The Coca-Cola Company Announces Formation Of Procurement Advisory Council

Noted Business and Community Leaders to Advise Company in Developing

Strategies for Increasing Procurement From Women and Minority Suppliers



Mar 27, 2001, 00:00 ET from The Coca-Cola Company

    ATLANTA, March 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE:   KO) today
 announced the formation of its Procurement Advisory Council, composed of
 respected and noted business and community leaders, to advise the Company on
 developing strategies for increasing purchases from women and minority
 business suppliers.
     In its five-year, $1 billion Empowerment and Entrepreneurship Program
 unveiled on May 16, 2000, Coca-Cola announced that it would increase spending
 with minority and women-owned businesses to $800 million over the years 2001-
 2005.
     Membership of the Council consists of two Company Officers -- James E.
 Chestnut, Executive Vice President, Operations Support, and Carl Ware,
 Executive Vice President, Global Public Affairs and Administration -- and
 eight external members: Thomas W. Dortch Jr., National Chairman of 100 Black
 Men of America, Inc; Lynn Martin, Former Secretary of the U.S. Department of
 Labor; Janice L. Mathis, General Counsel, Rainbow Push Coalition; Harriet R.
 Michel, President, National Minority Supplier Development Council; Subash
 Razdan, past Chair of the Board of Trustees, and past President of the
 National Federation of the Indian American Associations; Ramon M. Rodriguez,
 Executive Vice President and General Counsel, United States Hispanic Chamber
 of Commerce; Sara Martinez Tucker, CEO and President, Hispanic Scholarship
 Fund; and Richard B. Williams, Executive Director, American Indian College
 Fund.  Mr. Chestnut will serve as Chair of the Council.  Weldon H. Latham,
 Senior Partner, Holland and Knight, a recognized expert on minority and female
 business matters, will provide counsel to the Company on this initiative.
     "I am absolutely delighted that we have successfully assembled such an
 esteemed group of individuals for our Procurement Advisory Council," said Doug
 Daft, chairman and chief executive officer, The Coca-Cola Company.  "Following
 our announcement in May, I asked James Chestnut to establish this Council and
 recruit for its membership the most respected and knowledgeable business and
 community leaders in the area of purchasing from minority and women-owned
 businesses.  This body will enable Coca-Cola to forge closer links to the
 communities we serve, take advantage of independent views and fresh
 approaches, and bring together the best thinking about ways in which we can
 use our purchasing programs to benefit everyone who is touched by our
 business.
     "Given the high caliber, unique skill and diversity of its members, I am
 more than confident that it will be able to fulfill these goals, and will help
 Coca-Cola meet, if not exceed, our five-year goal of $800 million in purchases
 from minority and women-owned businesses."
     The Procurement Advisory Council will provide guidance to the Company's
 management relating to procurement strategies and best practices.  It will
 also review the Company's procurement programs as they relate to the promotion
 of diversity, and in particular to the creation of a stronger supplier base
 among minority and women-owned suppliers in the U.S.
     The Council will meet three times a year in Atlanta, with members
 appointed for two-year terms.  The first meeting of the Council was held on
 December 4, 2000.
 
 Abbreviated Biographies of External Members
 of the Procurement Advisory Council
 
     Thomas W. Dortch Jr., is the National Chairman of the 100 Black Men of
 America, Inc.  During his 25-year career, Mr. Dortch has been involved in
 state and national politics: first as associate director of the Democratic
 Party of Georgia, where he assisted in the creation of the first charter for
 the State Party and helped write the first Affirmative Action and Compliance
 Review Program for the Party.  In 1978, Mr. Dortch began a 16-year career with
 U.S. Senator Sam Nunn, and in 1990 he became the first African-American in the
 nation to serve as State Director for the United States Senate.  In 1994, he
 was elected National President and Chairman of the Board of the 100 Black Men
 of America.  Under his leadership the organization has doubled in size and has
 established international chapters in Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean.
 
     Lynn Martin served as the 21st Secretary of Labor under President George
 Bush.  She currently chairs Deloitte and Touche's Council on the Advancement
 of Women, and is an Advisor to the Firm.  A professor at the J.L. Kellogg
 Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University, Ms. Martin is a
 regular panelist on Public Television's To The Contrary, and also appears on
 many other national television programs.  During her tenure as Secretary of
 Labor, Ms. Martin's achievements included Congressional passage of the
 administration's proposal for increased pension portability, and proposals to
 support a high-skills, high-paid workforce.  Prior to serving as Secretary of
 Labor, Ms. Martin represented the 16th District of Illinois in the U.S. House
 of Representatives from 1981-1991, becoming the first woman to achieve an
 elective leadership post in 1984, when her colleagues chose her to be Vice
 Chair of the House Republican Conference.
 
     Janice L. Mathis is General Counsel of Rainbow Push Coalition and the
 Citizenship Education Fund.  Following her law degree from the University of
 Georgia, Ms. Mathis founded a successful private practice, concentrating on
 the representation of non-profit organizations.  She has worked on numerous
 political campaigns, serving as Deputy Issues Director for the 1988 Dukakis-
 Bentsen campaign.  From 1988 to 1992, she served on the Rules Committee of the
 Democratic National Committee.  In 1989, Ms. Mathis was named to Good
 Housekeeping Magazine's 100 Young Women of Promise, and was a Community Hero
 Torchbearer for the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games.
 
     Harriet R. Michel is President of the National Minority Supplier
 Development Council (NMSDC), a private non-profit organization that expands
 business opportunities for minority-owned companies.  In 1998, NMSDC member
 corporations' purchases from minority-owned businesses totaled approximately
 $41 billion.  Ms. Michel has worked for over 30 years in the public sector,
 developing and managing programs that address major social concerns.  Prior to
 joining NMSDC in September 1988, Ms. Michel was a resident fellow at the
 Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.  From 1983 to 1988, Ms.
 Michel was president and chief executive officer of the New York Urban League.
 
     Subash Razdan is past Chair of the Board of Trustees, and past President
 of the National Federation of the Indian American Associations (NFIA), the
 largest Indian American umbrella organization in the U.S.  Mr. Razdan is
 regularly listed in Avenue magazine's "500 Most Influential Asian Americans,"
 and was recently invited by the White House to accompany President Bill
 Clinton on his historic visit to India, Bangladesh and Pakistan.  In 1996, Mr.
 Razdan served as the Attache for the Government of India for the 1996 Atlanta
 Olympics, and acted as the Chef de Mission for the Indian contingent of
 athletes and officials.  He has written editorials for the Atlanta Journal-
 Constitution and various Indian American newspapers and magazines, and he owns
 the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Network, producing the popular community
 television show "Namaste Bombay" on Media One in Georgia.
 
     Ramon M. Rodriguez is Executive Vice President and General Counsel of the
 United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC).  He has supervisory
 responsibility of the entire Washington, D.C. and Mexico City Staffs, and is
 responsible for all in-house and external legal matters, as well as serving as
 the principal legislative liaison between the Chamber and Members of Congress.
 Mr. Rodriguez came to the USHCC from The University of the City of New York,
 Eugenio Maria de Hostos Community College, where he was Director of Public
 Relations.  He is a member of the New Jersey State Bar Association, American
 Bar Association and Puerto Rican Bar Association, and is a Veteran of the
 Vietnam and Persian Gulf Wars, holding the rank of Major in the U.S. Army
 Reserves.
 
     Sara Martinez Tucker is CEO and President of the Hispanic Scholarship Fund
 (HSF), the country's premier Hispanic scholarship granting organization.
 Since its founding in 1975, HSF has awarded more than 41,000 scholarships
 totaling $50 million to deserving students.  Prior to joining HSF, Ms.
 Martinez Tucker spent sixteen years with AT&T, and in 1990 she became the
 first Hispanic female to reach AT&T's executive level.  In 1999, Ms. Martinez
 Tucker was included in Hispanic Business Magazine's 100 Most Influential
 Hispanics for the third consecutive year, and in 2000 she was named Hispanic
 Magazine's first ever Hispanic of the Year.
 
     Richard B. Williams is the Executive Director of American Indian College
 Fund, a national nonprofit that raises private support for 30 tribal colleges
 and universities in the United States.  As executive director of the Fund, he
 supervises a staff of 23 and is responsible for a $10 million annual budget
 and a multi-million dollar endowment.  Mr. Williams also teaches American
 Indian History at the graduate program in Indian Studies at the University of
 Denver, and was a consulting editor for the Discovery Channel series How the
 West Was Lost.  Prior to his appointment at the College Fund, Mr. Williams was
 the director of the Student Academic Service Center at the University of
 Colorado in Boulder.
 
     Weldon H. Latham is Senior Partner with Holland & Knight, LLP, the
 nation's fifth largest law firm.  Mr. Latham represents several Fortune 100
 companies and CEOs, minority-owned businesses, municipalities and trade
 associations in legal matters involving crisis management and diversity
 issues, acquisitions, mergers and financial transactions, and Federal
 procurement as well as Federal executive, legislative and regulatory matters.
 Mr. Latham serves as General Counsel of the National Coalition of Minority
 Business, is a member of the Small Business Administration National Advisory
 Council and advises the Congressional Black Caucus on minority procurement
 issues.  Mr. Latham has served as Assistant General Counsel, Office of
 Management and Budget during the Ford Administration, and as Acting Assistant
 Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, Department of Housing and
 Urban Development during the Carter Administration.  During the Bush
 Administration Mr. Latham served on a Department of Defense Advisory Committee
 on Procurement and Technical Data Rights.
 
 

SOURCE The Coca-Cola Company
    ATLANTA, March 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE:   KO) today
 announced the formation of its Procurement Advisory Council, composed of
 respected and noted business and community leaders, to advise the Company on
 developing strategies for increasing purchases from women and minority
 business suppliers.
     In its five-year, $1 billion Empowerment and Entrepreneurship Program
 unveiled on May 16, 2000, Coca-Cola announced that it would increase spending
 with minority and women-owned businesses to $800 million over the years 2001-
 2005.
     Membership of the Council consists of two Company Officers -- James E.
 Chestnut, Executive Vice President, Operations Support, and Carl Ware,
 Executive Vice President, Global Public Affairs and Administration -- and
 eight external members: Thomas W. Dortch Jr., National Chairman of 100 Black
 Men of America, Inc; Lynn Martin, Former Secretary of the U.S. Department of
 Labor; Janice L. Mathis, General Counsel, Rainbow Push Coalition; Harriet R.
 Michel, President, National Minority Supplier Development Council; Subash
 Razdan, past Chair of the Board of Trustees, and past President of the
 National Federation of the Indian American Associations; Ramon M. Rodriguez,
 Executive Vice President and General Counsel, United States Hispanic Chamber
 of Commerce; Sara Martinez Tucker, CEO and President, Hispanic Scholarship
 Fund; and Richard B. Williams, Executive Director, American Indian College
 Fund.  Mr. Chestnut will serve as Chair of the Council.  Weldon H. Latham,
 Senior Partner, Holland and Knight, a recognized expert on minority and female
 business matters, will provide counsel to the Company on this initiative.
     "I am absolutely delighted that we have successfully assembled such an
 esteemed group of individuals for our Procurement Advisory Council," said Doug
 Daft, chairman and chief executive officer, The Coca-Cola Company.  "Following
 our announcement in May, I asked James Chestnut to establish this Council and
 recruit for its membership the most respected and knowledgeable business and
 community leaders in the area of purchasing from minority and women-owned
 businesses.  This body will enable Coca-Cola to forge closer links to the
 communities we serve, take advantage of independent views and fresh
 approaches, and bring together the best thinking about ways in which we can
 use our purchasing programs to benefit everyone who is touched by our
 business.
     "Given the high caliber, unique skill and diversity of its members, I am
 more than confident that it will be able to fulfill these goals, and will help
 Coca-Cola meet, if not exceed, our five-year goal of $800 million in purchases
 from minority and women-owned businesses."
     The Procurement Advisory Council will provide guidance to the Company's
 management relating to procurement strategies and best practices.  It will
 also review the Company's procurement programs as they relate to the promotion
 of diversity, and in particular to the creation of a stronger supplier base
 among minority and women-owned suppliers in the U.S.
     The Council will meet three times a year in Atlanta, with members
 appointed for two-year terms.  The first meeting of the Council was held on
 December 4, 2000.
 
 Abbreviated Biographies of External Members
 of the Procurement Advisory Council
 
     Thomas W. Dortch Jr., is the National Chairman of the 100 Black Men of
 America, Inc.  During his 25-year career, Mr. Dortch has been involved in
 state and national politics: first as associate director of the Democratic
 Party of Georgia, where he assisted in the creation of the first charter for
 the State Party and helped write the first Affirmative Action and Compliance
 Review Program for the Party.  In 1978, Mr. Dortch began a 16-year career with
 U.S. Senator Sam Nunn, and in 1990 he became the first African-American in the
 nation to serve as State Director for the United States Senate.  In 1994, he
 was elected National President and Chairman of the Board of the 100 Black Men
 of America.  Under his leadership the organization has doubled in size and has
 established international chapters in Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean.
 
     Lynn Martin served as the 21st Secretary of Labor under President George
 Bush.  She currently chairs Deloitte and Touche's Council on the Advancement
 of Women, and is an Advisor to the Firm.  A professor at the J.L. Kellogg
 Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University, Ms. Martin is a
 regular panelist on Public Television's To The Contrary, and also appears on
 many other national television programs.  During her tenure as Secretary of
 Labor, Ms. Martin's achievements included Congressional passage of the
 administration's proposal for increased pension portability, and proposals to
 support a high-skills, high-paid workforce.  Prior to serving as Secretary of
 Labor, Ms. Martin represented the 16th District of Illinois in the U.S. House
 of Representatives from 1981-1991, becoming the first woman to achieve an
 elective leadership post in 1984, when her colleagues chose her to be Vice
 Chair of the House Republican Conference.
 
     Janice L. Mathis is General Counsel of Rainbow Push Coalition and the
 Citizenship Education Fund.  Following her law degree from the University of
 Georgia, Ms. Mathis founded a successful private practice, concentrating on
 the representation of non-profit organizations.  She has worked on numerous
 political campaigns, serving as Deputy Issues Director for the 1988 Dukakis-
 Bentsen campaign.  From 1988 to 1992, she served on the Rules Committee of the
 Democratic National Committee.  In 1989, Ms. Mathis was named to Good
 Housekeeping Magazine's 100 Young Women of Promise, and was a Community Hero
 Torchbearer for the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games.
 
     Harriet R. Michel is President of the National Minority Supplier
 Development Council (NMSDC), a private non-profit organization that expands
 business opportunities for minority-owned companies.  In 1998, NMSDC member
 corporations' purchases from minority-owned businesses totaled approximately
 $41 billion.  Ms. Michel has worked for over 30 years in the public sector,
 developing and managing programs that address major social concerns.  Prior to
 joining NMSDC in September 1988, Ms. Michel was a resident fellow at the
 Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.  From 1983 to 1988, Ms.
 Michel was president and chief executive officer of the New York Urban League.
 
     Subash Razdan is past Chair of the Board of Trustees, and past President
 of the National Federation of the Indian American Associations (NFIA), the
 largest Indian American umbrella organization in the U.S.  Mr. Razdan is
 regularly listed in Avenue magazine's "500 Most Influential Asian Americans,"
 and was recently invited by the White House to accompany President Bill
 Clinton on his historic visit to India, Bangladesh and Pakistan.  In 1996, Mr.
 Razdan served as the Attache for the Government of India for the 1996 Atlanta
 Olympics, and acted as the Chef de Mission for the Indian contingent of
 athletes and officials.  He has written editorials for the Atlanta Journal-
 Constitution and various Indian American newspapers and magazines, and he owns
 the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Network, producing the popular community
 television show "Namaste Bombay" on Media One in Georgia.
 
     Ramon M. Rodriguez is Executive Vice President and General Counsel of the
 United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC).  He has supervisory
 responsibility of the entire Washington, D.C. and Mexico City Staffs, and is
 responsible for all in-house and external legal matters, as well as serving as
 the principal legislative liaison between the Chamber and Members of Congress.
 Mr. Rodriguez came to the USHCC from The University of the City of New York,
 Eugenio Maria de Hostos Community College, where he was Director of Public
 Relations.  He is a member of the New Jersey State Bar Association, American
 Bar Association and Puerto Rican Bar Association, and is a Veteran of the
 Vietnam and Persian Gulf Wars, holding the rank of Major in the U.S. Army
 Reserves.
 
     Sara Martinez Tucker is CEO and President of the Hispanic Scholarship Fund
 (HSF), the country's premier Hispanic scholarship granting organization.
 Since its founding in 1975, HSF has awarded more than 41,000 scholarships
 totaling $50 million to deserving students.  Prior to joining HSF, Ms.
 Martinez Tucker spent sixteen years with AT&T, and in 1990 she became the
 first Hispanic female to reach AT&T's executive level.  In 1999, Ms. Martinez
 Tucker was included in Hispanic Business Magazine's 100 Most Influential
 Hispanics for the third consecutive year, and in 2000 she was named Hispanic
 Magazine's first ever Hispanic of the Year.
 
     Richard B. Williams is the Executive Director of American Indian College
 Fund, a national nonprofit that raises private support for 30 tribal colleges
 and universities in the United States.  As executive director of the Fund, he
 supervises a staff of 23 and is responsible for a $10 million annual budget
 and a multi-million dollar endowment.  Mr. Williams also teaches American
 Indian History at the graduate program in Indian Studies at the University of
 Denver, and was a consulting editor for the Discovery Channel series How the
 West Was Lost.  Prior to his appointment at the College Fund, Mr. Williams was
 the director of the Student Academic Service Center at the University of
 Colorado in Boulder.
 
     Weldon H. Latham is Senior Partner with Holland & Knight, LLP, the
 nation's fifth largest law firm.  Mr. Latham represents several Fortune 100
 companies and CEOs, minority-owned businesses, municipalities and trade
 associations in legal matters involving crisis management and diversity
 issues, acquisitions, mergers and financial transactions, and Federal
 procurement as well as Federal executive, legislative and regulatory matters.
 Mr. Latham serves as General Counsel of the National Coalition of Minority
 Business, is a member of the Small Business Administration National Advisory
 Council and advises the Congressional Black Caucus on minority procurement
 issues.  Mr. Latham has served as Assistant General Counsel, Office of
 Management and Budget during the Ford Administration, and as Acting Assistant
 Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, Department of Housing and
 Urban Development during the Carter Administration.  During the Bush
 Administration Mr. Latham served on a Department of Defense Advisory Committee
 on Procurement and Technical Data Rights.
 
 SOURCE  The Coca-Cola Company