World's Largest Rocket Contest Opens Registration

Students Across America Eligible for $60,000 in Prizes



07 Sep, 2006, 01:00 ET from Aerospace Industries Association

    ARLINGTON, Va., Sept. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Students across America can now
 compete in the 2007 Team America Rocketry Challenge. Registration for the
 world's largest rocket contest began Sept. 6.
     Applications for the fifth-annual challenge are now available online at
 http://www.rocketcontest.org, and are due by Nov. 15. Teams have until
 April 9, 2007, to qualify for the final round of competition scheduled for
 May 19 at Great Meadow in The Plains, Va. The winning teams share $60,000
 in cash and savings bonds, and NASA and the Defense Department contribute
 additional prizes. Registration costs $90.
     The new challenge for the teams building the handmade rockets is to
 launch them to a height of 850 feet while staying airborne for 45 seconds.
 As in the past, the rocket must return a raw-egg payload safely. Points are
 added for each foot or second away from the target, with the lowest total
 score winning. Cracked eggs disqualify the team.
     AIA sponsors the event along with the National Association of Rocketry.
 Co-sponsors are NASA, the Defense Department, American Association of
 Physics Teachers, and 39 AIA member companies.
     TARC is open to teams of students in grades 7-12 from any U.S. school
 or non-profit youth organization. Last year an estimated 7,000 students
 from across the country participated, with first-place honors going to a
 team from Statesville (North Carolina) Christian School. Since the contest
 began in 2003 an estimated 37,000 students have taken part.
     Visit on the web at http://www.rocketcontest.org to sign up for updates
 and view additional contest details.
     Founded in 1919, the Aerospace Industries Association represents the
 nation's leading manufacturers and suppliers of civil, military, and
 business aircraft, helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles, space systems,
 aircraft engines, materiel, and related components, equipment services, and
 information technology.
 
 

SOURCE Aerospace Industries Association
    ARLINGTON, Va., Sept. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Students across America can now
 compete in the 2007 Team America Rocketry Challenge. Registration for the
 world's largest rocket contest began Sept. 6.
     Applications for the fifth-annual challenge are now available online at
 http://www.rocketcontest.org, and are due by Nov. 15. Teams have until
 April 9, 2007, to qualify for the final round of competition scheduled for
 May 19 at Great Meadow in The Plains, Va. The winning teams share $60,000
 in cash and savings bonds, and NASA and the Defense Department contribute
 additional prizes. Registration costs $90.
     The new challenge for the teams building the handmade rockets is to
 launch them to a height of 850 feet while staying airborne for 45 seconds.
 As in the past, the rocket must return a raw-egg payload safely. Points are
 added for each foot or second away from the target, with the lowest total
 score winning. Cracked eggs disqualify the team.
     AIA sponsors the event along with the National Association of Rocketry.
 Co-sponsors are NASA, the Defense Department, American Association of
 Physics Teachers, and 39 AIA member companies.
     TARC is open to teams of students in grades 7-12 from any U.S. school
 or non-profit youth organization. Last year an estimated 7,000 students
 from across the country participated, with first-place honors going to a
 team from Statesville (North Carolina) Christian School. Since the contest
 began in 2003 an estimated 37,000 students have taken part.
     Visit on the web at http://www.rocketcontest.org to sign up for updates
 and view additional contest details.
     Founded in 1919, the Aerospace Industries Association represents the
 nation's leading manufacturers and suppliers of civil, military, and
 business aircraft, helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles, space systems,
 aircraft engines, materiel, and related components, equipment services, and
 information technology.
 
 SOURCE Aerospace Industries Association