Thomson Learning Reveals Pilot Results Proving the Value of Integrating Digital Content into the Classroom

Study results show digital course content and tools improve comprehension,

retention and boost interest



Oct 18, 2005, 01:00 ET from Thomson Corporation

    STAMFORD, Conn., Oct. 18 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Thomson Learning, a
 part of the Thomson Corporation (NYSE:   TOC; Toronto), today announced
 conclusive results to a two-semester pilot at the University of Virginia (UVa)
 boasting direction-setting curriculum improvements through the use of
 technology. The introduction of new digitally rich instructional materials
 provided a proven net benefit both to students and to the instructors, paving
 the way for possible new and different learning environments for college
 students.
     During the fall 2005 and spring 2006 semesters, UVa, Thomson Learning,
 Microsoft and HP worked together in a pilot to determine whether integrating
 digitally rich content and technology tools into the curriculum improved
 student learning. The pilot aimed to identify what works and to provide a
 template for further development. In addition, the pilot was designed to
 determine the overall feasibility of incorporating new digital rich technology
 and resources into the college classroom. The pilot, including more than 400
 students and 5 professors, was a major success on all of these dimensions.
     Pilot results were positive and showed improved comprehension, retention
 and boosted interest from students when digital course content and tools are
 used in cooperation with traditional textbooks. In the fall semester, 75% of
 students in the pilot biochemistry course showed an improved ability to
 understand and 73% improved ability to remember material when the technology
 resources where incorporated. There was a demonstrated increase in student
 interest in the biochemistry courses of 80% in the fall semester. In addition,
 the piloted content and technology tools accounted for 64% of these students
 having reported a positive impact on their grades in the fall (see "Note to
 Editor" for more information).
     "As a teacher, I am always seeking ways to make course material come to
 life for my students. The rich digital content made available by Thomson
 Learning has great potential and shows strong results when integrated into the
 classroom," said Charles Grisham, professor of chemistry at the University of
 Virginia. "I used the materials extensively during my fall biochemistry course
 and, as a result, students showed vast improvements in their ability to
 understand and their ability to remember the course material."
     In the spring Introduction to Statistics course participating in the
 pilot, more than half of the students used one or more of the Thomson online
 resources. Among the most used online resource were the online quizzes, online
 problems and online worksheets. 62% of these students demonstrated an improved
 ability to understand the material using these new resources, and 42% reported
 an improved ability to remember the material.  Among the most impressive
 results was the impact on efficiency of learning, which yielded totals of 57%
 reported ability to learn more in less time.
     As pilots proceed at UVa and elsewhere, Thomson Learning Labs, based in
 Stamford, CT, will work closely with academic institutions and business
 partners to build electronic products that combine high-value content and
 applications to make institutions more effective, instructors more productive
 and improve student learning.  These collaborations will involve four-year
 colleges and universities, two-year community colleges, online distance-
 education programs and the for-profit post-secondary sector.  A key objective
 will be to measure the educational impact of next-generation tools for
 teaching and learning.
     Research was conducted by two independent research firms throughout both
 semesters in a series of faculty interviews, student online questionnaires,
 student focus groups, in-class observations, and student and faculty end-of-
 course evaluations.
 
     About The Thomson Corporation
     The Thomson Corporation (www.thomson.com), with 2004 revenues from
 continuing operations of $8.10 billion, is a global leader in providing
 integrated information solutions to business and professional customers. With
 operational headquarters in Stamford, Conn., Thomson (NYSE:   TOC; TSX: TOC) has
 approximately 40,000 employees and provides services in approximately 130
 countries. Its learning businesses and brands serve the needs of individuals,
 learning institutions, corporations and government agencies with products and
 services for both traditional and distributed learning.
     Research, commissioned by two firms:  ReedHaldyMcIntosh Associates of
 Philadelphia handled the logistics of the research, the student questionnaires
 and the focus groups and the analysis; the National Center for Higher
 Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) of Boulder, CO, compared student
 outcomes.
 
 

SOURCE Thomson Corporation
    STAMFORD, Conn., Oct. 18 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Thomson Learning, a
 part of the Thomson Corporation (NYSE:   TOC; Toronto), today announced
 conclusive results to a two-semester pilot at the University of Virginia (UVa)
 boasting direction-setting curriculum improvements through the use of
 technology. The introduction of new digitally rich instructional materials
 provided a proven net benefit both to students and to the instructors, paving
 the way for possible new and different learning environments for college
 students.
     During the fall 2005 and spring 2006 semesters, UVa, Thomson Learning,
 Microsoft and HP worked together in a pilot to determine whether integrating
 digitally rich content and technology tools into the curriculum improved
 student learning. The pilot aimed to identify what works and to provide a
 template for further development. In addition, the pilot was designed to
 determine the overall feasibility of incorporating new digital rich technology
 and resources into the college classroom. The pilot, including more than 400
 students and 5 professors, was a major success on all of these dimensions.
     Pilot results were positive and showed improved comprehension, retention
 and boosted interest from students when digital course content and tools are
 used in cooperation with traditional textbooks. In the fall semester, 75% of
 students in the pilot biochemistry course showed an improved ability to
 understand and 73% improved ability to remember material when the technology
 resources where incorporated. There was a demonstrated increase in student
 interest in the biochemistry courses of 80% in the fall semester. In addition,
 the piloted content and technology tools accounted for 64% of these students
 having reported a positive impact on their grades in the fall (see "Note to
 Editor" for more information).
     "As a teacher, I am always seeking ways to make course material come to
 life for my students. The rich digital content made available by Thomson
 Learning has great potential and shows strong results when integrated into the
 classroom," said Charles Grisham, professor of chemistry at the University of
 Virginia. "I used the materials extensively during my fall biochemistry course
 and, as a result, students showed vast improvements in their ability to
 understand and their ability to remember the course material."
     In the spring Introduction to Statistics course participating in the
 pilot, more than half of the students used one or more of the Thomson online
 resources. Among the most used online resource were the online quizzes, online
 problems and online worksheets. 62% of these students demonstrated an improved
 ability to understand the material using these new resources, and 42% reported
 an improved ability to remember the material.  Among the most impressive
 results was the impact on efficiency of learning, which yielded totals of 57%
 reported ability to learn more in less time.
     As pilots proceed at UVa and elsewhere, Thomson Learning Labs, based in
 Stamford, CT, will work closely with academic institutions and business
 partners to build electronic products that combine high-value content and
 applications to make institutions more effective, instructors more productive
 and improve student learning.  These collaborations will involve four-year
 colleges and universities, two-year community colleges, online distance-
 education programs and the for-profit post-secondary sector.  A key objective
 will be to measure the educational impact of next-generation tools for
 teaching and learning.
     Research was conducted by two independent research firms throughout both
 semesters in a series of faculty interviews, student online questionnaires,
 student focus groups, in-class observations, and student and faculty end-of-
 course evaluations.
 
     About The Thomson Corporation
     The Thomson Corporation (www.thomson.com), with 2004 revenues from
 continuing operations of $8.10 billion, is a global leader in providing
 integrated information solutions to business and professional customers. With
 operational headquarters in Stamford, Conn., Thomson (NYSE:   TOC; TSX: TOC) has
 approximately 40,000 employees and provides services in approximately 130
 countries. Its learning businesses and brands serve the needs of individuals,
 learning institutions, corporations and government agencies with products and
 services for both traditional and distributed learning.
     Research, commissioned by two firms:  ReedHaldyMcIntosh Associates of
 Philadelphia handled the logistics of the research, the student questionnaires
 and the focus groups and the analysis; the National Center for Higher
 Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) of Boulder, CO, compared student
 outcomes.
 
 SOURCE  Thomson Corporation