Land Ports of Entry at El Paso, Texas, Began US-VISIT Entry Procedures

US-VISIT Three Quarters of the Way to Goal



Dec 21, 2004, 00:00 ET from U.S. Department of Homeland Security

    WASHINGTON, Dec. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- US-VISIT biometric entry procedures
 began yesterday in the secondary inspection areas at land ports of entry at
 the Bridge of the Americas/Cordova Bridge, Paso del Norte Bridge and the
 Ysleta-Zaragoza Bridge in El Paso, Texas.
     US-VISIT is three quarters of the way to meeting its schedule to complete
 the deployment of entry procedures at the 50 busiest land ports of entry by
 December 31, 2004.
     Visitors requiring an arrival/departure Form I-94 to enter the United
 States, including those traveling under the Visa Waiver Program, will be
 processed through US-VISIT at the secondary inspection area. US-VISIT
 processing involves the collection of two index fingerscans and a digital
 photograph.  With the deployment of US-VISIT technology, a visitor will no
 longer be required to fill out the Form I-94 by hand.  Now the visitor's
 biographic information will be entered electronically when the U.S. Custom and
 Border Protection officer scans the visitor's travel document.  In ports where
 this technology has been deployed, the advancement has proven to expedite a
 visitor's inspection time.
     "We have now deployed US-VISIT at more than three quarters of the 50 land
 border ports of entry scheduled for implementation by the end of the year,"
 said Jim Williams, the Director of the US-VISIT Program, during a visit to the
 Bridge of the Americas/Cordova Bridge port earlier today.  "The simple, fast
 and clean US-VISIT technology and process allow for the more efficient
 management of data at the borders and are expediting the processing time for
 visitors subject to the procedures."
     The El Paso, Texas, ports that began processing visitors yesterday are
 part of a multi-phased deployment of US-VISIT over a period of several weeks.
 In addition to these ports, there are four other land ports of entry
 implementing the US-VISIT procedures this week: Calais-Ferry Point, Maine, and
 Champlain, Thousand Islands, and Massena, New York.  The US-VISIT procedures
 became operational in the ports of Lewiston-Queenston, Whirlpool Rapids, Peace
 Bridge and Rainbow Bridge, New York; Santa Teresa, New Mexico; Fabens and
 Presidio, Texas; and Derby Line, Vermont, on December 16, 2004; at Ambassador
 Bridge and Windsor Tunnel, Michigan, on December 13, 2004; in the ports of
 Otay Mesa, San Ysidro, and Tecate, California, and Lynden, Pacific Highway,
 Peace Arch, Point Roberts, and Sumas, Washington, on December 9, 2004; in the
 ports of Lukeville, Nogales and San Luis, Arizona, and Calexico and Andrade,
 California, on December 6, 2004; and in the ports of Douglas, Arizona, Port
 Huron-Blue Water, Michigan, and Convent Street, Columbia Solidarity Bridge,
 Lincoln-Juarez Bridge and World Trade Bridge, Texas, on November 15, 2004.
     The goals of US-VISIT are to enhance the security of our citizens and
 visitors; facilitate legitimate travel and trade; ensure the integrity of our
 immigration system; and protect the privacy of our visitors. US-VISIT is a
 continuum of security measures that begins overseas, when a person applies for
 a visa to travel to the United States, and continues on through entry and exit
 at U.S. airports and seaports and, eventually, at land border crossings.
 These measures will be expanded by the end of this year to the secondary
 inspection areas of the 50 busiest land ports of entry and to the remaining
 115 land ports of entry by December 31, 2005.
     US-VISIT procedures will not impact visitors processed in the primary
 inspection area, but will apply to foreign visitors who are already processed
 in the secondary inspection areas.  At land ports of entry, the secondary
 inspection area is where visitors traveling with visas or passports are
 processed.  In addition to exempt Canadian citizens, initially most Mexican
 visitors who apply for admission using a Border Crossing Card (BCC) and travel
 within the "Border Zone" will not be processed through US-VISIT.
     Since January 5, 2004, US-VISIT entry procedures have become operational
 at 115 airports, 15 seaports and at over two dozen land ports of entry.  More
 than 14.5 million foreign visitors have been processed without adversely
 impacting wait times.  At the same time, because of US-VISIT, the United
 States has been able to arrest or deny admission to more than 360 criminals or
 immigration violators.  These included federal penitentiary escapees,
 convicted rapists, drug traffickers, individuals convicted of manslaughter and
 credit card fraud, a convicted armed robber and numerous immigration violators
 and individuals attempting visa fraud.
     Experience has shown that the US-VISIT enrollment process is fast, easy to
 understand and simple for visitors.  Expanding US-VISIT entry procedures to
 our land ports of entry builds on the Department's progress to enhance
 security for our citizens and visitors while facilitating legitimate travel
 and trade through our borders.
     For more information, visit http://www.dhs.gov/us-visit .
 
 

SOURCE U.S. Department of Homeland Security
    WASHINGTON, Dec. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- US-VISIT biometric entry procedures
 began yesterday in the secondary inspection areas at land ports of entry at
 the Bridge of the Americas/Cordova Bridge, Paso del Norte Bridge and the
 Ysleta-Zaragoza Bridge in El Paso, Texas.
     US-VISIT is three quarters of the way to meeting its schedule to complete
 the deployment of entry procedures at the 50 busiest land ports of entry by
 December 31, 2004.
     Visitors requiring an arrival/departure Form I-94 to enter the United
 States, including those traveling under the Visa Waiver Program, will be
 processed through US-VISIT at the secondary inspection area. US-VISIT
 processing involves the collection of two index fingerscans and a digital
 photograph.  With the deployment of US-VISIT technology, a visitor will no
 longer be required to fill out the Form I-94 by hand.  Now the visitor's
 biographic information will be entered electronically when the U.S. Custom and
 Border Protection officer scans the visitor's travel document.  In ports where
 this technology has been deployed, the advancement has proven to expedite a
 visitor's inspection time.
     "We have now deployed US-VISIT at more than three quarters of the 50 land
 border ports of entry scheduled for implementation by the end of the year,"
 said Jim Williams, the Director of the US-VISIT Program, during a visit to the
 Bridge of the Americas/Cordova Bridge port earlier today.  "The simple, fast
 and clean US-VISIT technology and process allow for the more efficient
 management of data at the borders and are expediting the processing time for
 visitors subject to the procedures."
     The El Paso, Texas, ports that began processing visitors yesterday are
 part of a multi-phased deployment of US-VISIT over a period of several weeks.
 In addition to these ports, there are four other land ports of entry
 implementing the US-VISIT procedures this week: Calais-Ferry Point, Maine, and
 Champlain, Thousand Islands, and Massena, New York.  The US-VISIT procedures
 became operational in the ports of Lewiston-Queenston, Whirlpool Rapids, Peace
 Bridge and Rainbow Bridge, New York; Santa Teresa, New Mexico; Fabens and
 Presidio, Texas; and Derby Line, Vermont, on December 16, 2004; at Ambassador
 Bridge and Windsor Tunnel, Michigan, on December 13, 2004; in the ports of
 Otay Mesa, San Ysidro, and Tecate, California, and Lynden, Pacific Highway,
 Peace Arch, Point Roberts, and Sumas, Washington, on December 9, 2004; in the
 ports of Lukeville, Nogales and San Luis, Arizona, and Calexico and Andrade,
 California, on December 6, 2004; and in the ports of Douglas, Arizona, Port
 Huron-Blue Water, Michigan, and Convent Street, Columbia Solidarity Bridge,
 Lincoln-Juarez Bridge and World Trade Bridge, Texas, on November 15, 2004.
     The goals of US-VISIT are to enhance the security of our citizens and
 visitors; facilitate legitimate travel and trade; ensure the integrity of our
 immigration system; and protect the privacy of our visitors. US-VISIT is a
 continuum of security measures that begins overseas, when a person applies for
 a visa to travel to the United States, and continues on through entry and exit
 at U.S. airports and seaports and, eventually, at land border crossings.
 These measures will be expanded by the end of this year to the secondary
 inspection areas of the 50 busiest land ports of entry and to the remaining
 115 land ports of entry by December 31, 2005.
     US-VISIT procedures will not impact visitors processed in the primary
 inspection area, but will apply to foreign visitors who are already processed
 in the secondary inspection areas.  At land ports of entry, the secondary
 inspection area is where visitors traveling with visas or passports are
 processed.  In addition to exempt Canadian citizens, initially most Mexican
 visitors who apply for admission using a Border Crossing Card (BCC) and travel
 within the "Border Zone" will not be processed through US-VISIT.
     Since January 5, 2004, US-VISIT entry procedures have become operational
 at 115 airports, 15 seaports and at over two dozen land ports of entry.  More
 than 14.5 million foreign visitors have been processed without adversely
 impacting wait times.  At the same time, because of US-VISIT, the United
 States has been able to arrest or deny admission to more than 360 criminals or
 immigration violators.  These included federal penitentiary escapees,
 convicted rapists, drug traffickers, individuals convicted of manslaughter and
 credit card fraud, a convicted armed robber and numerous immigration violators
 and individuals attempting visa fraud.
     Experience has shown that the US-VISIT enrollment process is fast, easy to
 understand and simple for visitors.  Expanding US-VISIT entry procedures to
 our land ports of entry builds on the Department's progress to enhance
 security for our citizens and visitors while facilitating legitimate travel
 and trade through our borders.
     For more information, visit http://www.dhs.gov/us-visit .
 
 SOURCE  U.S. Department of Homeland Security