The Nation's Pediatricians Elect a New Leader

Jun 02, 2004, 01:00 ET from American Academy of Pediatrics

    CHICAGO, June 2 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
 today elected Newton Center, MA, pediatrician Eileen Ouellette, MD, JD, FAAP,
 as its new vice president.  The AAP is the nation's largest pediatric
 organization, with a membership of more than 57,000 primary care
 pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical
 specialists.
     Dr. Ouellette will take office as president-elect at the October 2004 AAP
 National Conference and Exhibition in San Francisco and will serve as the
 2005-2006 AAP president.  Dr. Ouellette will be the AAP's fourth female
 president since it was founded in 1930.
     After graduating from Smith College and Harvard Medical School, Dr.
 Ouellette completed residencies in pediatrics and child neurology at
 Massachusetts General Hospital.  She has a law degree from Suffolk University
 Law School, Boston, MA, and is a member of the Massachusetts Bar and the
 American Bar Association.  She has extensive experience advocating for
 children's health issues at the state and federal level.  She is retired from
 North Shore Children's Hospital in Salem, MA, where she was a pediatric
 neurologist.
     Active in the AAP Section on Neurology, Dr. Ouellette is a member of the
 Senior and International Child Health Sections, has served on Committees on
 Women in Pediatrics, Career Opportunities, the Council on Government Affairs,
 and the Council on Sections and Sections Management.  In addition to her AAP
 activities, she has held leadership positions in the Child Neurology Society
 and is on its Legislative Committee.
     Dr. Ouellette has a long-time commitment to the care of developmentally
 disabled children.  Says Dr. Ouellette, "I look forward to this opportunity to
 work toward achieving universal, quality health care for children, delivered
 in a medical home with appropriate reimbursement for pediatricians.  As an
 attorney, as well as a physician, I hope to build coalitions with the legal
 community to work together on issues of common interest, particularly those of
 juvenile justice, mental health, child abuse and foster care."
 
 

SOURCE American Academy of Pediatrics
    CHICAGO, June 2 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
 today elected Newton Center, MA, pediatrician Eileen Ouellette, MD, JD, FAAP,
 as its new vice president.  The AAP is the nation's largest pediatric
 organization, with a membership of more than 57,000 primary care
 pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical
 specialists.
     Dr. Ouellette will take office as president-elect at the October 2004 AAP
 National Conference and Exhibition in San Francisco and will serve as the
 2005-2006 AAP president.  Dr. Ouellette will be the AAP's fourth female
 president since it was founded in 1930.
     After graduating from Smith College and Harvard Medical School, Dr.
 Ouellette completed residencies in pediatrics and child neurology at
 Massachusetts General Hospital.  She has a law degree from Suffolk University
 Law School, Boston, MA, and is a member of the Massachusetts Bar and the
 American Bar Association.  She has extensive experience advocating for
 children's health issues at the state and federal level.  She is retired from
 North Shore Children's Hospital in Salem, MA, where she was a pediatric
 neurologist.
     Active in the AAP Section on Neurology, Dr. Ouellette is a member of the
 Senior and International Child Health Sections, has served on Committees on
 Women in Pediatrics, Career Opportunities, the Council on Government Affairs,
 and the Council on Sections and Sections Management.  In addition to her AAP
 activities, she has held leadership positions in the Child Neurology Society
 and is on its Legislative Committee.
     Dr. Ouellette has a long-time commitment to the care of developmentally
 disabled children.  Says Dr. Ouellette, "I look forward to this opportunity to
 work toward achieving universal, quality health care for children, delivered
 in a medical home with appropriate reimbursement for pediatricians.  As an
 attorney, as well as a physician, I hope to build coalitions with the legal
 community to work together on issues of common interest, particularly those of
 juvenile justice, mental health, child abuse and foster care."
 
 SOURCE  American Academy of Pediatrics