This is a major step toward bringing world-class conservation to Iraq and
 preventing further loss and destruction," says Jeff Morgan, executive director
 of Global Heritage Fund, the leading international conservancy preserving
 endangered world heritage sites in developing countries.
     The partnership was the result of the recent GHF Iraq Heritage Congress,
 an eight-day workshop for 28 leading Iraqi site directors and conservators,
 co-sponsored by The World Bank.
     The event culminated with GHF, the Iraqi Department of Antiquities and the
 Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago agreeing to a multi-year
 structured program of master conservation planning, site mapping, emergency
 site conservation, training and capacity-building to assist in the world-class
 planning and conservation of Iraq's major archaeological and world heritage
 sites. Sixteen potential sites were identified.
     "GHF will ensure the highest standards of conservation, planning, site
 management, science, training and site intervention while providing critical
 expertise, technology and funding," says Morgan. "We anticipate Iraq to be
 able to implement a solid strategy of conservation and development to make
 cultural tourism the second largest industry in Iraq within 10 years and a
 major driver toward long-term protection of Iraq's world heritage."
     A key component of the site mapping aspect will be the technical expertise
 of the CAMEL Laboratory of the Oriental Institute at the University of
 Chicago, led by Drs. McGuire Gibson and Mark Altaweel.
     Over the next two years GHF will work closely with the Iraqi State Bureau
 of Antiquities and the Ministry of Culture to complete world-class site
 management plans for five high-priority sites and provide co-funding for two
 archaeological site conservations based on the priorities in the planning
 process. The plans will also help form the basis of formal designation by
 UNESCO World Heritage for enhanced protection and international support.
     "With the recent transition of government in Iraq, the Iraq Heritage
 Congress proved to be very timely and reinforced the critical need for a
 lasting framework for future development," says Morgan.
 
     For more information about GHF, visit http://www.globalheritagefund.org.
 
 

SOURCE Global Heritage Fund
    PETRA, Jordan, July 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Global Heritage Fund (GHF) and the
 Iraqi State Board of Antiquities signed a multi-year partnership to jointly
 develop master conservation plans and training to help conserve Iraq's most
 endangered and important archaeological and world heritage sites.
     "This is a major step toward bringing world-class conservation to Iraq and
 preventing further loss and destruction," says Jeff Morgan, executive director
 of Global Heritage Fund, the leading international conservancy preserving
 endangered world heritage sites in developing countries.
     The partnership was the result of the recent GHF Iraq Heritage Congress,
 an eight-day workshop for 28 leading Iraqi site directors and conservators,
 co-sponsored by The World Bank.
     The event culminated with GHF, the Iraqi Department of Antiquities and the
 Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago agreeing to a multi-year
 structured program of master conservation planning, site mapping, emergency
 site conservation, training and capacity-building to assist in the world-class
 planning and conservation of Iraq's major archaeological and world heritage
 sites. Sixteen potential sites were identified.
     "GHF will ensure the highest standards of conservation, planning, site
 management, science, training and site intervention while providing critical
 expertise, technology and funding," says Morgan. "We anticipate Iraq to be
 able to implement a solid strategy of conservation and development to make
 cultural tourism the second largest industry in Iraq within 10 years and a
 major driver toward long-term protection of Iraq's world heritage."
     A key component of the site mapping aspect will be the technical expertise
 of the CAMEL Laboratory of the Oriental Institute at the University of
 Chicago, led by Drs. McGuire Gibson and Mark Altaweel.
     Over the next two years GHF will work closely with the Iraqi State Bureau
 of Antiquities and the Ministry of Culture to complete world-class site
 management plans for five high-priority sites and provide co-funding for two
 archaeological site conservations based on the priorities in the planning
 process. The plans will also help form the basis of formal designation by
 UNESCO World Heritage for enhanced protection and international support.
     "With the recent transition of government in Iraq, the Iraq Heritage
 Congress proved to be very timely and reinforced the critical need for a
 lasting framework for future development," says Morgan.
 
     For more information about GHF, visit http://www.globalheritagefund.org.
 
 SOURCE  Global Heritage Fund