Postal Service to Begin Contract Negotiations With Its Four Largest Unions

First Time New Contracts Negotiated Separately With All Four Unions

Simultaneously



Aug 17, 2006, 01:00 ET from U.S. Postal Service

    WASHINGTON, Aug. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Postal Service is about to
 begin contract negotiations with its four largest unions. Current contracts
 with the National Association of Letter Carriers, AFL-CIO (NALC), American
 Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO (APWU), National Rural Letter Carriers'
 Association (NRLCA), and National Postal Mail Handlers Union (NPMHU) all
 expire at Midnight Nov. 20, 2006. This is the first time the Postal Service
 has separately negotiated new contracts with all these unions at the same
 time.
     The following schedule has been set for negotiation opening sessions:
     *  Aug. 21 -- NPMHU
     *  Aug. 25 -- NRLCA
     *  Aug. 28 -- NALC
     *  Aug. 29 -- APWU
     "We have worked successfully with our unions in the past to help
 transform the Postal Service and we hope to maintain this momentum in the
 current round of negotiations," said Doug Tulino, Vice President, Labor
 Relations, for the Postal Service. "Our ultimate goal is to continue to
 make the Postal Service a great place to work and to reach an agreement
 that is fair to our customers as well as our employees."
     The Postal Service employs more than 676,000 bargaining unit employees,
 with APWU, NALC, NRLCA and NPMHU accounting for more than 99.5% of these
 employees.
     Since 1775, the United States Postal Service and its predecessor, the
 Post Office Department, have connected friends, families, neighbors and
 businesses by mail. An independent federal agency that visits more than 144
 million homes and businesses every day, the Postal Service is the only
 service provider delivering to every address in the nation. It receives no
 taxpayer dollars for routine operations, but derives its operating revenues
 solely from the sale of postage, products and services. With annual
 revenues of $70 billion, it is the world's leading provider of mailing and
 delivery services, offering some of the most affordable postage rates in
 the world. The U.S. Postal Service delivers more than 46 percent of the
 world's mail volume-some 212 billion letters, advertisements, periodicals
 and packages a year-and serves ten million customers each day at its 37,000
 retail locations nationwide.
 
 

SOURCE U.S. Postal Service
    WASHINGTON, Aug. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Postal Service is about to
 begin contract negotiations with its four largest unions. Current contracts
 with the National Association of Letter Carriers, AFL-CIO (NALC), American
 Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO (APWU), National Rural Letter Carriers'
 Association (NRLCA), and National Postal Mail Handlers Union (NPMHU) all
 expire at Midnight Nov. 20, 2006. This is the first time the Postal Service
 has separately negotiated new contracts with all these unions at the same
 time.
     The following schedule has been set for negotiation opening sessions:
     *  Aug. 21 -- NPMHU
     *  Aug. 25 -- NRLCA
     *  Aug. 28 -- NALC
     *  Aug. 29 -- APWU
     "We have worked successfully with our unions in the past to help
 transform the Postal Service and we hope to maintain this momentum in the
 current round of negotiations," said Doug Tulino, Vice President, Labor
 Relations, for the Postal Service. "Our ultimate goal is to continue to
 make the Postal Service a great place to work and to reach an agreement
 that is fair to our customers as well as our employees."
     The Postal Service employs more than 676,000 bargaining unit employees,
 with APWU, NALC, NRLCA and NPMHU accounting for more than 99.5% of these
 employees.
     Since 1775, the United States Postal Service and its predecessor, the
 Post Office Department, have connected friends, families, neighbors and
 businesses by mail. An independent federal agency that visits more than 144
 million homes and businesses every day, the Postal Service is the only
 service provider delivering to every address in the nation. It receives no
 taxpayer dollars for routine operations, but derives its operating revenues
 solely from the sale of postage, products and services. With annual
 revenues of $70 billion, it is the world's leading provider of mailing and
 delivery services, offering some of the most affordable postage rates in
 the world. The U.S. Postal Service delivers more than 46 percent of the
 world's mail volume-some 212 billion letters, advertisements, periodicals
 and packages a year-and serves ten million customers each day at its 37,000
 retail locations nationwide.
 
 SOURCE U.S. Postal Service