Obiang Calls For U.N. Security Council Reform

U.N. is "impotent observer" while great powers act, says Equatorial Guinea' President.

African leader condemns terrorism and highlights advances in his country.

UNITED NATIONS, Sept. 27, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- President Obiang Nguema Mbasogo called yesterday for reform of the United Nations to create a more democratic and representative body. In his remarks before the 68th U.N. General Assembly, the West African chief of state described as "incoherent" the idea of engaging in "indiscriminate destruction, to later plan reconstruction and reconciliation by outside parties."

"On the international level," he said, "we are very concerned about the United Nations' so-called humanitarian intervention, which, far from guaranteeing the human rights and welfare of the affected peoples, are more oriented toward imposing political systems and democracies by undeclared interests, totally ignoring the intangible principles of national sovereignty and dignity of peoples."

These actions occur "before the impotent gaze of the United Nations, whose role as arbiter and conciliator is being openly violated by special interests."

He described "a kind of cold war between those who proclaim themselves to be moral authorities and the majority who claim their right to freedom of action to guide the destinies of their peoples."

"Democracy is the maximum just expression of natural law," he said, and an "act of sovereign popular will. We do not see how democracy can be imposed on any country."

"Consequently," he said, "there can be no other alternative than to reform these organs, especially the Security Council, in order to make them more democratic and so that they will protect with impartiality the interests of all nations."

President Obiang condemned the recent terrorist attack in Kenya, calling it "a vile attack on the freedom and dignity of the Kenyan people." He called on the U.N. to "take severe measures against crimes of this nature."

He said that terrorism and war added to other woes affecting the developing world, including hunger and natural disasters, "causing human loss and forced displacement of large populations." Peace and security, therefore, are essential for development, he said, and have been major factors in building economic progress in his country.

"The political, economic, and sociocultural situation in Equatorial Guinea is positive and encouraging," he said, "because the country enjoys fruitful peace and stability, carries out a harmonious political development, and is maturing as a genuine national democracy; all of this has allowed us to undertake important infrastructure projects that allow the people to participate directly in the general growth of the country.

"Currently the country is putting in place important political reforms in consensus with all the political institutions," he said.

About Equatorial Guinea
The Republic of Equatorial Guinea (República de Guinea Ecuatorial) is the only Spanish-speaking country in Africa, and one of the smallest nations on the continent. In the late-1990s, American companies helped discover the country's oil and natural gas resources, which only within the last five years began contributing to the global energy supply. Equatorial Guinea is now working to serve as a pillar of stability and security in its region of West Central Africa. The country hosted the 2011 Summit of the African Union. For more information, visit http://www.guineaecuatorialpress.com.

SOURCE Republic of Equatorial Guinea



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