A Simple Romp in the Garden Can Be Dangerous for Your Pet

PETsMART Offers Tips to Ensure a Safe and Enjoyable Outdoor Experience For

Pets and Their People



Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from PETsMART, Inc.

    PHOENIX, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Most pet owners believe their yard is a
 safe place for a pet to explore and spend time unattended.  But the fact is
 backyard gardens can play host to a number of lethal plants that can harm, and
 even kill, pets.
     Unsupervised, your pet could be at risk of escaping, ravishing your
 personal vegetable garden, or ingesting poisonous plants that occupy your
 yard.  Even common plants and vegetables can prove fatal to a pet.  Spring
 flowers such as Azaleas, Begonia and Hydrangea can cause kidney failure or
 even death if ingested.  Avocado plants are fatal to birds and may also cause
 kidney or organ failure; and pesticides are able to make even safe plants
 dangerous to pets.  You can make the backyard a safer place for pets by
 choosing pet-friendly plants and installing fences around gardens.  When
 spraying pesticides, remove all food and water bowls and toys, then wait until
 the spray dries -- or even until the next day -- before letting your pet out
 to play.  Keep your pet from eating your garden by giving them a plant of
 their own.  Plant catnip or edible grasses, such as oat grass, fescue or
 wheat, for your feline companion.  And if your dog digs, likes to jump fences
 or has other backyard behavior challenges, consider professional pet training.
     Tortoises can also benefit from a specialized garden.  According to Dr.
 Nick Saint-Erne, Quality Assurance Veterinarian for PETsMART, Inc., "Many
 people grow patches of alfalfa, parsley, or other green leafy vegetables for
 tortoises (and rabbits) to enjoy at their own pace.  Birds also appreciate
 fresh fruits and vegetables, and growing your own can provide an inexpensive
 source without residual insecticide or chemical contamination."
     You can also create a living garden by installing a koi pond.  Relatively
 easy to install and maintain, a koi pond brings in a dimension of moving
 water, waterfall sounds, and colorful fish that can be therapeutic for pets
 and people.
 
     To learn more about poisonous plants that could harm your pet, or to find
 the PETsMART store nearest you where you can find many of the tools mentioned
 above, please log onto www.petsmart.com.
     PETsMART, Inc. (Nasdaq:   PETM) is the largest specialty retailer of
 services and solutions for the lifetime needs of pets.  The company operates
 more than 545 pet superstores in the United States and Canada, as well as a
 large pet supply catalog business, and is a major investor in a leading online
 provider of pet products and information (www.petsmart.com).  PETsMART
 provides a broad range of competitively priced pet food and supplies, and
 offers full-service veterinary, grooming and pet training services.  Since
 1992, PETsMART Charities has donated more than $14 million to animal welfare
 programs and, through its in-store adoption programs, has saved the lives of
 more than 960,000 pets.
 
 

SOURCE PETsMART, Inc.
    PHOENIX, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Most pet owners believe their yard is a
 safe place for a pet to explore and spend time unattended.  But the fact is
 backyard gardens can play host to a number of lethal plants that can harm, and
 even kill, pets.
     Unsupervised, your pet could be at risk of escaping, ravishing your
 personal vegetable garden, or ingesting poisonous plants that occupy your
 yard.  Even common plants and vegetables can prove fatal to a pet.  Spring
 flowers such as Azaleas, Begonia and Hydrangea can cause kidney failure or
 even death if ingested.  Avocado plants are fatal to birds and may also cause
 kidney or organ failure; and pesticides are able to make even safe plants
 dangerous to pets.  You can make the backyard a safer place for pets by
 choosing pet-friendly plants and installing fences around gardens.  When
 spraying pesticides, remove all food and water bowls and toys, then wait until
 the spray dries -- or even until the next day -- before letting your pet out
 to play.  Keep your pet from eating your garden by giving them a plant of
 their own.  Plant catnip or edible grasses, such as oat grass, fescue or
 wheat, for your feline companion.  And if your dog digs, likes to jump fences
 or has other backyard behavior challenges, consider professional pet training.
     Tortoises can also benefit from a specialized garden.  According to Dr.
 Nick Saint-Erne, Quality Assurance Veterinarian for PETsMART, Inc., "Many
 people grow patches of alfalfa, parsley, or other green leafy vegetables for
 tortoises (and rabbits) to enjoy at their own pace.  Birds also appreciate
 fresh fruits and vegetables, and growing your own can provide an inexpensive
 source without residual insecticide or chemical contamination."
     You can also create a living garden by installing a koi pond.  Relatively
 easy to install and maintain, a koi pond brings in a dimension of moving
 water, waterfall sounds, and colorful fish that can be therapeutic for pets
 and people.
 
     To learn more about poisonous plants that could harm your pet, or to find
 the PETsMART store nearest you where you can find many of the tools mentioned
 above, please log onto www.petsmart.com.
     PETsMART, Inc. (Nasdaq:   PETM) is the largest specialty retailer of
 services and solutions for the lifetime needs of pets.  The company operates
 more than 545 pet superstores in the United States and Canada, as well as a
 large pet supply catalog business, and is a major investor in a leading online
 provider of pet products and information (www.petsmart.com).  PETsMART
 provides a broad range of competitively priced pet food and supplies, and
 offers full-service veterinary, grooming and pet training services.  Since
 1992, PETsMART Charities has donated more than $14 million to animal welfare
 programs and, through its in-store adoption programs, has saved the lives of
 more than 960,000 pets.
 
 SOURCE  PETsMART, Inc.

RELATED LINKS

http://www.petsmart.com