The African-American Experience Strikes a Chord With Inner-City Youth Choir At Black History Month Benefit Concert

* The Evolution of Music - 'A History Through its People' Includes

Performance By Jackson Browne



* PacifiCare CEO among honorees



Feb 17, 2004, 00:00 ET from Urban Entertainment Institute

    LOS ANGELES, Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The Urban Entertainment Institute
 (UEI) will hold a benefit concert celebrating Black History Month and the
 powerful influence African-Americans have had on music.
     The Evolution of Music -- "A History Through its People," which is the
 UEI's major fund-raiser of the year, will be held at the Scottish Rite Theatre
 (4357 Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles) at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 19.  Pat
 Prescott of 94.7 The Wave and gospel radio personality Edna Tatum will host.
 Honorees include musician Jackson Browne, Howard Phanstiel, president and
 chief executive officer of PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., Harvey Berg of ACI
 Billing Services Inc., and Bishop Kenneth C. Ulmer, pastor, Faithful Central
 Bible Church.  Jackson Browne, a longtime supporter of the Institute, will
 also perform in the show as a musical guest.
     Tickets are available to the public by calling 323-565-4007 or online at
 www.ticketweb.com .
     "The Evolution of Music -- 'A History Through its People' is a journey in
 time that showcases the African-American experience in music, from gospel and
 jazz to soul and R&B," said Fred Martin, musical executive director, youth
 advocate and UEI founder.  "The talented performers reflect the spirit and
 vitality that have been passed down through generations of legendary
 African-American singers.  This concert gives our students an opportunity to
 connect with their heritage and appreciate the contributions their forebears
 have made to music in America."
     The concert will honor Howard Phanstiel of PacifiCare Health Systems, one
 of the nation's largest consumer health organizations.  Last year, PacifiCare
 tapped members of the UEI's gospel choir, the Levite Camp, to sing the theme
 song, "From Now On," for the company's current television commercials.
     "The idea for our unique relationship with the Urban Entertainment
 Institute sprung up spontaneously as a result of the group's inspiring
 rendition of PacifiCare's brand theme song at our 25th birthday celebration,"
 said Phanstiel.  "The Urban Entertainment Institute harnesses the power of
 music to provide young people a sense of pride and hope and a chance at a
 better future.  Our support for the Urban Entertainment Institute flowed from
 PacifiCare's commitment to deliver on its brand promise that 'Caring is Good.
 Doing Something is Better.'"
     The Levite Camp has earned more than $50,000 in residuals from its
 performance in PacifiCare's television commercials.  These funds will be
 distributed among the students to help them further their education and pursue
 careers in entertainment.  The PacifiCare Foundation, the nonprofit,
 philanthropic arm of PacifiCare Health Systems, awarded the UEI its first
 corporate grant totaling $105,000 over a three-year period, helping the UEI
 underwrite its operating costs.
     In addition to the Foundation support, PacifiCare's African-American
 Health Solutions, a program committed to increasing health care access and
 service to the African-American community, sponsored 10 inner-city teens to
 attend the concert on behalf of the "I Have a Dream" Foundation.
     "PacifiCare is providing these kids a unique opportunity to discover a
 world beyond their own neighborhoods," said Martin.  "This is important
 because many of the kids we work with in South Los Angeles have not even been
 to the beach, much less a grand theater like the Scottish Rite."
 
     About the Urban Entertainment Institute
     The Urban Entertainment Institute serves more than 600 students, and in
 2004 will expand to accommodate 1,300 more students through in-school programs
 at eight middle schools in South Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley.  The
 UEI's after-school curriculum offers inner-city youth a creative outlet and an
 alternative to drugs and gang violence.  Classes are taught by founder Fred
 Martin and leading members of the entertainment and arts industry who
 volunteer their time to train and mentor students in the fields of voice,
 music, dance performance, public speaking, business management, production
 management and marketing.
 
 

SOURCE Urban Entertainment Institute
    LOS ANGELES, Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The Urban Entertainment Institute
 (UEI) will hold a benefit concert celebrating Black History Month and the
 powerful influence African-Americans have had on music.
     The Evolution of Music -- "A History Through its People," which is the
 UEI's major fund-raiser of the year, will be held at the Scottish Rite Theatre
 (4357 Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles) at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 19.  Pat
 Prescott of 94.7 The Wave and gospel radio personality Edna Tatum will host.
 Honorees include musician Jackson Browne, Howard Phanstiel, president and
 chief executive officer of PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., Harvey Berg of ACI
 Billing Services Inc., and Bishop Kenneth C. Ulmer, pastor, Faithful Central
 Bible Church.  Jackson Browne, a longtime supporter of the Institute, will
 also perform in the show as a musical guest.
     Tickets are available to the public by calling 323-565-4007 or online at
 www.ticketweb.com .
     "The Evolution of Music -- 'A History Through its People' is a journey in
 time that showcases the African-American experience in music, from gospel and
 jazz to soul and R&B," said Fred Martin, musical executive director, youth
 advocate and UEI founder.  "The talented performers reflect the spirit and
 vitality that have been passed down through generations of legendary
 African-American singers.  This concert gives our students an opportunity to
 connect with their heritage and appreciate the contributions their forebears
 have made to music in America."
     The concert will honor Howard Phanstiel of PacifiCare Health Systems, one
 of the nation's largest consumer health organizations.  Last year, PacifiCare
 tapped members of the UEI's gospel choir, the Levite Camp, to sing the theme
 song, "From Now On," for the company's current television commercials.
     "The idea for our unique relationship with the Urban Entertainment
 Institute sprung up spontaneously as a result of the group's inspiring
 rendition of PacifiCare's brand theme song at our 25th birthday celebration,"
 said Phanstiel.  "The Urban Entertainment Institute harnesses the power of
 music to provide young people a sense of pride and hope and a chance at a
 better future.  Our support for the Urban Entertainment Institute flowed from
 PacifiCare's commitment to deliver on its brand promise that 'Caring is Good.
 Doing Something is Better.'"
     The Levite Camp has earned more than $50,000 in residuals from its
 performance in PacifiCare's television commercials.  These funds will be
 distributed among the students to help them further their education and pursue
 careers in entertainment.  The PacifiCare Foundation, the nonprofit,
 philanthropic arm of PacifiCare Health Systems, awarded the UEI its first
 corporate grant totaling $105,000 over a three-year period, helping the UEI
 underwrite its operating costs.
     In addition to the Foundation support, PacifiCare's African-American
 Health Solutions, a program committed to increasing health care access and
 service to the African-American community, sponsored 10 inner-city teens to
 attend the concert on behalf of the "I Have a Dream" Foundation.
     "PacifiCare is providing these kids a unique opportunity to discover a
 world beyond their own neighborhoods," said Martin.  "This is important
 because many of the kids we work with in South Los Angeles have not even been
 to the beach, much less a grand theater like the Scottish Rite."
 
     About the Urban Entertainment Institute
     The Urban Entertainment Institute serves more than 600 students, and in
 2004 will expand to accommodate 1,300 more students through in-school programs
 at eight middle schools in South Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley.  The
 UEI's after-school curriculum offers inner-city youth a creative outlet and an
 alternative to drugs and gang violence.  Classes are taught by founder Fred
 Martin and leading members of the entertainment and arts industry who
 volunteer their time to train and mentor students in the fields of voice,
 music, dance performance, public speaking, business management, production
 management and marketing.
 
 SOURCE  Urban Entertainment Institute