The 'Howard Stern Factor' is Overrated: Few Americans Expect to Purchase Satellite Radio, a Survey by American Media Services Finds

Nearly Two-Thirds of Those Surveyed Say Radio Listening Habits Are About the

Same or Have Increased Over the Past Five Years



26 Jan, 2006, 00:00 ET from American Media Services

    CHARLESTON, S.C., Jan. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Despite recent media attention
 about shock jock Howard Stern's widely publicized transfer to satellite radio,
 a nationwide survey indicates a large majority of Americans (86 percent) are
 not likely to consider the purchase of satellite radio in the future because
 of his move.
     Broken down further, 69 percent of those responding said they were "not at
 all likely" to consider purchasing satellite, and 17 percent said they were
 "not very likely" to after Stern's move.  The respondents' negative reaction
 to the Stern question was even stronger than another question that asked their
 likelihood of paying for satellite service.
     In that question, respondents were first told that satellite radio usage
 requires the purchase of equipment and a monthly fee, then were asked if they
 were likely to purchase satellite radio over the next year.  Eighty-two
 percent said such a purchase was unlikely, with 64 percent saying they were
 "not at all likely," and 18 percent responding "not very likely."  Eighty-
 eight percent of those surveyed responded that they are not subscribers of
 satellite radio.
     "We have long suspected that all the national media interest in Stern and
 satellite radio did not reflect what was going on with the American consumer,"
 said Ed Seeger, President and Chief Executive Officer of American Media
 Services (AMS), which commissioned the survey.  "These are dynamic times for
 conventional broadcast radio; there are lots of new opportunities with the
 emerging technologies, and radio has proven again and again that it is here to
 stay."
     The survey also revealed that almost two-thirds of those surveyed -- 64
 percent -- responded that they are listening to radio more, or about the same
 amount of time, as they were five years ago.
 
                    AMS Findings Bolstered by Second Survey
     Seeger noted that the AMS findings are supported by another survey
 released in January by the Center for Media Research that found conventional
 radio listenership beginning to stabilize.  "This supporting finding is a
 result of radio owners' decisions to lower commercial loads and concentrate on
 content," he added.  "We believe that there are compelling numbers in these
 results that indicate radio will continue to be a strong contender for
 consumers' attention."
     The AMS survey was a random digital dial telephone survey of 1,008
 American adults that was conducted by Roper OmniTel, the weekly omnibus survey
 of GfK NOP of Princeton, N.J.  The survey was conducted over the weekends of
 January 13-15, 2006, and January 20-22, 2006.  A random sample of this size
 reflects American opinion within plus or minus three percentage points.
     Additional Stern-related findings indicated that only 12 percent of
 respondents were likely to consider purchasing satellite radio to listen to
 Stern.  Of those respondents, most fell into the 18-34 age group, and men
 outnumbered women two to one.  Outside of that age group, the respondents'
 likelihood of purchasing satellite because of Stern fell off sharply.
     "Listening to local radio continues to be a part of the American fabric,
 and this survey supports that," Seeger said.
 
                   What the Consumer Likes About Local Radio
     The survey also asked the 1,008 respondents what they liked best in
 conventional radio.  Thirty-three percent of them said "local traffic and
 weather information," while another 25 percent said they liked radio because
 "it's always available when you need it."  Thirteen percent said they liked
 radio because it helped connect them to events taking place in their
 community, and 10 percent said they liked radio because they knew they could
 get vital information from radio in case of an emergency.  As to what
 consumers did not like about radio, 57 percent responded that "the amount of
 time for commercials" is the highest on their lists.
     "This survey has reinforced what we have known for several years, that
 local radio has a unique and unmatched place in the American community," AMS's
 Seeger said.  "Other technologies are going to be there to compete, but radio
 has made some fundamental changes over the past couple of years, and I think
 the consumer knows that."
 
     AMS is a full-service radio brokerage, engineering and developmental
 engineering firm, and its developmental division leads the country in
 successfully implementing station upgrades by moving them into larger markets,
 dramatically increasing their value.  Since its founding in 1997, AMS has
 increased the value of 21 stations across the country by $205.1 million, and
 more than $200 million in proposed rulemakings are currently pending before
 the FCC.
 
                                   FACT SHEET
                      American Media Services Radio Index
                  A National Survey Conducted by Roper OmniTel
 
     * 86 percent of those surveyed are not likely to purchase satellite radio
       because of Howard Stern's move to satellite radio
     * 82 percent responded they are not likely to purchase equipment and pay a
       monthly fee to listen to satellite radio
     * 88 percent of those surveyed do not subscribe to satellite radio
     * 64 percent say they are listening to radio more or about the same amount
       of time as five years ago
     * Most frequently mentioned reasons for liking conventional broadcast
       radio included:
         * Local traffic and weather information (33 percent)
         * Radio is available when needed (25 percent)
         * Radio connects the listener to local community (13 percent)
         * Radio is there to help in an emergency (10 percent)
 
 
     Facts about the Survey
     * Survey was a random digital dial telephone survey of 1,008 Americans
     * Survey conducted by Roper OmniTel, the weekly omnibus survey of GfK NOP
       of Princeton, N.J.
     * Survey was conducted over the weekends of January 13-15, 2006, and
       January 20-22, 2006
     * A random survey sample of this size reflects accurate American opinion
       within plus or minus three percentage points
 
 

SOURCE American Media Services
    CHARLESTON, S.C., Jan. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Despite recent media attention
 about shock jock Howard Stern's widely publicized transfer to satellite radio,
 a nationwide survey indicates a large majority of Americans (86 percent) are
 not likely to consider the purchase of satellite radio in the future because
 of his move.
     Broken down further, 69 percent of those responding said they were "not at
 all likely" to consider purchasing satellite, and 17 percent said they were
 "not very likely" to after Stern's move.  The respondents' negative reaction
 to the Stern question was even stronger than another question that asked their
 likelihood of paying for satellite service.
     In that question, respondents were first told that satellite radio usage
 requires the purchase of equipment and a monthly fee, then were asked if they
 were likely to purchase satellite radio over the next year.  Eighty-two
 percent said such a purchase was unlikely, with 64 percent saying they were
 "not at all likely," and 18 percent responding "not very likely."  Eighty-
 eight percent of those surveyed responded that they are not subscribers of
 satellite radio.
     "We have long suspected that all the national media interest in Stern and
 satellite radio did not reflect what was going on with the American consumer,"
 said Ed Seeger, President and Chief Executive Officer of American Media
 Services (AMS), which commissioned the survey.  "These are dynamic times for
 conventional broadcast radio; there are lots of new opportunities with the
 emerging technologies, and radio has proven again and again that it is here to
 stay."
     The survey also revealed that almost two-thirds of those surveyed -- 64
 percent -- responded that they are listening to radio more, or about the same
 amount of time, as they were five years ago.
 
                    AMS Findings Bolstered by Second Survey
     Seeger noted that the AMS findings are supported by another survey
 released in January by the Center for Media Research that found conventional
 radio listenership beginning to stabilize.  "This supporting finding is a
 result of radio owners' decisions to lower commercial loads and concentrate on
 content," he added.  "We believe that there are compelling numbers in these
 results that indicate radio will continue to be a strong contender for
 consumers' attention."
     The AMS survey was a random digital dial telephone survey of 1,008
 American adults that was conducted by Roper OmniTel, the weekly omnibus survey
 of GfK NOP of Princeton, N.J.  The survey was conducted over the weekends of
 January 13-15, 2006, and January 20-22, 2006.  A random sample of this size
 reflects American opinion within plus or minus three percentage points.
     Additional Stern-related findings indicated that only 12 percent of
 respondents were likely to consider purchasing satellite radio to listen to
 Stern.  Of those respondents, most fell into the 18-34 age group, and men
 outnumbered women two to one.  Outside of that age group, the respondents'
 likelihood of purchasing satellite because of Stern fell off sharply.
     "Listening to local radio continues to be a part of the American fabric,
 and this survey supports that," Seeger said.
 
                   What the Consumer Likes About Local Radio
     The survey also asked the 1,008 respondents what they liked best in
 conventional radio.  Thirty-three percent of them said "local traffic and
 weather information," while another 25 percent said they liked radio because
 "it's always available when you need it."  Thirteen percent said they liked
 radio because it helped connect them to events taking place in their
 community, and 10 percent said they liked radio because they knew they could
 get vital information from radio in case of an emergency.  As to what
 consumers did not like about radio, 57 percent responded that "the amount of
 time for commercials" is the highest on their lists.
     "This survey has reinforced what we have known for several years, that
 local radio has a unique and unmatched place in the American community," AMS's
 Seeger said.  "Other technologies are going to be there to compete, but radio
 has made some fundamental changes over the past couple of years, and I think
 the consumer knows that."
 
     AMS is a full-service radio brokerage, engineering and developmental
 engineering firm, and its developmental division leads the country in
 successfully implementing station upgrades by moving them into larger markets,
 dramatically increasing their value.  Since its founding in 1997, AMS has
 increased the value of 21 stations across the country by $205.1 million, and
 more than $200 million in proposed rulemakings are currently pending before
 the FCC.
 
                                   FACT SHEET
                      American Media Services Radio Index
                  A National Survey Conducted by Roper OmniTel
 
     * 86 percent of those surveyed are not likely to purchase satellite radio
       because of Howard Stern's move to satellite radio
     * 82 percent responded they are not likely to purchase equipment and pay a
       monthly fee to listen to satellite radio
     * 88 percent of those surveyed do not subscribe to satellite radio
     * 64 percent say they are listening to radio more or about the same amount
       of time as five years ago
     * Most frequently mentioned reasons for liking conventional broadcast
       radio included:
         * Local traffic and weather information (33 percent)
         * Radio is available when needed (25 percent)
         * Radio connects the listener to local community (13 percent)
         * Radio is there to help in an emergency (10 percent)
 
 
     Facts about the Survey
     * Survey was a random digital dial telephone survey of 1,008 Americans
     * Survey conducted by Roper OmniTel, the weekly omnibus survey of GfK NOP
       of Princeton, N.J.
     * Survey was conducted over the weekends of January 13-15, 2006, and
       January 20-22, 2006
     * A random survey sample of this size reflects accurate American opinion
       within plus or minus three percentage points
 
 SOURCE  American Media Services