NEWSWEEK MEDIA LEAD SHEET/February 7, 2005 Issue (on newsstands Monday, January 31).

Jan 30, 2005, 00:00 ET from Newsweek

    COVER: "The Insurgents. Who They Are-And Why the Elections Won't Stop
 Them" (p. 20). Baghdad Bureau Chief Rod Nordland, Baghdad Correspondent Babak
 Dehghanpisheh and Middle East Regional Editor Christopher Dickey examine the
 insurgency in Iraq, its tribal and political roots and look at its current
 strength. Interviews with guerrilla veterans of the Iraqi war, tribal leaders
 and Baathists as well as American, Coalition and Iraqi officials make it clear
 this is not one insurgency, but many. The report reveals that Saddam had put
 aside millions of dollars and enormous weapons caches to support a guerrilla
 war. Also, an interrogator of a would-be suicide bomber tells Newsweek the
 bomber claimed that Iraqi police had caught terrorist Abu Mussab al-Zarqawi in
 Fallujah last October, but despite a $25 million award-and perhaps not knowing
 who they had-they let him go. A videotape of a portion of the interrogation
 can be seen at http://www.Newsweek.com.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885867/site/newsweek/
 
     (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20050130/NYSU003 )
 
 
     WASHINGTON: "A Grim March of Missteps" (p. 28). National Security
 Correspondent John Barry and Senior Editor Michael Hirsh report that
 disbanding the Iraqi Army was only one small choice in a series of
 miscalculations that, as the chaos of Iraq deepened, encouraged more Iraqis
 and foreign terrorists to join the insurgency. The biggest problem, perhaps,
 is that the military and civilian sides of the occupation were never
 coordinated.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885830/site/newsweek/
 
     FAREED ZAKARIA: "Elections Are Not Democracy" (p. 30). Newsweek
 International Editor Fareed Zakaria writes that no matter how the voting turns
 out in Iraq, the prospects for genuine democracy are grim. Unless there is a
 major change in course, Iraq is on track to become another corrupt, oil-rich
 quasi-democracy, like Russia and Nigeria.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885455/site/newsweek/
 
     INTERVIEWS: "Strains With America"  (p. 31). Special Diplomatic
 Correspondent Lally Weymouth talks to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip
 Erdogan and director-general for the International Atomic Energy Agency
 Mohamed ElBaradei, two figures who have a strained relationship with
 Washington. Erdogan says the U.N. must be involved in Iraq in a more active
 way. ElBaradei talks about Iran. "You need inspections, but you need to also
 work with them diplomatically."
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885158/site/newsweek/
 
     POLITICS: "Bush's Hard Sell" (p. 36). Senior White House Correspondent
 Richard Wolffe, National Correspondent Tamara Lipper and Correspondent Holly
 Bailey report on the growing skepticism within the GOP about President Bush's
 social security reform proposal. The House and Senate Republicans are divided
 on the tactics to achieve the reform. For Democrats, that shows how little
 political capital Bush has as he starts his second term.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885059/site/newsweek/
 
     IMMIGRATION: "Crossing Over: Bush's Other Battle" (p. 38). Correspondent
 Holly Bailey and Washington Correspondent Daren Briscoe report that while
 President Bush is still pushing his immigration reform plan, members of the
 Congressional Immigration Reform Caucus view it as a backdoor amnesty scheme
 that would reward lawbreakers. For members of Congress already nervous about
 Bush's second-term agenda, immigration is just one more fissure in a united
 Republican front.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884660/site/newsweek/
 
     JONATHAN ALTER: "The End of 'Pay to Praise'" (p. 39). Columnist Jonathan
 Alter writes about the recent scandals of journalists getting paid by the
 people they cover. "Today, it's not even clear what a 'journalist' is and what
 'covering' something means," he writes. "Worse, there's a scary paradox at the
 heart of the otherwise exciting media revolution now underway: the most
 trusted news (by those who consume it) is often the most biased." He writes
 that the larger issue is what happens in a society when the facts are
 stretched and shaped. "Readers and viewers then trust those 'facts' because
 they are delivered by people who clearly agree with them and reinforce their
 prejudices, on the right and left."
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884762/site/newsweek/
 
     BUSINESS: "Fine Tuning A New Act" (p. 40). Senior Writer Johnnie L.
 Roberts reports that BET is getting ready for a makeover and just in time. The
 newest threat to its audience of 80 million homes is TV One, which just got a
 major boost when Rupert Murdoch's DirecTV agreed to carry the channel to most
 of its roughly 14 million customers in exchange for a stake. And BET's owner
 Viacom appears intent on developing the network into a brand with as much
 stature as its other media properties.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885035/site/newsweek/
 
     IDEAS: "Doubting Darwin" (p. 44). Senior Editor Jerry Adler reports on the
 renewed battle between teaching evolution and creationism, this time called
 "intelligent design," a critique of evolution couched in the language of
 science. Opponents say it's just another way of saying God created the world.
 Proponents regard it as an overdue challenge to Darwinism's monopoly over
 scientific discourse. The real stakes go beyond teaching I.D. in school. To
 accept it is to admit a supernatural process in the realm of science.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884904/site/newsweek/
 
     ENVIRONMENT: "A New Range War" (p. 51). Los Angeles Correspondent Andrew
 Murr reports on a controversial revision of a 1971 law that allows captured
 wild mustangs to be sold for slaughter if the horse is 10 or older or has
 proved unadoptable. The new rule applies to 8,400 horses in captivity and many
 more in the future. Cattle ranchers also complain that the 37,000 mustangs
 sharing public rangelands with several million head of cattle has resulted in
 overgrazing.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884764/site/newsweek/
 
     MEDICINE: "House Calls" (p. 52). General Editor Peg Tyre reports on a
 small but growing number of doctors, clinics and hospitals that are offering
 premium service to elite customers. About 250 so called "concierge physicians"
 exist in the U.S. today: these are primary care doctors who charge an annual
 retainer in exchange for same-day appointments, unhurried exams and house
 calls. Annual fees run as high as $25,000.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885323/site/newsweek/
 
     JUSTICE: "Mail Order Misery"  (p. 54). Washington Correspondent Daren
 Briscoe reports on the unregulated world of international matchmaking and
 Internet brides who come to America from economically-depressed countries
 seeking a husband, but end up in abusive relationships. Now, they're taking
 their spouses and the marriage brokers to court.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884657/site/newsweek/
 
     THE TECHNOLOGIST: "A Step Forward in The Voting Wars" (p. 12). Senior
 Editor Steven Levy writes that a coalition will be formed with the goal of
 setting voting-system standards that everyone can agree on-sort of a Consumer
 Reports for election machines.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885237/site/newsweek/
 
     THE TIP SHEET: "The Miscarriage Maze" (p. 63). Chicago Correspondent Karen
 Springen reports on miscarriages and how researchers are beginning to unravel
 the biological triggers and testing new approaches to prevention.  Plus: a
 surprise surplus of flu vaccine gives a second chance to those who missed
 getting a shot last fall.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3037969/site/newsweek/
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    COVER: "The Insurgents. Who They Are-And Why the Elections Won't Stop
 Them" (p. 20). Baghdad Bureau Chief Rod Nordland, Baghdad Correspondent Babak
 Dehghanpisheh and Middle East Regional Editor Christopher Dickey examine the
 insurgency in Iraq, its tribal and political roots and look at its current
 strength. Interviews with guerrilla veterans of the Iraqi war, tribal leaders
 and Baathists as well as American, Coalition and Iraqi officials make it clear
 this is not one insurgency, but many. The report reveals that Saddam had put
 aside millions of dollars and enormous weapons caches to support a guerrilla
 war. Also, an interrogator of a would-be suicide bomber tells Newsweek the
 bomber claimed that Iraqi police had caught terrorist Abu Mussab al-Zarqawi in
 Fallujah last October, but despite a $25 million award-and perhaps not knowing
 who they had-they let him go. A videotape of a portion of the interrogation
 can be seen at http://www.Newsweek.com.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885867/site/newsweek/
 
     (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20050130/NYSU003 )
 
 
     WASHINGTON: "A Grim March of Missteps" (p. 28). National Security
 Correspondent John Barry and Senior Editor Michael Hirsh report that
 disbanding the Iraqi Army was only one small choice in a series of
 miscalculations that, as the chaos of Iraq deepened, encouraged more Iraqis
 and foreign terrorists to join the insurgency. The biggest problem, perhaps,
 is that the military and civilian sides of the occupation were never
 coordinated.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885830/site/newsweek/
 
     FAREED ZAKARIA: "Elections Are Not Democracy" (p. 30). Newsweek
 International Editor Fareed Zakaria writes that no matter how the voting turns
 out in Iraq, the prospects for genuine democracy are grim. Unless there is a
 major change in course, Iraq is on track to become another corrupt, oil-rich
 quasi-democracy, like Russia and Nigeria.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885455/site/newsweek/
 
     INTERVIEWS: "Strains With America"  (p. 31). Special Diplomatic
 Correspondent Lally Weymouth talks to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip
 Erdogan and director-general for the International Atomic Energy Agency
 Mohamed ElBaradei, two figures who have a strained relationship with
 Washington. Erdogan says the U.N. must be involved in Iraq in a more active
 way. ElBaradei talks about Iran. "You need inspections, but you need to also
 work with them diplomatically."
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885158/site/newsweek/
 
     POLITICS: "Bush's Hard Sell" (p. 36). Senior White House Correspondent
 Richard Wolffe, National Correspondent Tamara Lipper and Correspondent Holly
 Bailey report on the growing skepticism within the GOP about President Bush's
 social security reform proposal. The House and Senate Republicans are divided
 on the tactics to achieve the reform. For Democrats, that shows how little
 political capital Bush has as he starts his second term.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885059/site/newsweek/
 
     IMMIGRATION: "Crossing Over: Bush's Other Battle" (p. 38). Correspondent
 Holly Bailey and Washington Correspondent Daren Briscoe report that while
 President Bush is still pushing his immigration reform plan, members of the
 Congressional Immigration Reform Caucus view it as a backdoor amnesty scheme
 that would reward lawbreakers. For members of Congress already nervous about
 Bush's second-term agenda, immigration is just one more fissure in a united
 Republican front.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884660/site/newsweek/
 
     JONATHAN ALTER: "The End of 'Pay to Praise'" (p. 39). Columnist Jonathan
 Alter writes about the recent scandals of journalists getting paid by the
 people they cover. "Today, it's not even clear what a 'journalist' is and what
 'covering' something means," he writes. "Worse, there's a scary paradox at the
 heart of the otherwise exciting media revolution now underway: the most
 trusted news (by those who consume it) is often the most biased." He writes
 that the larger issue is what happens in a society when the facts are
 stretched and shaped. "Readers and viewers then trust those 'facts' because
 they are delivered by people who clearly agree with them and reinforce their
 prejudices, on the right and left."
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884762/site/newsweek/
 
     BUSINESS: "Fine Tuning A New Act" (p. 40). Senior Writer Johnnie L.
 Roberts reports that BET is getting ready for a makeover and just in time. The
 newest threat to its audience of 80 million homes is TV One, which just got a
 major boost when Rupert Murdoch's DirecTV agreed to carry the channel to most
 of its roughly 14 million customers in exchange for a stake. And BET's owner
 Viacom appears intent on developing the network into a brand with as much
 stature as its other media properties.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885035/site/newsweek/
 
     IDEAS: "Doubting Darwin" (p. 44). Senior Editor Jerry Adler reports on the
 renewed battle between teaching evolution and creationism, this time called
 "intelligent design," a critique of evolution couched in the language of
 science. Opponents say it's just another way of saying God created the world.
 Proponents regard it as an overdue challenge to Darwinism's monopoly over
 scientific discourse. The real stakes go beyond teaching I.D. in school. To
 accept it is to admit a supernatural process in the realm of science.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884904/site/newsweek/
 
     ENVIRONMENT: "A New Range War" (p. 51). Los Angeles Correspondent Andrew
 Murr reports on a controversial revision of a 1971 law that allows captured
 wild mustangs to be sold for slaughter if the horse is 10 or older or has
 proved unadoptable. The new rule applies to 8,400 horses in captivity and many
 more in the future. Cattle ranchers also complain that the 37,000 mustangs
 sharing public rangelands with several million head of cattle has resulted in
 overgrazing.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884764/site/newsweek/
 
     MEDICINE: "House Calls" (p. 52). General Editor Peg Tyre reports on a
 small but growing number of doctors, clinics and hospitals that are offering
 premium service to elite customers. About 250 so called "concierge physicians"
 exist in the U.S. today: these are primary care doctors who charge an annual
 retainer in exchange for same-day appointments, unhurried exams and house
 calls. Annual fees run as high as $25,000.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885323/site/newsweek/
 
     JUSTICE: "Mail Order Misery"  (p. 54). Washington Correspondent Daren
 Briscoe reports on the unregulated world of international matchmaking and
 Internet brides who come to America from economically-depressed countries
 seeking a husband, but end up in abusive relationships. Now, they're taking
 their spouses and the marriage brokers to court.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6884657/site/newsweek/
 
     THE TECHNOLOGIST: "A Step Forward in The Voting Wars" (p. 12). Senior
 Editor Steven Levy writes that a coalition will be formed with the goal of
 setting voting-system standards that everyone can agree on-sort of a Consumer
 Reports for election machines.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6885237/site/newsweek/
 
     THE TIP SHEET: "The Miscarriage Maze" (p. 63). Chicago Correspondent Karen
 Springen reports on miscarriages and how researchers are beginning to unravel
 the biological triggers and testing new approaches to prevention.  Plus: a
 surprise surplus of flu vaccine gives a second chance to those who missed
 getting a shot last fall.
 
     http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3037969/site/newsweek/
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek