LeoShe(TM) Web Study Predicts Women Are the Future of E-Commerce

To tap the potential, LeoShe(TM) tells marketers to 'Think Like a Woman,

Not Like a Company'



Nov 17, 1999, 00:00 ET from Leo Burnett Company

    CHICAGO, Nov. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Want to make a fortune through
 e-commerce?  Think like a woman.  While women are quickly becoming the
 majority of on-line users and purchasers, a new study from LeoShe(TM) predicts
 a dramatic acceleration in the number of women who not only visit the
 Internet, but who also shop there and use it to manage their lives.
     "Two-thirds of women on-line have already made the Internet an essential
 part of their lives, and this number will only grow.  The Internet will
 increasingly provide an effective way to reach and tap into the significant
 purchasing power of this group," said Denise Fedewa, co-founder of LeoShe and
 vp/planning director at Leo Burnett U.S.A.
     LeoShe, the women's marketing and insights group of Leo Burnett, talked to
 nearly 3,000 people on-line for its "Women on the Web" study to help Burnett
 clients get a deeper understanding of how the Web fits into women's lives.
     "Every company and every brand needs to take a long look at the voice and
 the path they are using to speak to what is quickly becoming the heaviest
 group of Internet users -- women," said Fedewa.
 
     Clicking Through to Female Consumers
     "Instead of looking through the lens of a particular category, it's
 critical that we speak to a woman on-line as a whole person because that is
 how she processes and seeks information," said Cherri Patel, co-founder of
 LeoShe and vp/planning director.  "This study emphasizes that one cannot get
 inside the pocketbooks of women on-line without first getting inside their
 heads."
     To reach the growing number of women who are savvy, on-line pros,
 marketers should consider forming or being a part of a "metamarket," an
 on-line community of commerce strictly defined by consumers' activities and
 needs, often constructed around major life events and assets.  One clear
 example of a metamarket target is a mother-to-be.
     "When a woman is pregnant, she's not necessarily thinking about the latest
 stroller technology, so she won't visit a Web site in that category," Patel
 said.  "Instead she'll visit a metamarket site like baby.com that provides
 broad maternity and baby information.  This may lead a woman to find and
 purchase a stroller or other items on-line."
 
     Five Faces On-Line
     The LeoShe team also tells marketers to identify the female target and
 learn all about her habits and interests in the on-line arena.
     The LeoShe study revealed several characteristics of women on the Web and
 identified five general categories of female consumers based on use, interest,
 ability, off-line personality and opportunity for commerce on the Web:
 
     -- Baby Steps (13%) -- Largely through her kids, this woman's starting to
        make inroads in her relationship with the Web.  She concentrates on
        beginner tasks like checking horoscopes, reading the news and e-mailing
        friends.  She'd rather shop at the mall than on-line and is very
        concerned about credit card security.
 
     -- Frankly Frustrated (20%) -- She only allows the Web to play a limited,
        professional role in her life.  She has less confidence on the Internet
        than in her other environments so she needs the site provider to help
        her have a better experience with this new technology.
 
     -- My Personal Assistant (29%) -- She is part of the largest segment and
        is highly skilled in using the Web as her personal tool.  She views her
        relationship with the Internet as a practical partnership and she's
        getting things done on-line, not socializing.  She's the bullseye
        e-commerce target.
 
     -- Yin and Yang (13%) -- She's an avid user of the Internet, and despite a
        few concerns about addiction and trust, she appreciates the full realm
        of the Internet and is not afraid to fill her shopping cart and offer
        her credit card number as payment.  As a member of Gen X, she's just
        plain different because computers have always been a part of her life.
 
     -- My Everything (23%) -- This daily, skilled user aggressively explores
        the Internet, surfing, shopping and learning from all global realms.
        At home and/or work, the Internet is completely woven into her life and
        is the window to her world.  Surprisingly, she is in a lower income
        household, shattering the myth of only the well-off embracing the Web.
 
     "By following our segmentation of the female Internet user, brands can
 become even more relevant in this one-to-one communication vehicle that will
 become a significant source of entertainment and learning for women in the
 coming years.  If companies fail to connect with women, they'll be missing
 out on unprecedented purchasing power that can make or break their e-commerce
 site," said Fedewa.  "These insights also have implications for site design.
 A Baby Steps user needs step-by-step guidance to have a good first experience
 while My Personal Assistant just wants to get things done.  To be successful,
 site designers need to provide options for the full range of women on the
 Web."
 
     About the Study and the Team
     The LeoShe "Women on the Web" study included on-line interviews with more
 than 2,900 demographically diverse women with a comparison sampling of men.
     LeoShe(TM) is a cross-functional team of women who joined forces in 1998
 to "explore and lead new thinking on women's issues."  Its lead team includes
 Fedewa; Patel; Susan Wayne, vp, account director; and Jeanie Caggiano, vp,
 creative director.
     Leo Burnett ( www.leoburnett.com ) is part of a global holding company
 called The Leo Group that encompasses a network of more than 280 operating
 units across 81 markets, including 91 full-service advertising agencies and a
 variety of specialty marketing services including direct, database and
 interactive marketing, sales promotion and public relations.  Leo Burnett
 currently handles seven of the world's 25 most valuable global brands as
 ranked by Interbrand:  McDonald's, Coca-Cola, Walt Disney, Marlboro, Kellogg,
 Tampax and Nintendo.  It handles 22 other brands in the top 100.
     Founded in Chicago in 1935 with eight employees and three clients, today
 Leo Burnett employs nearly 9,100 people and posted billings last year of
 $6.81 billion.
 
 

SOURCE Leo Burnett Company
    CHICAGO, Nov. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Want to make a fortune through
 e-commerce?  Think like a woman.  While women are quickly becoming the
 majority of on-line users and purchasers, a new study from LeoShe(TM) predicts
 a dramatic acceleration in the number of women who not only visit the
 Internet, but who also shop there and use it to manage their lives.
     "Two-thirds of women on-line have already made the Internet an essential
 part of their lives, and this number will only grow.  The Internet will
 increasingly provide an effective way to reach and tap into the significant
 purchasing power of this group," said Denise Fedewa, co-founder of LeoShe and
 vp/planning director at Leo Burnett U.S.A.
     LeoShe, the women's marketing and insights group of Leo Burnett, talked to
 nearly 3,000 people on-line for its "Women on the Web" study to help Burnett
 clients get a deeper understanding of how the Web fits into women's lives.
     "Every company and every brand needs to take a long look at the voice and
 the path they are using to speak to what is quickly becoming the heaviest
 group of Internet users -- women," said Fedewa.
 
     Clicking Through to Female Consumers
     "Instead of looking through the lens of a particular category, it's
 critical that we speak to a woman on-line as a whole person because that is
 how she processes and seeks information," said Cherri Patel, co-founder of
 LeoShe and vp/planning director.  "This study emphasizes that one cannot get
 inside the pocketbooks of women on-line without first getting inside their
 heads."
     To reach the growing number of women who are savvy, on-line pros,
 marketers should consider forming or being a part of a "metamarket," an
 on-line community of commerce strictly defined by consumers' activities and
 needs, often constructed around major life events and assets.  One clear
 example of a metamarket target is a mother-to-be.
     "When a woman is pregnant, she's not necessarily thinking about the latest
 stroller technology, so she won't visit a Web site in that category," Patel
 said.  "Instead she'll visit a metamarket site like baby.com that provides
 broad maternity and baby information.  This may lead a woman to find and
 purchase a stroller or other items on-line."
 
     Five Faces On-Line
     The LeoShe team also tells marketers to identify the female target and
 learn all about her habits and interests in the on-line arena.
     The LeoShe study revealed several characteristics of women on the Web and
 identified five general categories of female consumers based on use, interest,
 ability, off-line personality and opportunity for commerce on the Web:
 
     -- Baby Steps (13%) -- Largely through her kids, this woman's starting to
        make inroads in her relationship with the Web.  She concentrates on
        beginner tasks like checking horoscopes, reading the news and e-mailing
        friends.  She'd rather shop at the mall than on-line and is very
        concerned about credit card security.
 
     -- Frankly Frustrated (20%) -- She only allows the Web to play a limited,
        professional role in her life.  She has less confidence on the Internet
        than in her other environments so she needs the site provider to help
        her have a better experience with this new technology.
 
     -- My Personal Assistant (29%) -- She is part of the largest segment and
        is highly skilled in using the Web as her personal tool.  She views her
        relationship with the Internet as a practical partnership and she's
        getting things done on-line, not socializing.  She's the bullseye
        e-commerce target.
 
     -- Yin and Yang (13%) -- She's an avid user of the Internet, and despite a
        few concerns about addiction and trust, she appreciates the full realm
        of the Internet and is not afraid to fill her shopping cart and offer
        her credit card number as payment.  As a member of Gen X, she's just
        plain different because computers have always been a part of her life.
 
     -- My Everything (23%) -- This daily, skilled user aggressively explores
        the Internet, surfing, shopping and learning from all global realms.
        At home and/or work, the Internet is completely woven into her life and
        is the window to her world.  Surprisingly, she is in a lower income
        household, shattering the myth of only the well-off embracing the Web.
 
     "By following our segmentation of the female Internet user, brands can
 become even more relevant in this one-to-one communication vehicle that will
 become a significant source of entertainment and learning for women in the
 coming years.  If companies fail to connect with women, they'll be missing
 out on unprecedented purchasing power that can make or break their e-commerce
 site," said Fedewa.  "These insights also have implications for site design.
 A Baby Steps user needs step-by-step guidance to have a good first experience
 while My Personal Assistant just wants to get things done.  To be successful,
 site designers need to provide options for the full range of women on the
 Web."
 
     About the Study and the Team
     The LeoShe "Women on the Web" study included on-line interviews with more
 than 2,900 demographically diverse women with a comparison sampling of men.
     LeoShe(TM) is a cross-functional team of women who joined forces in 1998
 to "explore and lead new thinking on women's issues."  Its lead team includes
 Fedewa; Patel; Susan Wayne, vp, account director; and Jeanie Caggiano, vp,
 creative director.
     Leo Burnett ( www.leoburnett.com ) is part of a global holding company
 called The Leo Group that encompasses a network of more than 280 operating
 units across 81 markets, including 91 full-service advertising agencies and a
 variety of specialty marketing services including direct, database and
 interactive marketing, sales promotion and public relations.  Leo Burnett
 currently handles seven of the world's 25 most valuable global brands as
 ranked by Interbrand:  McDonald's, Coca-Cola, Walt Disney, Marlboro, Kellogg,
 Tampax and Nintendo.  It handles 22 other brands in the top 100.
     Founded in Chicago in 1935 with eight employees and three clients, today
 Leo Burnett employs nearly 9,100 people and posted billings last year of
 $6.81 billion.
 
 SOURCE  Leo Burnett Company