Philadelphians Asked to Sound Off on Childhood Obesity!

Keystone State Ranks 2nd Highest in Obesity-related Medical Costs, Draws

National Interest for Upcoming Town Hall Meeting on Childhood Obesity This

Saturday at Liacouras Center



Apr 16, 2007, 01:00 ET from Shaping America's Youth

    PHILADELPHIA, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to address an
 epidemic that defies a "quick fix," Shaping America's Youth(R) (SAY(R)) has
 chosen Philadelphia to host its third national town meeting this Saturday,
 April 21, 2007, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Liacouras Center, Temple
 University. All interested citizens are urged to attend the forum to
 brainstorm solutions to the national health crisis. Free breakfast and
 lunch will be served to participants and parking and childcare are free as
 well.
     To address the issues of childhood obesity organizers for the
 high-tech, grassroots town meetings are asking for hundreds of individuals
 from Philadelphia's diverse cross-section communities to sign up to
 participate in a day-long discussion. Previous SAY Town Meetings attracted
 as many as 1,000 participants in both Memphis and Dallas. Hundreds are
 likewise expected for the upcoming Philadelphia's meeting.
     Dr. Lisa Hark, of Lafayette Hill, a nutrition expert, author, and host
 of the TLC television show, "Honey, We're Killing the Kids," is one of the
 local experts who is available for interviews about the town meeting. (See
 below.)
     Shaping America's Youth (SAY) is a first-of-its-kind, public/private
 initiative designed to combine the efforts of numerous organizations and
 programs to create a "grassroots" plan for healthier children. SAY and its
 parent organization Shaping America's Health were chartered by the American
 Diabetes Association to address the prevention and management of America's
 weight crisis.
     Grave Concerns
     Nationally, if present trends continue, one out of every three
 Americans born today will develop diabetes, the leading cause of heart
 disease and stroke. That means a ten year old who develops diabetes as a
 child could lose almost 20 years of life expectancy according to the
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Pennsylvania follows this
 national trend; among school children, nearly 1 of every 3 is overweight.
     Even recent reports from the government indicate that the effects of
 childhood obesity go far beyond the health and well being of our children
 and youth. News reports have noted that a frightening percentage of
 military recruits weigh too much to be eligible for military service: "This
 is quickly becoming a national security issue for us," said Col. Gaston
 Bathalon, an Army nutrition expert. (UPI, March 30, 2007) By federal
 standards, 43 percent of young women and 18 percent of young men are too
 heavy for military service, Bathalon said.
     "Studies report that half of Philadelphia High School Students are not
 physically active and most have poor nutrition... and if you think
 healthcare is expensive now what will it be when this generation of
 overweight young people suffer complications over the next twenty years?"
 said Carmen Paris, MPH, Philadelphia Health Commissioner.
     Shaping America's Youth Philadelphia Town Meeting will be held on April
 21, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Liacouras Center at Temple
 University. SAY is urging residents from all neighborhoods of Philadelphia,
 from every educational and economic level, and representing all racial and
 ethnic groups to register online at www.shapingamericasyouth.org or by
 calling 800-SAY-9221. Free breakfast and lunch will be served to
 participants.
     SPECIAL NOTE: EXPERT ON CHILDHOOD OBESITY AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEWS ON
 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, THURSDAY, APRIL 19, AND FRIDAY, APRIL 20
     Dr. Lisa Hark, a renowned family nutrition expert with over 20 years of
 experience in nutrition counseling, is one of the organizers of the SHAPING
 AMERICA'S YOUTH (R) TOWN MEETING, scheduled for SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2007, 9
 A.M. TO 4 P.M. AT THE LIACOURAS CENTER AT TEMPLE UNIVERSITY. Dr. Hark,
 Director of the Nutrition Education and Prevention Program at the
 University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia for the past
 18 years, was the host for season one of the new television series "Honey,
 We're Killing the Kids," which airs on TLC.
     CONTACT:
     Claudia Johnson
     503-266-1776
     claudia@claudiajohnson.com
 
 

SOURCE Shaping America's Youth
    PHILADELPHIA, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- In an effort to address an
 epidemic that defies a "quick fix," Shaping America's Youth(R) (SAY(R)) has
 chosen Philadelphia to host its third national town meeting this Saturday,
 April 21, 2007, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Liacouras Center, Temple
 University. All interested citizens are urged to attend the forum to
 brainstorm solutions to the national health crisis. Free breakfast and
 lunch will be served to participants and parking and childcare are free as
 well.
     To address the issues of childhood obesity organizers for the
 high-tech, grassroots town meetings are asking for hundreds of individuals
 from Philadelphia's diverse cross-section communities to sign up to
 participate in a day-long discussion. Previous SAY Town Meetings attracted
 as many as 1,000 participants in both Memphis and Dallas. Hundreds are
 likewise expected for the upcoming Philadelphia's meeting.
     Dr. Lisa Hark, of Lafayette Hill, a nutrition expert, author, and host
 of the TLC television show, "Honey, We're Killing the Kids," is one of the
 local experts who is available for interviews about the town meeting. (See
 below.)
     Shaping America's Youth (SAY) is a first-of-its-kind, public/private
 initiative designed to combine the efforts of numerous organizations and
 programs to create a "grassroots" plan for healthier children. SAY and its
 parent organization Shaping America's Health were chartered by the American
 Diabetes Association to address the prevention and management of America's
 weight crisis.
     Grave Concerns
     Nationally, if present trends continue, one out of every three
 Americans born today will develop diabetes, the leading cause of heart
 disease and stroke. That means a ten year old who develops diabetes as a
 child could lose almost 20 years of life expectancy according to the
 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Pennsylvania follows this
 national trend; among school children, nearly 1 of every 3 is overweight.
     Even recent reports from the government indicate that the effects of
 childhood obesity go far beyond the health and well being of our children
 and youth. News reports have noted that a frightening percentage of
 military recruits weigh too much to be eligible for military service: "This
 is quickly becoming a national security issue for us," said Col. Gaston
 Bathalon, an Army nutrition expert. (UPI, March 30, 2007) By federal
 standards, 43 percent of young women and 18 percent of young men are too
 heavy for military service, Bathalon said.
     "Studies report that half of Philadelphia High School Students are not
 physically active and most have poor nutrition... and if you think
 healthcare is expensive now what will it be when this generation of
 overweight young people suffer complications over the next twenty years?"
 said Carmen Paris, MPH, Philadelphia Health Commissioner.
     Shaping America's Youth Philadelphia Town Meeting will be held on April
 21, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Liacouras Center at Temple
 University. SAY is urging residents from all neighborhoods of Philadelphia,
 from every educational and economic level, and representing all racial and
 ethnic groups to register online at www.shapingamericasyouth.org or by
 calling 800-SAY-9221. Free breakfast and lunch will be served to
 participants.
     SPECIAL NOTE: EXPERT ON CHILDHOOD OBESITY AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEWS ON
 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, THURSDAY, APRIL 19, AND FRIDAY, APRIL 20
     Dr. Lisa Hark, a renowned family nutrition expert with over 20 years of
 experience in nutrition counseling, is one of the organizers of the SHAPING
 AMERICA'S YOUTH (R) TOWN MEETING, scheduled for SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2007, 9
 A.M. TO 4 P.M. AT THE LIACOURAS CENTER AT TEMPLE UNIVERSITY. Dr. Hark,
 Director of the Nutrition Education and Prevention Program at the
 University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia for the past
 18 years, was the host for season one of the new television series "Honey,
 We're Killing the Kids," which airs on TLC.
     CONTACT:
     Claudia Johnson
     503-266-1776
     claudia@claudiajohnson.com
 
 SOURCE Shaping America's Youth