Sun Hits Key Milestone With 'CoolThreads'(TM) Servers, Solaris 10 By Surpassing One Million CPU Threads Shipped

Eco-Efficient Sun Fire(TM) T1000 and T2000 Servers Helped Prevent Emission

Of An Estimated Half A Billion Pounds Of CO2



Mar 20, 2007, 01:00 ET from Sun Microsystems, Inc.

    SANTA CLARA, Calif., March 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sun
 Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq:   SUNW) today announced that it has shipped over
 one million CPU "threads," and passed the half-billion dollar revenue mark
 for its Sun Fire(TM) T1000 and T2000 servers. When Sun introduced the chip
 multithreading (CMT) UltraSPARC(R) T1 processor and systems in late 2005,
 it demonstrated that its breakthrough multi-core, multi-thread approach
 could deliver superior performance while also being highly space and energy
 efficient. Sun's threaded approach starts with the Solaris(TM) 10 Operating
 System (OS), which treats each thread as a virtual CPU, thus enabling
 brutal efficiency and energy savings.
     To demonstrate the potential energy savings and eco-advantages of the
 Sun Fire T1000 and T2000 servers, Sun is estimating that since the first
 product was shipped over a half billion pounds of CO2 have been saved from
 entering the atmosphere. This is equivalent taking over twenty nine
 thousand cars off the road for a year, or not burning 17.7 million gallons
 of gasoline. With these potential savings to the environment, it's fitting
 that Sun's achievement coincides with International Earth Day.
     "While Solaris has been able to handle thousands of parallel threads
 for over a decade, we made the decision a few years ago to focus SPARC
 development on chip multi-threading. We bet that what will matter to CIOs
 is data center efficiency -- maximizing the amount of work that gets done
 at the lowest possible operating cost," said John Fowler, executive vice
 president of Sun's Systems business. "We now calculate that only 15 percent
 of the T1000 CPU processor cycles go unused, which compares very favorably
 to the 85 percent wasted cycles from competitive processors. In today's
 business environment, where electricity is expensive but the need for
 compute performance is increasing, we're convinced we've taken the best
 approach for customers, and, we hope, the planet as well."
     The UltraSPARC T1 processor, with its 32-threads, is just the first in
 a roadmap of CMT processors that Sun will introduce over the next two
 years. Sun plans to ship systems based on its 64-thread "Niagara 2"
 processor in the second-half of this calendar year. And Sun has
 successfully completed the tapeout (initial design completion for first
 fabrication) of its high-end "Rock" processor.
     Customers can evaluate the Sun Fire T1000 and T2000 servers for 60 days
 with no obligation to buy through Sun's "Try and Buy Program":
 (http://www.sun.com/tryandbuy/). The program and these servers have helped
 Sun reach customers outside its installed base, and have played an
 important role in helping Sun grow its server market share for four
 consecutive quarters, according to the most recent IDC Worldwide Quarterly
 Server Tracker. Customers that have purchased the Sun Fire T1000 and T2000
 servers include Fotolog, Joyent, City of Henderson, Lokalisten, DigiTar and
 PlanetOut.
     About Sun Microsystems, Inc.
     A singular vision -- "The Network Is The Computer" -- guides Sun in the
 development of technologies that power the world's most important markets.
 Sun's philosophy of sharing innovation and building communities is at the
 forefront of the next wave of computing: the Participation Age. Sun can be
 found in more than 100 countries and on the Web at http://sun.com. Sun, Sun
 Microsystems, the Sun logo, Solaris, Sun Network and The Network is the
 Computer are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Inc.
 in the United States and other countries. All SPARC trademarks are used
 under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC
 International, Inc. in the U.S. And other countries. Products bearing SPARC
 trademarks are based upon an architecture developed by Sun Microsystems,
 Inc.
         For more information
         Mark Richardson
         (650) 257-4038
         mark.richardson@sun.com
 
 

SOURCE Sun Microsystems, Inc.
    SANTA CLARA, Calif., March 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sun
 Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq:   SUNW) today announced that it has shipped over
 one million CPU "threads," and passed the half-billion dollar revenue mark
 for its Sun Fire(TM) T1000 and T2000 servers. When Sun introduced the chip
 multithreading (CMT) UltraSPARC(R) T1 processor and systems in late 2005,
 it demonstrated that its breakthrough multi-core, multi-thread approach
 could deliver superior performance while also being highly space and energy
 efficient. Sun's threaded approach starts with the Solaris(TM) 10 Operating
 System (OS), which treats each thread as a virtual CPU, thus enabling
 brutal efficiency and energy savings.
     To demonstrate the potential energy savings and eco-advantages of the
 Sun Fire T1000 and T2000 servers, Sun is estimating that since the first
 product was shipped over a half billion pounds of CO2 have been saved from
 entering the atmosphere. This is equivalent taking over twenty nine
 thousand cars off the road for a year, or not burning 17.7 million gallons
 of gasoline. With these potential savings to the environment, it's fitting
 that Sun's achievement coincides with International Earth Day.
     "While Solaris has been able to handle thousands of parallel threads
 for over a decade, we made the decision a few years ago to focus SPARC
 development on chip multi-threading. We bet that what will matter to CIOs
 is data center efficiency -- maximizing the amount of work that gets done
 at the lowest possible operating cost," said John Fowler, executive vice
 president of Sun's Systems business. "We now calculate that only 15 percent
 of the T1000 CPU processor cycles go unused, which compares very favorably
 to the 85 percent wasted cycles from competitive processors. In today's
 business environment, where electricity is expensive but the need for
 compute performance is increasing, we're convinced we've taken the best
 approach for customers, and, we hope, the planet as well."
     The UltraSPARC T1 processor, with its 32-threads, is just the first in
 a roadmap of CMT processors that Sun will introduce over the next two
 years. Sun plans to ship systems based on its 64-thread "Niagara 2"
 processor in the second-half of this calendar year. And Sun has
 successfully completed the tapeout (initial design completion for first
 fabrication) of its high-end "Rock" processor.
     Customers can evaluate the Sun Fire T1000 and T2000 servers for 60 days
 with no obligation to buy through Sun's "Try and Buy Program":
 (http://www.sun.com/tryandbuy/). The program and these servers have helped
 Sun reach customers outside its installed base, and have played an
 important role in helping Sun grow its server market share for four
 consecutive quarters, according to the most recent IDC Worldwide Quarterly
 Server Tracker. Customers that have purchased the Sun Fire T1000 and T2000
 servers include Fotolog, Joyent, City of Henderson, Lokalisten, DigiTar and
 PlanetOut.
     About Sun Microsystems, Inc.
     A singular vision -- "The Network Is The Computer" -- guides Sun in the
 development of technologies that power the world's most important markets.
 Sun's philosophy of sharing innovation and building communities is at the
 forefront of the next wave of computing: the Participation Age. Sun can be
 found in more than 100 countries and on the Web at http://sun.com. Sun, Sun
 Microsystems, the Sun logo, Solaris, Sun Network and The Network is the
 Computer are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Inc.
 in the United States and other countries. All SPARC trademarks are used
 under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC
 International, Inc. in the U.S. And other countries. Products bearing SPARC
 trademarks are based upon an architecture developed by Sun Microsystems,
 Inc.
         For more information
         Mark Richardson
         (650) 257-4038
         mark.richardson@sun.com
 
 SOURCE  Sun Microsystems, Inc.