Ugandan Woman Pleads Guilty to Identity Fraud and Bank Fraud, Reports U.S. Attorney

08 Feb, 2006, 00:00 ET from U.S. Attorney

    BOSTON, Feb. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- A woman from Uganda was convicted today in
 federal court in connection with her scheme to use bogus identification
 documents to conduct bank frauds.
     United States Attorney Michael J. Sullivan and Peter Zegarac, Inspector in
 Charge of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service in Boston, announced today that
 BILLY NSUBUGA, age 32, a citizen of Uganda, pleaded guilty before U.S.
 District Judge Edward F. Harrington to 6 counts of Bank Fraud, 5 counts of
 Mail Fraud, 5 counts of Identity Theft and 1 count of Identity Document Fraud.
     NSUBUGA waived indictment by the Grand Jury and pleaded guilty to an
 Information filed by the United States Attorney's Office.  The Information
 charged that NSUBUGA opened bank accounts in Massachusetts, New York and
 Connecticut with $50 cash deposits under the names of other women, using
 altered passports from Uganda, The Republic of Congo and South Africa, as well
 as a bogus identification document from California.  The Information further
 alleged that NSUBUGA wrote checks on the out-of-state accounts to make large
 but unsupported deposits at branches of Citizens Bank in the Boston area, then
 withdrew funds from Citizens Bank before Citizens was informed that
 insufficient funds were available to cover the out-of-state checks.  The
 charged offenses netted NSUBUGA more than $100,000 before the scheme was
 detected by the New York and Connecticut banks.
     Judge Harrington scheduled sentencing for April 27, 2006.   NSUBUGA faces
 up to 30 years and fine of $1 million on each of the Bank Fraud and Mail Fraud
 counts, up to 15 years with a fine of $250,000 on each of the Identity Theft
 counts, and 5 years with a fine of $250,000 on the Identity Document Fraud
 count.  NSUBUGA is also subject to up to 5 years of supervised release after
 serving a prison sentence.  Ultimately, NSUBUGA is subject to deportation
 after serving the sentences in this criminal case.
     The case was investigated by the United States Postal Inspection Service,
 with assistance from the Massachusetts Financial Crimes Task Force, the
 Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Diplomatic Security Services of the U.S.
 Department of State, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency, and
 the Housing and Urban Development Agency.  It is being prosecuted by Assistant
 U.S. Attorney Victor A. Wild of Sullivan's Economic Crimes Unit.
 
 

SOURCE U.S. Attorney
    BOSTON, Feb. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- A woman from Uganda was convicted today in
 federal court in connection with her scheme to use bogus identification
 documents to conduct bank frauds.
     United States Attorney Michael J. Sullivan and Peter Zegarac, Inspector in
 Charge of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service in Boston, announced today that
 BILLY NSUBUGA, age 32, a citizen of Uganda, pleaded guilty before U.S.
 District Judge Edward F. Harrington to 6 counts of Bank Fraud, 5 counts of
 Mail Fraud, 5 counts of Identity Theft and 1 count of Identity Document Fraud.
     NSUBUGA waived indictment by the Grand Jury and pleaded guilty to an
 Information filed by the United States Attorney's Office.  The Information
 charged that NSUBUGA opened bank accounts in Massachusetts, New York and
 Connecticut with $50 cash deposits under the names of other women, using
 altered passports from Uganda, The Republic of Congo and South Africa, as well
 as a bogus identification document from California.  The Information further
 alleged that NSUBUGA wrote checks on the out-of-state accounts to make large
 but unsupported deposits at branches of Citizens Bank in the Boston area, then
 withdrew funds from Citizens Bank before Citizens was informed that
 insufficient funds were available to cover the out-of-state checks.  The
 charged offenses netted NSUBUGA more than $100,000 before the scheme was
 detected by the New York and Connecticut banks.
     Judge Harrington scheduled sentencing for April 27, 2006.   NSUBUGA faces
 up to 30 years and fine of $1 million on each of the Bank Fraud and Mail Fraud
 counts, up to 15 years with a fine of $250,000 on each of the Identity Theft
 counts, and 5 years with a fine of $250,000 on the Identity Document Fraud
 count.  NSUBUGA is also subject to up to 5 years of supervised release after
 serving a prison sentence.  Ultimately, NSUBUGA is subject to deportation
 after serving the sentences in this criminal case.
     The case was investigated by the United States Postal Inspection Service,
 with assistance from the Massachusetts Financial Crimes Task Force, the
 Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Diplomatic Security Services of the U.S.
 Department of State, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency, and
 the Housing and Urban Development Agency.  It is being prosecuted by Assistant
 U.S. Attorney Victor A. Wild of Sullivan's Economic Crimes Unit.
 
 SOURCE  U.S. Attorney