Upstairs Downstairs: A Tale of Two Temperatures

Oct 16, 2000, 01:00 ET from Aprilaire

    MADISON, Wis., Oct. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Everyone knows temperatures in
 Maine are cooler than in Georgia.  But you can experience the same temperature
 difference right in your own home, according to Joe Hlavacek, product manager
 for Aprilaire(R) Zone Control Systems.
     "The upstairs of your home can be up to ten degrees warmer than
 downstairs," Hlavacek said.  "That's the difference between the average high
 temperatures in Portland and Atlanta in August."
     The solution to uneven temperatures is a temperature control system that
 divides the house into separate zones.  A zoned heating or cooling system can
 overcome the natural tendency for two-story homes to get too warm upstairs as
 warm air rises.
     "Zoning uses a system of thermostats with smart controls that signal
 dampers in your forced air ducts to deliver conditioned air only to the part
 of the house that needs it," Hlavacek said.  "The result is greater comfort
 and convenience as well as potential energy savings of up to 20 percent."
     Zoned heating or cooling systems use multiple thermostats that control
 temperature in separate areas.
     Without zoning, most homeowners have to rely on one centrally located
 thermostat to control the entire house, according to Hlavacek.  A single
 thermostat can result in upstairs/downstairs temperatures as different as the
 average high temperatures in Philadelphia and Memphis in December.
     In the past, zoning was primarily installed in expensive custom homes.
 The cost has come down recently with the introduction of systems like the
 Aprilaire(R) Zone Control System.  The Aprilaire system is engineered to be
 less expensive and more simplistic to install than earlier systems.
     To learn more about how zoning can make your home more comfortable, call
 the Aprilaire consumer information department at 800-545-2219 and ask for the
 free booklet, Facts About Zone Control.  Or visit their Internet site at
 http://www.aprilaire.com
 
 

SOURCE Aprilaire
    MADISON, Wis., Oct. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Everyone knows temperatures in
 Maine are cooler than in Georgia.  But you can experience the same temperature
 difference right in your own home, according to Joe Hlavacek, product manager
 for Aprilaire(R) Zone Control Systems.
     "The upstairs of your home can be up to ten degrees warmer than
 downstairs," Hlavacek said.  "That's the difference between the average high
 temperatures in Portland and Atlanta in August."
     The solution to uneven temperatures is a temperature control system that
 divides the house into separate zones.  A zoned heating or cooling system can
 overcome the natural tendency for two-story homes to get too warm upstairs as
 warm air rises.
     "Zoning uses a system of thermostats with smart controls that signal
 dampers in your forced air ducts to deliver conditioned air only to the part
 of the house that needs it," Hlavacek said.  "The result is greater comfort
 and convenience as well as potential energy savings of up to 20 percent."
     Zoned heating or cooling systems use multiple thermostats that control
 temperature in separate areas.
     Without zoning, most homeowners have to rely on one centrally located
 thermostat to control the entire house, according to Hlavacek.  A single
 thermostat can result in upstairs/downstairs temperatures as different as the
 average high temperatures in Philadelphia and Memphis in December.
     In the past, zoning was primarily installed in expensive custom homes.
 The cost has come down recently with the introduction of systems like the
 Aprilaire(R) Zone Control System.  The Aprilaire system is engineered to be
 less expensive and more simplistic to install than earlier systems.
     To learn more about how zoning can make your home more comfortable, call
 the Aprilaire consumer information department at 800-545-2219 and ask for the
 free booklet, Facts About Zone Control.  Or visit their Internet site at
 http://www.aprilaire.com
 
 SOURCE  Aprilaire