SHRM Study Sheds Light on New HR Recruitment Techniques

So what's in your MySpace profile?



24 Jun, 2007, 01:00 ET from Society for Human Resource Management

    ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 24 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Respondents from
 high- tech organizations and organizations with large staff were more
 likely to have a ".jobs" domain, according to a recent study by the Society
 for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
     The 2007 Advances in E-Recruiting: Leveraging the .jobs Domain survey,
 queried HR professionals on the differences between organizations that
 utilize a ".jobs" domain compared to companies without such domains,
 shedding considerable light on new online search techniques used by
 recruiters. The Internet is used by most organizations as their primary
 method for recruiting.
     The three most commonly reported techniques or strategies used by
 respondents from all organizations to engage passive job candidates were:
 (1) viewing membership directories for associations and trade groups; (2)
 scanning social networking sites; and (3) mining industry-specific blogs,
 discussion forums, newsgroups or listservs.
     "The Internet has opened up a whole new set of opportunities through
 which HR recruiters can and are creatively sifting," said SHRM President
 and CEO Susan R. Meisinger.
     She added, "Who would have thought, for example, that social networking
 sites like MySpace -- often used as social hubs by so many young people --
 would become a rich source of background information for job recruiters?"
     The study also showed that HR respondents from all organizations (.jobs
 and non-.jobs organizations) said their most reliable sources for quality
 job candidates were: a) employee referrals; b) national online job boards
 (e.g. careerbuilder.com, Monster.com, HotJobs.com, etc.); and c) internal
 job postings.
     Other summary results from the survey are:
 
     -- Organizations with a ".jobs" domain reported they had better outcomes
        in recruiting due to advantages such as direct navigation and ease of
        use.  In addition, they were more likely to use tracking software that
        allows the electronic management of an organization's recruitment
        efforts.
     -- HR professionals from "non-.jobs" organizations cited the following as
        their top five greatest challenges: a) difficulty in attracting high
        quality candidates (67 percent); b) limited staff resources (39
        percent); c) difficulty in attracting diverse candidates (30 percent);
        and d) difficulty attracting enough candidates (30 percent); e)
        difficulty in managing volumes of resumes (27 percent).
     -- The most common metrics to measure efficiency of e-recruiting efforts
        from all organizations (.jobs and non-.jobs organizations) were: a)
        time to fill outstanding job vacancies; b) cost per hire; c) number of
        outstanding job vacancies; d) employee referral rate; and e) first-year
        turnover.
     SHRM commissioned the 2007 E-recruiting survey to gain insight into HR
 professionals' experiences with Internet recruiting at their organizations.
     Surveys were emailed to 3,000 randomly selected SHRM members and
 yielded 450 responses. In addition, surveys were sent to 1,050
 organizations that use a ".jobs" domain and yielded 152 responses. The
 survey results examine differences among .jobs and non-.jobs organizations
 by organization staff size and employment sector.
     A complete copy of the survey is available at
 http://www.shrm.org/surveys.
     The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world's largest
 association devoted to human resource management. Representing more than
 210,000 individual members, the Society's mission is both to serve human
 resource management professionals and to advance the profession. Founded in
 1948, SHRM currently has more than 550 affiliated chapters and members in
 more than 100 countries. Visit SHRM Online at http://www.shrm.org.
 
 

SOURCE Society for Human Resource Management
    ALEXANDRIA, Va., June 24 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Respondents from
 high- tech organizations and organizations with large staff were more
 likely to have a ".jobs" domain, according to a recent study by the Society
 for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
     The 2007 Advances in E-Recruiting: Leveraging the .jobs Domain survey,
 queried HR professionals on the differences between organizations that
 utilize a ".jobs" domain compared to companies without such domains,
 shedding considerable light on new online search techniques used by
 recruiters. The Internet is used by most organizations as their primary
 method for recruiting.
     The three most commonly reported techniques or strategies used by
 respondents from all organizations to engage passive job candidates were:
 (1) viewing membership directories for associations and trade groups; (2)
 scanning social networking sites; and (3) mining industry-specific blogs,
 discussion forums, newsgroups or listservs.
     "The Internet has opened up a whole new set of opportunities through
 which HR recruiters can and are creatively sifting," said SHRM President
 and CEO Susan R. Meisinger.
     She added, "Who would have thought, for example, that social networking
 sites like MySpace -- often used as social hubs by so many young people --
 would become a rich source of background information for job recruiters?"
     The study also showed that HR respondents from all organizations (.jobs
 and non-.jobs organizations) said their most reliable sources for quality
 job candidates were: a) employee referrals; b) national online job boards
 (e.g. careerbuilder.com, Monster.com, HotJobs.com, etc.); and c) internal
 job postings.
     Other summary results from the survey are:
 
     -- Organizations with a ".jobs" domain reported they had better outcomes
        in recruiting due to advantages such as direct navigation and ease of
        use.  In addition, they were more likely to use tracking software that
        allows the electronic management of an organization's recruitment
        efforts.
     -- HR professionals from "non-.jobs" organizations cited the following as
        their top five greatest challenges: a) difficulty in attracting high
        quality candidates (67 percent); b) limited staff resources (39
        percent); c) difficulty in attracting diverse candidates (30 percent);
        and d) difficulty attracting enough candidates (30 percent); e)
        difficulty in managing volumes of resumes (27 percent).
     -- The most common metrics to measure efficiency of e-recruiting efforts
        from all organizations (.jobs and non-.jobs organizations) were: a)
        time to fill outstanding job vacancies; b) cost per hire; c) number of
        outstanding job vacancies; d) employee referral rate; and e) first-year
        turnover.
     SHRM commissioned the 2007 E-recruiting survey to gain insight into HR
 professionals' experiences with Internet recruiting at their organizations.
     Surveys were emailed to 3,000 randomly selected SHRM members and
 yielded 450 responses. In addition, surveys were sent to 1,050
 organizations that use a ".jobs" domain and yielded 152 responses. The
 survey results examine differences among .jobs and non-.jobs organizations
 by organization staff size and employment sector.
     A complete copy of the survey is available at
 http://www.shrm.org/surveys.
     The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world's largest
 association devoted to human resource management. Representing more than
 210,000 individual members, the Society's mission is both to serve human
 resource management professionals and to advance the profession. Founded in
 1948, SHRM currently has more than 550 affiliated chapters and members in
 more than 100 countries. Visit SHRM Online at http://www.shrm.org.
 
 SOURCE Society for Human Resource Management