U.S. Adults With Diabetes Fear Blindness or Vision Loss More Than Premature Death

Many Respondents in International Diabetes Survey Worried About Quality of

Life



Dec 06, 2006, 00:00 ET from Lions Clubs International from ,Eli Lilly and Company

    CHICAGO and CAPE TOWN, South Africa, Dec. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- More U.S.
 adults with diabetes fear vision loss or blindness more than they fear
 dying prematurely, according to results from the U.S. portion of a
 seven-country survey presented today at the International Diabetes
 Federation's 19th World Diabetes Congress in Cape Town, South Africa. Many
 diabetes patients(1) feel they have been or would be affected by emotional
 challenges due to vision loss or blindness as a result of diabetes.
     Forty-one percent of U.S. adults with diabetes cited vision loss --
 including significant problems not correctible with glasses or contact
 lenses, or blindness -- as what they feared the most; and only 16 percent
 of U.S. respondents cited premature death as their greatest fear.
     Commissioned by Lions Clubs International and Eli Lilly and Company
 (NYSE:   LLY), the survey interviewed 250 U.S. adults with diabetes via
 telephone and was part of a larger global survey (n=1,458) on the
 experiences and understanding of diabetes complications of people living
 with the disease. Lions Clubs International partnered with Lilly, a
 worldwide leader in diabetes treatment, to commission this international
 patient survey to show its dedication to treating diabetic retinopathy,
 which can lead to loss of vision.
     "Managing diabetes carefully is essential for the prevention of
 complications, including vision loss and blindness," said Jimmy Ross,
 international president, Lions Clubs International. "This survey highlights
 the potential significant physical and emotional impact of vision loss on
 people with diabetes and thus underscores the importance of annual dilated
 eye exams for people with the disease."
     "While annual dilated eye exams are considered a standard of care for
 patients with diabetes, in reality, many patients do not get this annual
 exam. It is through these annual exams that patients at stages of more
 advanced diabetic retinopathy can be identified, and ophthalmologists have
 tools today that can reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients,"
 said Donald Fong, MD, MPH, assistant clinical professor of ophthalmology,
 University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine and director of
 clinical trials research, Kaiser Permanente, Southern California, who
 collaborated on the survey.
     Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in the
 U.S. Many U.S. adults with diabetes who say they have not yet experienced
 vision loss or blindness(2) reported being worried about losing the ability
 to conduct certain daily life activities, such as driving (65 percent),
 reading (61 percent) and continuing hobbies or interests (43 percent), as a
 result of vision loss or blindness due to diabetes. Also, U.S. adults with
 diabetes feel they would face or have faced emotional issues due to
 blindness or vision loss, including feelings of frustration (44 percent),
 depression (34 percent) and loss of independence (34 percent).
     Many medical studies have shown that diabetes has been linked to a
 variety of related complications(3). Nearly seven in 10 (69 percent) U.S.
 adults with diabetes were aware that vision loss or blindness are potential
 complications of diabetes. Sixty percent recognized kidney damage as a
 complication of diabetes, while less than half (49 percent) recognized
 stroke as a complication.
     In addition to the U.S., surveys were administered to adults with
 diabetes in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and South
 Africa. As in the U.S., the leading fear of people with diabetes in these
 countries was blindness or vision loss, followed by premature death. With
 regard to the emotional impact of vision loss due to diabetes, Americans
 with diabetes who have not yet experienced vision loss or blindness were
 less worried about losing their ability to continue with hobbies or
 interests than respondents from the other six countries, particularly South
 Africa(4) (U.S. 43 percent, U.K. 74 percent, Spain 67 percent, Italy 69
 percent, France 66 percent, Germany 70 percent, South Africa 89 percent).
     According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 20 million
 people in the United States, or seven percent of the population, have
 diabetes. While an estimated 14.6 million have been diagnosed, another 6.2
 million people are undiagnosed and have an increased risk of developing
 diabetes-related complications.(5)
     About the Survey
     Harris Interactive(R) fielded the telephone survey on behalf of the
 Lions Clubs International and Eli Lilly and Company between April 21 and
 May 30, 2006 among nationwide cross-sections of adults age 18+ with
 diabetes as follows in the following countries: United States (n=250), U.K.
 (n=200), Spain (n=204), Italy (n=202), France (n=201), Germany (n=201), and
 South Africa (n=200). The European data were weighted to be representative
 of the adult population with diabetes of each country on the basis of age,
 sex and type of diabetes. The U.S. data were weighted to be representative
 of the U.S. adult population with diabetes on the basis of region, age
 within gender, education, household income, race/ethnicity and type of
 diabetes. The South African data was not weighted and cannot be projected
 to the entire population of South African adults with diabetes.
     In theory, with probability samples of this size, one can say with 95
 percent certainty that the results for the French, Spanish, Italian, and
 German samples would have a sampling error of plus or minus 7 percentage
 points and sampling error for the U.S. and U.K. samples would be plus or
 minus 8 percentage points. Sampling error for data based on sub-samples may
 be higher and may vary. However, that does not take other sources of error
 into account.
     About Lions Club International
     Lions Clubs International is the world's largest service club
 organization with 1.3 million members in nearly 45,000 clubs in 200
 countries and geographic areas. In addition to its efforts toward
 conquering blindness, the organization has made a strong commitment to
 community service and helping youth throughout the world. Lions Clubs
 International Foundation provides funding to assist Lions in carrying out
 humanitarian projects, and has awarded nearly 8,000 grants totaling US $569
 million. To learn more about Lions SightFirst initiatives, visit
 www.lcif.org.
     About Eli Lilly and Company
     Lilly, a leading innovation-driven corporation, is developing a growing
 portfolio of first-in-class and best-in-class pharmaceutical products by
 applying the latest research from its own worldwide laboratories and from
 collaborations with eminent scientific organizations. Headquartered in
 Indianapolis, Ind., Lilly provides answers -- through medicines and
 information -- for some of the world's most urgent medical needs.
 Additional information about Lilly is available at www.lilly.com.
     Lilly's Leadership in Diabetes
     Through a long-standing commitment to diabetes care, Lilly provides
 patients with breakthrough treatments that enable them to live longer,
 healthier and fuller lives. Since 1923, Lilly has been the industry leader
 in pioneering therapies to help health care professionals improve the lives
 of people with diabetes, and research continues on innovative medicines to
 address the unmet needs of patients.
     About Harris Interactive
     Harris Interactive is the 12th largest and fastest-growing market
 research firm in the world. The company provides research-driven insights
 and strategic advice to help its clients make more confident decisions,
 which lead to measurable and enduring improvements in performance. Harris
 Interactive is widely known for The Harris Poll, one of the longest
 running, independent opinion polls and for pioneering online market
 research methods. The company has built what could conceivably be the
 world's largest panel of survey respondents, the Harris Poll Online. Harris
 Interactive serves clients worldwide through its United States, Europe and
 Asia offices, its wholly-owned subsidiary Novatris in France and through a
 global network of independent market research firms. The service bureau,
 HISB, provides its market research industry clients with mixed-mode data
 collection, panel development services as well as syndicated and tracking
 research consultation. More information about Harris Interactive may be
 obtained at www.harrisinteractive.com.
     (1) These findings are based on 94% of respondents who reported on the
         state of their vision -- those who did not select "don't know" or
         "decline to answer" when asked about the state of their current
         vision.
 
     (2) Caution should be exercised when interpreting these results as data
         are based on small sample size (n=88).
 
     (3) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Fact
         Sheet: General Information and  National  Estimates on Diabetes in the
         United States, 2000.  Available at:
         http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/estimates.htm.
         Last Accessed November 27, 2006.
 
     (4) The South African data was not weighted and represents only the
         opinions of the survey respondents
 
     (5) American Diabetes Association: Diabetes Statistics.  Available at:
         http://www.diabetes.org./diabetes-statistics.jsp.  Accessed 10/2/06.
 
 
     Contact: Nicole Brown                          J. Scott MacGregor
              Lions Clubs International Foundation  Eli Lilly and Company
              630-571-5466, ex. 386                 317-651-1494 (office)
                                                    317-440-4699 (mobile)
 
 

SOURCE Lions Clubs International; Eli Lilly and Company
    CHICAGO and CAPE TOWN, South Africa, Dec. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- More U.S.
 adults with diabetes fear vision loss or blindness more than they fear
 dying prematurely, according to results from the U.S. portion of a
 seven-country survey presented today at the International Diabetes
 Federation's 19th World Diabetes Congress in Cape Town, South Africa. Many
 diabetes patients(1) feel they have been or would be affected by emotional
 challenges due to vision loss or blindness as a result of diabetes.
     Forty-one percent of U.S. adults with diabetes cited vision loss --
 including significant problems not correctible with glasses or contact
 lenses, or blindness -- as what they feared the most; and only 16 percent
 of U.S. respondents cited premature death as their greatest fear.
     Commissioned by Lions Clubs International and Eli Lilly and Company
 (NYSE:   LLY), the survey interviewed 250 U.S. adults with diabetes via
 telephone and was part of a larger global survey (n=1,458) on the
 experiences and understanding of diabetes complications of people living
 with the disease. Lions Clubs International partnered with Lilly, a
 worldwide leader in diabetes treatment, to commission this international
 patient survey to show its dedication to treating diabetic retinopathy,
 which can lead to loss of vision.
     "Managing diabetes carefully is essential for the prevention of
 complications, including vision loss and blindness," said Jimmy Ross,
 international president, Lions Clubs International. "This survey highlights
 the potential significant physical and emotional impact of vision loss on
 people with diabetes and thus underscores the importance of annual dilated
 eye exams for people with the disease."
     "While annual dilated eye exams are considered a standard of care for
 patients with diabetes, in reality, many patients do not get this annual
 exam. It is through these annual exams that patients at stages of more
 advanced diabetic retinopathy can be identified, and ophthalmologists have
 tools today that can reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients,"
 said Donald Fong, MD, MPH, assistant clinical professor of ophthalmology,
 University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine and director of
 clinical trials research, Kaiser Permanente, Southern California, who
 collaborated on the survey.
     Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in the
 U.S. Many U.S. adults with diabetes who say they have not yet experienced
 vision loss or blindness(2) reported being worried about losing the ability
 to conduct certain daily life activities, such as driving (65 percent),
 reading (61 percent) and continuing hobbies or interests (43 percent), as a
 result of vision loss or blindness due to diabetes. Also, U.S. adults with
 diabetes feel they would face or have faced emotional issues due to
 blindness or vision loss, including feelings of frustration (44 percent),
 depression (34 percent) and loss of independence (34 percent).
     Many medical studies have shown that diabetes has been linked to a
 variety of related complications(3). Nearly seven in 10 (69 percent) U.S.
 adults with diabetes were aware that vision loss or blindness are potential
 complications of diabetes. Sixty percent recognized kidney damage as a
 complication of diabetes, while less than half (49 percent) recognized
 stroke as a complication.
     In addition to the U.S., surveys were administered to adults with
 diabetes in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and South
 Africa. As in the U.S., the leading fear of people with diabetes in these
 countries was blindness or vision loss, followed by premature death. With
 regard to the emotional impact of vision loss due to diabetes, Americans
 with diabetes who have not yet experienced vision loss or blindness were
 less worried about losing their ability to continue with hobbies or
 interests than respondents from the other six countries, particularly South
 Africa(4) (U.S. 43 percent, U.K. 74 percent, Spain 67 percent, Italy 69
 percent, France 66 percent, Germany 70 percent, South Africa 89 percent).
     According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 20 million
 people in the United States, or seven percent of the population, have
 diabetes. While an estimated 14.6 million have been diagnosed, another 6.2
 million people are undiagnosed and have an increased risk of developing
 diabetes-related complications.(5)
     About the Survey
     Harris Interactive(R) fielded the telephone survey on behalf of the
 Lions Clubs International and Eli Lilly and Company between April 21 and
 May 30, 2006 among nationwide cross-sections of adults age 18+ with
 diabetes as follows in the following countries: United States (n=250), U.K.
 (n=200), Spain (n=204), Italy (n=202), France (n=201), Germany (n=201), and
 South Africa (n=200). The European data were weighted to be representative
 of the adult population with diabetes of each country on the basis of age,
 sex and type of diabetes. The U.S. data were weighted to be representative
 of the U.S. adult population with diabetes on the basis of region, age
 within gender, education, household income, race/ethnicity and type of
 diabetes. The South African data was not weighted and cannot be projected
 to the entire population of South African adults with diabetes.
     In theory, with probability samples of this size, one can say with 95
 percent certainty that the results for the French, Spanish, Italian, and
 German samples would have a sampling error of plus or minus 7 percentage
 points and sampling error for the U.S. and U.K. samples would be plus or
 minus 8 percentage points. Sampling error for data based on sub-samples may
 be higher and may vary. However, that does not take other sources of error
 into account.
     About Lions Club International
     Lions Clubs International is the world's largest service club
 organization with 1.3 million members in nearly 45,000 clubs in 200
 countries and geographic areas. In addition to its efforts toward
 conquering blindness, the organization has made a strong commitment to
 community service and helping youth throughout the world. Lions Clubs
 International Foundation provides funding to assist Lions in carrying out
 humanitarian projects, and has awarded nearly 8,000 grants totaling US $569
 million. To learn more about Lions SightFirst initiatives, visit
 www.lcif.org.
     About Eli Lilly and Company
     Lilly, a leading innovation-driven corporation, is developing a growing
 portfolio of first-in-class and best-in-class pharmaceutical products by
 applying the latest research from its own worldwide laboratories and from
 collaborations with eminent scientific organizations. Headquartered in
 Indianapolis, Ind., Lilly provides answers -- through medicines and
 information -- for some of the world's most urgent medical needs.
 Additional information about Lilly is available at www.lilly.com.
     Lilly's Leadership in Diabetes
     Through a long-standing commitment to diabetes care, Lilly provides
 patients with breakthrough treatments that enable them to live longer,
 healthier and fuller lives. Since 1923, Lilly has been the industry leader
 in pioneering therapies to help health care professionals improve the lives
 of people with diabetes, and research continues on innovative medicines to
 address the unmet needs of patients.
     About Harris Interactive
     Harris Interactive is the 12th largest and fastest-growing market
 research firm in the world. The company provides research-driven insights
 and strategic advice to help its clients make more confident decisions,
 which lead to measurable and enduring improvements in performance. Harris
 Interactive is widely known for The Harris Poll, one of the longest
 running, independent opinion polls and for pioneering online market
 research methods. The company has built what could conceivably be the
 world's largest panel of survey respondents, the Harris Poll Online. Harris
 Interactive serves clients worldwide through its United States, Europe and
 Asia offices, its wholly-owned subsidiary Novatris in France and through a
 global network of independent market research firms. The service bureau,
 HISB, provides its market research industry clients with mixed-mode data
 collection, panel development services as well as syndicated and tracking
 research consultation. More information about Harris Interactive may be
 obtained at www.harrisinteractive.com.
     (1) These findings are based on 94% of respondents who reported on the
         state of their vision -- those who did not select "don't know" or
         "decline to answer" when asked about the state of their current
         vision.
 
     (2) Caution should be exercised when interpreting these results as data
         are based on small sample size (n=88).
 
     (3) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Fact
         Sheet: General Information and  National  Estimates on Diabetes in the
         United States, 2000.  Available at:
         http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/estimates.htm.
         Last Accessed November 27, 2006.
 
     (4) The South African data was not weighted and represents only the
         opinions of the survey respondents
 
     (5) American Diabetes Association: Diabetes Statistics.  Available at:
         http://www.diabetes.org./diabetes-statistics.jsp.  Accessed 10/2/06.
 
 
     Contact: Nicole Brown                          J. Scott MacGregor
              Lions Clubs International Foundation  Eli Lilly and Company
              630-571-5466, ex. 386                 317-651-1494 (office)
                                                    317-440-4699 (mobile)
 
 SOURCE Lions Clubs International; Eli Lilly and Company

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