Teamsters Demand Action from Coca-Cola on Global Rights Standards

Resolution Calls for Mediated Settlement



07 Feb, 2006, 00:00 ET from International Brotherhood of Teamsters

    WASHINGTON, Feb. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- In response to a growing international
 campaign by students, labor and other groups protesting human rights
 violations at Coca-Cola bottling facilities in Colombia and around the world,
 delegates to the Teamsters Brewery and Soft Drink Workers Conference
 unanimously endorsed a resolution today authorizing its leadership to seek a
 just resolution of this dispute between the Coca-Cola Company (NYSE:   KO) and
 student, labor and human rights groups.
     In the United States, student protests have led to universities such as
 Rutgers and the University of Michigan to cancel lucrative contracts for Coca-
 Cola products. More colleges and universities are likely to follow.
     "Coca-Cola's refusal to take the students seriously is having a direct
 impact on the company, its reputation and the Teamsters who service university
 contracts," said Joe Wojciechowski, President of Teamsters Local 812, which
 represents nearly 2,000 Coca-Cola workers in New York.
     "Our union brothers and sisters at Coca-Cola bottling facilities in
 Colombia have been threatened, kidnapped, tortured and murdered," said Jim
 Hoffa, Teamsters General President. "It's long past time for Coca-Cola to
 negotiate a global human rights agreement that will protect the rights and
 safety of workers who produce, package and distribute Coca-Cola products."
     Conference Director and Teamster International Vice President, Jack
 Cipriani, said Coca-Cola's labor abuses in the United States includes
 harassment, intimidation, discrimination and retaliation at CCE facilities as
 well as at Odwalla and Minute Maid operations-both wholly owned by the Coca-
 Cola Company.
     After the resolution was passed, delegates heard from Katishi Masemola,
 General Secretary of the Food and Allied Workers Union (FAWU), which
 represents approximately 6,000 Coca-Cola workers at three bottling plants in
 South Africa.  "Our members in South Africa support you in your demand that
 Coca-Cola institute a human rights policy," Katishi said. "No worker should
 have to endure the abuse that our fellow workers in Columbia have had. We look
 forward to working with the Teamsters Brewery and Soft Drink Conference
 towards concrete solutions to these human rights indignities."
     In an effort to reach out to the students who are spearheading campus
 protests against Coca-Cola, Teamsters will address a national meeting of the
 United Students Against Sweatshops later this week.
 
 

SOURCE International Brotherhood of Teamsters
    WASHINGTON, Feb. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- In response to a growing international
 campaign by students, labor and other groups protesting human rights
 violations at Coca-Cola bottling facilities in Colombia and around the world,
 delegates to the Teamsters Brewery and Soft Drink Workers Conference
 unanimously endorsed a resolution today authorizing its leadership to seek a
 just resolution of this dispute between the Coca-Cola Company (NYSE:   KO) and
 student, labor and human rights groups.
     In the United States, student protests have led to universities such as
 Rutgers and the University of Michigan to cancel lucrative contracts for Coca-
 Cola products. More colleges and universities are likely to follow.
     "Coca-Cola's refusal to take the students seriously is having a direct
 impact on the company, its reputation and the Teamsters who service university
 contracts," said Joe Wojciechowski, President of Teamsters Local 812, which
 represents nearly 2,000 Coca-Cola workers in New York.
     "Our union brothers and sisters at Coca-Cola bottling facilities in
 Colombia have been threatened, kidnapped, tortured and murdered," said Jim
 Hoffa, Teamsters General President. "It's long past time for Coca-Cola to
 negotiate a global human rights agreement that will protect the rights and
 safety of workers who produce, package and distribute Coca-Cola products."
     Conference Director and Teamster International Vice President, Jack
 Cipriani, said Coca-Cola's labor abuses in the United States includes
 harassment, intimidation, discrimination and retaliation at CCE facilities as
 well as at Odwalla and Minute Maid operations-both wholly owned by the Coca-
 Cola Company.
     After the resolution was passed, delegates heard from Katishi Masemola,
 General Secretary of the Food and Allied Workers Union (FAWU), which
 represents approximately 6,000 Coca-Cola workers at three bottling plants in
 South Africa.  "Our members in South Africa support you in your demand that
 Coca-Cola institute a human rights policy," Katishi said. "No worker should
 have to endure the abuse that our fellow workers in Columbia have had. We look
 forward to working with the Teamsters Brewery and Soft Drink Conference
 towards concrete solutions to these human rights indignities."
     In an effort to reach out to the students who are spearheading campus
 protests against Coca-Cola, Teamsters will address a national meeting of the
 United Students Against Sweatshops later this week.
 
 SOURCE  International Brotherhood of Teamsters