New Food, Beverage Initiative to Focus Kids' Ads on Healthy Choices; Revised Guidelines Strengthen CARU's Guidance to Food Advertisers Industry Pledge Program, Key Guidelines Revisions Follow Extensive Review



    ARLINGTON, Va., Nov. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- The Council of Better Business
 Bureaus (CBBB) and the National Advertising Review Council (NARC) today
 announced two significant developments in the self-regulation of
 advertising directed to children under 12:
     First is the establishment of the Children's Food and Beverage
 Advertising Initiative (Initiative), a voluntary self-regulation program
 with 10 of the largest food and beverage companies as charter participants.
 The Initiative is designed to shift the mix of advertising messaging to
 children to encourage healthier dietary choices and healthy lifestyles.
 Charter participants are Cadbury Schweppes USA; Campbell Soup Company; The
 Coca-Cola Company; General Mills, Inc.; The Hershey Company; Kellogg
 Company; Kraft Foods Inc.; McDonald's; PepsiCo, Inc. and Unilever. It is
 estimated that these companies account for more than two-thirds of
 children's food and beverage television advertising expenditures.
     Second is the approval of significant revisions to the Self-Regulatory
 Guidelines for Children's Advertising. The revised Guidelines strengthen
 the ability of the CBBB's Children's Advertising Review Unit (CARU), which
 monitors all advertising directed to children under 12, to provide guidance
 and oversight to all industry sectors.
     Both the Initiative and the revisions to the Guidelines evolved from
 the in-depth review of the Guidelines undertaken by NARC and led by Joan Z.
 (Jodie) Bernstein, a former director of the Federal Trade Commission's
 Bureau of Consumer Protection.
     "These are important developments. The Initiative represents an
 innovative effort to promote healthier dietary choices and lifestyles to
 children. I commend these 10 companies for coming together in a meaningful
 new program that will have strong oversight," Ms. Bernstein said. "In
 addition, the revised Guidelines will assist CARU to continue to hold all
 advertising to children under 12 to high standards. Together, these efforts
 are a great step forward."
     Under the terms of the Initiative, participating companies commit to:
 
     * Devote at least half their advertising directed to children on
       television, radio, print and Internet to promote healthier dietary
       choices and/or to messages that encourage good nutrition or healthy
       lifestyles.
 
     * Limit products shown in interactive games to healthier dietary choices,
       or incorporate healthy lifestyle messages into the games.
 
     * Not advertise food or beverage products in elementary schools.
 
     * Not engage in food and beverage product placement in editorial and
       entertainment content.
 
     * Reduce the use of third-party licensed characters in advertising that
       does not meet the Initiative's product or messaging criteria.
     Each participating company will submit to the CBBB a commitment,
 tailored to the company's product portfolio, that complies with the
 principles of the Initiative. Company commitments that identify
 better-for-you dietary choices must be consistent with established
 scientific and/or government standards. The CBBB expects the program to be
 up and running within the next six to nine months.
     "Self-regulation works best when backed by strong and effective
 accountability," said Steven J. Cole, CBBB President and CEO. "We will
 closely monitor adherence to the participant commitments. This program is
 an excellent example of how voluntary self-regulation and the BBB advance
 marketplace trust."
     C. Lee Peeler, Executive Vice President, Advertising Self-Regulation,
 CBBB, and President and CEO, NARC, will lead the Initiative. The Initiative
 will be further supported by experts in nutrition and media research.
 Program staff will monitor companies' compliance with their commitments and
 will maintain a publicly accessible Website that details their findings.
     "We hope the experience we gain implementing the Initiative will
 provide a basis for enhancing the program and expanding it to other
 companies across the food and beverage industry," said NARC Board Chairman
 Nancy Wiese, an Association of National Advertisers Board member and the
 Vice President, Worldwide Brand Marketing/Advertising at Xerox. "We also
 plan to coordinate this effort with the Ad Council's Coalition for Healthy
 Children, which is simultaneously developing a consistent set of good
 nutrition and healthy lifestyle messages."
     The Guidelines Review process brought together more than 40 leading
 children's advertisers across industry sectors -- broad participation that
 demonstrates the children's advertising industry's strong support for self-
 regulation. The revised CARU Guidelines have been expanded to:
     * Provide new authorization for CARU to take action on advertising
       targeted to children that is "unfair," in addition to advertising that
       is misleading.
 
     * Specifically address "blurring," or advertising that obscures the line
       between editorial content and advertising messages. A new provision,
       which applies across all media, prohibits advertising that "blurs the
       distinction between advertising and program/editorial content in ways
       that would be misleading to children."
 
     * Specifically address the use of commercial messages in interactive
       games, sometimes referred to as advergaming. The revised Guidelines
       require that "if an advertiser integrates a commercial message into the
       content of a game or activity, then the advertiser should make clear, in
       a manner that will be easily understood by the targeted audience, that
       it is an advertisement."
     The revised Guidelines also strengthen CARU's guidance to food
 advertisers in a number of areas, such as clarifying that children's food
 advertising should not depict over-consumption or discourage or disparage
 healthy lifestyle or healthy dietary choices.
     Additionally, Ms. Wiese said, "the Guidelines review process has
 identified areas that require continued review. The NARC Board has
 requested further discussion of the issues of product placement in
 children's programming and the advertising of telephone services to
 children."
     To access a copy of the revised CARU Self-Regulatory Guidelines for
 Children's Advertising, please visit http://www.CARU.org
     About the CBBB
     Founded in 1970, the CBBB is the national organization for the Better
 Business Bureau system. The BBB system is dedicated to fostering trust
 between businesses and consumers in both the traditional and online
 marketplace. The first BBB was founded in 1912 -- today, the BBB system is
 comprised of 129 local Better Business Bureaus (BBBs) across the US and
 Canada, and serves millions of consumers, nearly 400,000 small and medium
 business members, and hundreds of national and multi-national corporations
 based in North America. The BBB system has grown to become the most trusted
 name and recognized advocate for promoting ethical business and advertising
 practices, providing more than 90 million instances of service to consumers
 and businesses in 2005. For more information on the BBB system, visit
 http://www.bbb.org.
     About NARC
     The National Advertising Review Council (NARC) was formed in 1971 by
 the CBBB, the Association of National Advertisers, Inc. (ANA), the American
 Association of Advertising Agencies, Inc. (AAAA), and the American
 Advertising Federation, Inc. (AAF). Its purpose is to foster truth and
 accuracy in national advertising through voluntary self-regulation. NARC is
 the body that establishes the policies and procedures for the CBBB's
 National Advertising Division (NAD) and Children's Advertising Review Unit
 (CARU), as well as for the National Advertising Review Board (NARB). NAD
 and CARU are the investigative arms of the advertising industry's voluntary
 self-regulation program. Their casework results from competitive challenges
 from other advertisers, and also from self-monitoring traditional and new
 media. The National Advertising Review Board (NARB), the appeals body, is a
 peer group from which ad-hoc panels are selected to adjudicate those cases
 that are not resolved at the NAD/CARU level. This unique, self-regulatory
 system is funded entirely by the business community; CARU is financed by
 the children's advertising industry, while NAD/NARC/NARB's sole source of
 funding is derived from membership fees paid to the CBBB. For more
 information about advertising self regulation, please visit
 http://www.narcpartners.org.
              Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative
             Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children's Advertising
                                   Fact Sheet
 
     * Advertising Industry Self-Regulation -- The National Advertising Review
       Council (NARC) was formed in 1971 by the Association of National
       Advertisers, Inc. (ANA), the American Association of Advertising
       Agencies, Inc. (AAAA), the American Advertising Federation, Inc. (AAF),
       and the Council of Better Business Bureaus (CBBB.) Its purpose is to
       foster truth and accuracy in national advertising through voluntary
       self-regulation. The Children's Advertising Review Unit (CARU) monitors
       advertising to children under 12 across all industry sectors.
 
     * CARU's Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children Advertising -- CARU's
       Guidelines were first adopted in 1974 and provide both general and
       specific guidance to children's advertisers across business sectors.
 
     * The Guidelines Review Working Group -- The 2006 Guidelines Review
       process brought together leading children's advertisers across industry
       sectors in a working group led by Joan Z. (Jodie) Bernstein, a former
       director of the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer
       Protection. Representatives of more than 40 companies participated in
       the process.  The process produced a new self-regulatory program -- The
       Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative -- and key revisions
       to the CARU Guidelines.
 
     * The Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative -- A voluntary
       self-regulation program created by the Council of Better Business
       Bureaus with 10 of the largest food and beverage companies as charter
       participants.
 
     * Initiative Charter Companies -- Cadbury Schweppes USA; Campbell Soup
       Company; The Coca-Cola Company; General Mills, Inc.; The Hershey
       Company; Kellogg Company; Kraft Foods Inc.; McDonald's; PepsiCo, Inc.
       and Unilever.
 
     * Initiative Goals -- The Initiative is aimed at shifting the mix of
       advertising messaging directed to children under 12 to encourage
       healthier dietary choices and healthy lifestyles.
 
     * Initiative Overview -- Participants commit to devote at least half their
       advertising directed to children under 12 to promote healthier dietary
       choices and/or to messages that encourage good nutrition or healthy
       lifestyles. Healthier-product pledges must be consistent with
       established scientific and/or government standards, including USDA
       Dietary Guidelines and My Pyramid, and FDA standards for health claims.
 
     * Initiative Specifics -- Participating companies commit to:
 
       -- Limit products shown in interactive games to healthy dietary choices,
          or incorporate healthy lifestyle messages in the games.
       -- Not advertise food or beverage products in elementary schools.
       -- Not engage in product placement of food and beverage products in
          editorial and entertainment content.
       -- Reduce the use of third-party licensed characters in advertising that
          does not meet the Initiative's product or messaging criteria.
 
     * Initiative Implementation -- The Initiative will be administered by the
       CBBB with the assistance of experts in nutrition and media research. The
       CBBB expects to have the program up and running within six to nine
       months.
 
     * Initiative Staff -- C. Lee Peeler, Executive Vice President, Advertising
       Self-Regulation, CBBB, and President and CEO, NARC, will lead the
       Initiative.  Initiative staff will:
 
       -- Review each company's specific commitment.
       -- Monitor companies' commitments.
       -- Respond to questions from the public.
       -- Report on the program's activities.
       -- Maintain a Website that will provide the public with information
          about each company's Initiative.
 
     * Key Revisions to the CARU Guidelines -- The revised Guidelines:
 
       -- Provide authorization for CARU to take action on "unfair" advertising
          targeted to children, broadening CARU's oversight.
       -- Specifically address "blurring," or advertising that obscures the
          line between editorial content and advertising messages.
       -- Specifically address the use of commercial messages in online
          interactive games, sometimes referred to as advergaming.
       -- Strengthen CARU's guidance to food and beverage advertisers.
 
     * Going Forward -- The NARC Board has requested further discussion of the
       issues of product placement in children's programming and the
       advertising of telephone services to children and will continue its
       review of children's food advertising issues as it gains experience with
       the Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative.
 
 
              Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative
             Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children's Advertising
                                      Q&A
 
     What are the CBBB and NARC announcing today?
     We're announcing two significant new self-regulatory efforts -- the
 establishment of the Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative
 (Initiative) and revisions to the Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children's
 Advertising (Guidelines.)
     The Initiative is an ambitious new industry self-regulatory program
 aimed at shifting the mix of advertising messaging to children to encourage
 healthier dietary choices and healthy lifestyles.
     Currently, 10 of the nation's largest food and beverage companies have
 pledged their support. Charter participants are Cadbury Schweppes USA;
 Campbell Soup Company; The Coca-Cola Company; General Mills, Inc.; The
 Hershey Company; Kellogg Company; Kraft Foods Inc.; McDonald's; PepsiCo,
 Inc. and Unilever.
     Revisions to the Guidelines broaden and strengthen the Children's
 Advertising Review Unit (CARU), which monitors all advertising to children
 under 12.
     The CBBB and NARC had earlier announced a review of the Guidelines. Is
 the Initiative a product of the same review?
     Yes. The Initiative is a new self-regulatory effort for food and
 beverage companies and it evolved from the same review. The Guidelines are
 applied to all children's advertisers across all industry sectors.
     How did the Guidelines review process work?
     The review process was led by Joan Z. (Jodie) Bernstein, a former
 director of the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection.
 All CARU supporters were invited to participate in discussion and debate of
 the Guidelines. Representatives of more than 40 companies contributed to
 the process.
     Did groups representing children, public interest groups, or government
 agencies participate?
     At the outset, the working group leader met with a number of outside
 organizations. The working group also benefited from the testimony at
 several federal workshops and reviewed and considered several reports on
 children's advertising, including reports from the Institute of Medicine
 and the Kaiser Family Foundation.
     Will the Initiative make a difference in the kind of ads children see?
     Yes. Participants commit to devote at least half their advertising
 directed to children under 12 to promote healthier dietary choices and/or
 to messages that encourage good nutrition or healthy lifestyles. That
 percentage represents a floor, not a ceiling; some companies may do more.
 The percentage may increase over time.
     Is there more to a company's commitment?
     Yes. Each company's commitment also addresses interactive games,
 product placement and the use of third-party licensed characters.
 Participating companies have agreed to:
     * Limit products shown in interactive games to healthier dietary choices,
       or incorporate healthy lifestyle messages into the games.
     * Not engage in food and beverage product placement in editorial and
       entertainment content.
     * Reduce the use of third-party licensed characters in advertising that
       does not meet the Initiative's product or messaging criteria.
 
     What about advertising in schools?
     Participating companies have also agreed not to advertise food or
 beverage products in elementary schools.
     Is the Initiative limited to these 10 companies?
     No. Any food or beverage advertiser may join. NARC intends to continue
 its review to seek ways to expand the program.
     Is the Initiative supported by nutrition-based principles?
     Yes. The Initiative requires participating companies to shift the mix
 of advertising directed to children under 12 to encourage healthier dietary
 choices and lifestyles. Company commitments that identify healthier dietary
 choices must be consistent with established scientific and/or government
 standards. Such standards include:
     * FDA-defined "healthy" foods.
     * Products that meet the FDA or USDA criteria for claims of "free," "low,"
       or "reduced" calories, total fat, saturated fat, sodium or sugar.
     * Products that qualify for the USDA "Healthier Schools Challenge."
     * Principles addressing recommended consumption by children under 12 under
       USDA Dietary Guidelines and My Pyramid.
     * Products representing portion-control options, such as 100-calorie
       packs.
     Some of the participating companies have already announced big changes
 in food production and marketing. How is this different?
     This is the first time that companies representing more than two-thirds
 of television food and beverage advertising to children have made a public
 commitment to devote a significant share of their advertising to nutrition
 and fitness. In addition, this program has independent third-party
 administration and enforcement -- both essential to the effectiveness of
 the program. The CBBB will perform that function here as it has in other
 instances.
     When does the Initiative begin?
     The CBBB expects the program to be up and running within the next six
 to nine months.
     Who will decide whether a company is meeting its commitments?
     Initiative staff will monitor companies' compliance with their
 commitments and will maintain a publicly accessible Website that details
 their findings. Initiative staff also will take consumer complaints.
     What will happen if a company doesn't meet its commitment?
     A company that does not meet its commitment may be expelled from the
 program and, in appropriate circumstances, be referred to appropriate
 regulatory authorities, such as the Federal Trade Commission.
     Can you provide an example of appropriate messaging?
     Each company will craft its own commitment. One source for such
 messaging could be the Ad Council's Coalition for Healthy Children, which
 is developing a consistent set of good nutrition and healthy lifestyles
 messages.
     How do the Guidelines revisions affect the children's advertising
 industry?
     The Guidelines, originally adopted in 1974, establish high standards
 for the advertising industry to assure that advertising directed to
 children under the age of 12 is truthful and not inappropriate for its
 intended audience.
     The revisions broaden the responsibility of the Children's Advertising
 Review Unit (CARU) and strengthen CARU's guidance to advertisers. The
 revised Guidelines:
     * Provide authorization for CARU to take action on "unfair" advertising
       targeted to children, broadening CARU's oversight.
     * Specifically address "blurring," or advertising that obscures the line
       between editorial content and advertising messages.
     * Specifically address the use of commercial messages in online
       interactive games, sometimes referred to as advergaming.
     * Strengthen CARU's guidance to food and beverage advertisers.
     Do the revised Guidelines address emerging forms of advertising like
 buzz, viral and mobile marketing?
     Yes. The Guidelines apply to all advertising directed to children under
 12, regardless of the medium or venue, as long as it's national (or broadly
 regional) in scope. CARU has already investigated some instances of
 advertising to children of services that can be purchased over mobile
 telephones.
     Do you anticipate further revisions to the Guidelines?
     Yes. It's important that the Guidelines remain current with
 developments in the marketplace. The NARC Board of Directors has requested
 further discussion of the issues of product placement in children's
 programming and the advertising of telephone services to children.
              Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative
 
     Introduction
     Companies engaged in advertising and marketing food and beverage
 products have developed this self regulatory initiative for advertising
 such products to children under 12. The goal of this initiative is to use
 advertising to help promote healthy dietary choices and healthy lifestyles
 among American children. While it remains the primary responsibility of
 parents to guide their children's behavior in these areas, industry members
 are voluntarily pursuing this initiative as a means of assisting parents in
 their efforts.
     Core Principles
     Companies participating in this initiative will publicly commit to
 advertising that will further the goal of promoting healthy dietary choices
 and healthy lifestyles to children under 12. These commitments will be set
 forth in an individual "Pledge" for each participant. Because companies and
 their product lines vary, company commitments will also vary. However, all
 commitments will be consistent with the following core principles:
     * Advertising Messaging.  Participants will devote at least 50%(1) of
       their television, radio, print and internet advertising primarily
       directed to children under 12(2) to advertising that will further the
       goal of promoting healthy dietary choices and healthy lifestyles.  This
       will be achieved in one of two ways (or some combination of both):
 
      (1) By advertising products that represent healthy dietary choices in
          accordance with company developed standards that are consistent with
          established scientific and/or government standards.  Examples of
          possible standards include:
 
          -- FDA defined "healthy" foods [21 CFR 101.65(d)(2)]
          -- Products that qualify for an FDA authorized health claim [21 CFR
             101.70-101.83]
          -- Products meeting FDA/USDA criteria for claims of "free," "low," or
             "reduced" calories, total fat, saturated fat, sodium or sugar
          -- Products that qualify for the USDA Healthier School Challenge
             Program criteria for Sales/Service of A La Carte and/or Vended
             Items
          -- Principles addressing recommended consumption by children under 12
             under USDA Dietary Guidelines and My Pyramid
          -- Products representing a portion control option, such as products
             advertised and sold in a package size of 100 calories or less
 
                                       or
 
      (2) By advertising that prominently includes healthy lifestyle messages
          designed to appeal to the intended audience, such as:
 
          -- messaging that encourages physical activity
          -- messaging that encourages good dietary habits, consistent with
             established scientific and/or government standards such as USDA
             Dietary Guidelines and My Pyramid
 
     * Use of Licensed Characters.  Participants will commit to reduce their
       use of third-party licensed characters(3) in advertising primarily
       directed to children under 12, unless such advertising complies with the
       messaging options set out above.  Each participant will state in its
       commitment the percentage reduction in its use of licensed characters.
 
     * Product Placement.  Participants will commit to not paying for or
       actively seeking to place their food or beverage products in the
       program/editorial content of any medium primarily directed to children
       under 12 for the purpose of promoting the sale of those products.
 
     * Use of Products in Interactive Games.  Participants will commit that, in
       any interactive game primarily directed to children under 12 where the
       company's food or beverage products are incorporated into the game, the
       interactive game must incorporate or be accompanied by products
       representing healthy dietary choices under #1 above or healthy lifestyle
       messaging under #2 above.
 
     * Advertising in Schools. Participants will commit to not advertising food
       or beverage products in elementary schools.(4)
 
     * Implementation.  Participants will formalize and publish their Pledge
       approximately 6 to 9 months following the establishment of the
       Monitoring/Enforcement entity described below.  The Pledge will include
       an implementation schedule for each commitment made by the participant.
 
     Monitoring/Enforcement
     Company Pledges, including the specific commitments that will identify
 the healthy dietary choices criteria, will be established in consultation
 with a new program administered by the Council of Better Business Bureaus.
     The new program will be responsible for monitoring company commitments.
 Monitoring will include the review of advertising materials, product
 information, and media impression information (submitted on a confidential
 basis) to confirm participant compliance. The program will also respond to
 public inquiries relating to compliance.
     The new program will develop procedures that provide for the expulsion
 of a company that does not comply with its Pledge after being given notice
 and an opportunity to bring its conduct into compliance, and notice of any
 expulsion to regulatory authorities such as the Federal Trade Commission
 under appropriate circumstances.
     The new program will publicly issue reports detailing its activities,
 including any expulsions or notices of such to regulatory authorities.
     The new program, in consultation with the participants, will
 periodically review its procedures and the overall impact of this
 initiative. The first such review shall be started after the new program
 has been operational for at least 3 years.
              Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative
                                 Company Quotes
     Cadbury Schweppes USA: "At Cadbury Schweppes, we have built lasting
 relationships with our consumers for more than 200 years by creating brands
 people love and operating ethically and responsibly. Our involvement in
 this Initiative reflects our values and our longstanding commitment to
 market our products in a responsible manner, and we are proud to work with
 our industry peers to continue exploring constructive solutions to consumer
 food issues."
     -- Gil Cassagne, President & CEO, Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages
     -- Brad Irwin, President, Cadbury Adams USA
     Campbell Soup Company: "For generations Campbell's soups have nourished
 America's children. As one of the first companies to use advertising to
 promote our brands to America's families, we have long supported
 responsible advertising practices -- especially with regard to how our
 brands are portrayed to kids. Campbell pledges to support these voluntary
 guidelines, which we believe will help families make better informed food
 choices. We are delighted to be a charter participant in this important
 CBBB initiative and welcome other food and beverage companies to join us in
 turning these guidelines into daily practice."
     -- Paul Alexander, Vice President - Global Advertising, Campbell Soup
 Company
     The Coca-Cola Company: "Coca-Cola North America supports this effort
 for a number of reasons; chief among them is the Initiative's goal of
 ensuring that America's kids are receiving balanced messages that promote
 healthy choices and active lifestyles. We are committed to improving
 childhood nutrition and hydration, and will continue to focus future
 innovation and marketing on developing products that meet their needs while
 also abiding by these practical guidelines. We are proud to be a part of
 this industry-wide effort to strengthen self-regulatory practices and
 ensure their effectiveness."
     -- John Hackett, Senior Vice President, Marketing, Coca-Cola North
 America
     General Mills, Inc.: "General Mills is proud to have helped advance the
 Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative. This Initiative
 underscores our strong commitment as a company to helping children and
 their families make healthy dietary and lifestyle choices. It also reflects
 the commitment of our industry to strong and effective self-regulation. We
 believe we can be part of the solution, and this is an important step
 forward."
     -- Mark Addicks, Chief Marketing Officer, General Mills
     The Hershey Company: "The Hershey Company is proud to join the CBBB in
 promoting healthy diets and healthy lifestyles for children. Our company
 has a long history of supporting youth fitness and encouraging responsible
 snack consumption. The Initiative being announced today is a significant
 step forward in both of these areas, providing parents and children with
 the information they need to live healthier lives."
     -- Tom Hernquist, Sr. Vice President, Global Chief Growth Officer, The
 Hershey Company
     Kellogg Company: "We have a longstanding commitment to responsible
 advertising. We are proud to be a charter member of this important
 Initiative and continue to play an active role in industry efforts to
 further strengthen the self-regulatory process."
     -- Jeff Montie, President of Kellogg North America and Executive Vice-
 President of Kellogg Company
     Kraft Foods Inc.: "This Initiative is consistent with what parents want
 from food and beverage companies today. That's why Kraft has been focusing
 our kids marketing on better-for-you products and healthy lifestyles. And,
 we're pleased to take the next step with our peers to voluntarily change
 the way leading food and beverage companies talk to America's children."
     -- Lance Friedmann, Senior Vice President of Health & Wellness and
 Sustainability, Kraft Foods Inc.
     McDonald's: "McDonald's is pleased to join in this voluntary Initiative
 to address the important subject of children's well-being. We support this
 self- regulatory approach and the significant accomplishment of defining a
 common criteria around which the industry can work. We have been actively
 engaged in working with NARC and the CBBB to develop this leadership
 program. This is another step in McDonald's ongoing efforts to address our
 customers' lifestyle needs by offering even more menu choice, providing
 accessible nutrition information and being an advocate for activity and
 fitness."
     -- Bill Lamar, Chief Marketing Officer, McDonald's USA
     PepsiCo, Inc.: "This initial move is a common sense solution for
 children to understand the right messaging on healthy products and more
 active lifestyles. We're committed to continue the work with our industry
 partners and the CBBB to ensure that this Initiative is effective in its
 effort to enact the highest of standards for children's advertising."
     -- Antonio Lucio, Senior Vice President, Chief Innovation and Health &
 Wellness Officer, PepsiCo
     Unilever: "At Unilever, we recognize that how we market our products is
 equally as important as the principles by which they are developed. We have
 an opportunity as an industry to be an agent of change and to take
 proactive steps to address and promote health and wellness among our
 consumers and customers. Our commitment to the Children's Food and Beverage
 Advertising Initiative is a clear example of putting into action our
 company mission of adding vitality to life. Our goal is to help all of our
 consumers to feel good, look good and get more out of life. We are
 committed to working with all of our constituents on this important
 initiative to share knowledge and to promote best practices in this area."
     -- Michael B. Polk, President, Unilever U.S.
 
     (1) This minimum percentage may be increased over time.
     (2) Measured in media impressions at the time the advertising is
         purchased, as determined by reliable third party data such as Nielsen
         ratings for TV, radio and Internet, and PIB (Publisher's Information
         Bureau) and MRI (Mediamark Research Inc.) data for print advertising.
         The 50% commitment will be calculated separately for each advertising
         medium.  Measurement for advertising on company owned websites will be
         determined in accordance with standards established as part of the
         company's Pledge.
     (3) This commitment does not apply to the use of licensed characters on
         packaging, provided the packaging does not appear in advertising
         directed to children under 12.  The limitation also does not apply to
         the use of company-owned characters.
     (4) This limitation will not apply to displays of food and beverage
         products, charitable fundraising activities, public service messaging,
         or items provided to school administrators.
 
 

SOURCE Council of Better Business Bureaus
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