A Wine Before Its Time!

A Researcher From the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Has Created A

New White Wine That Has More Health Benefits Than Its French Red Counterpart



Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Technion Society

    HAIFA, Israel, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Viva la difference!  For years,
 the health benefits of French red wines have been the subject of numerous
 studies, many of which concluded that red wine helped to lower cholesterol
 oxidation -- a major contributor to artery blockage.
     But Professor Michael Aviram of the Technion Faculty of Medicine just
 might give the French a run for their money.  Next month he will unveil his
 creation of the first Israeli Kosher wine with the same benefits of red wine,
 and even more of its health-promoting chemicals than its French cousins.
     On Saturday, April 28, at 9 a.m., at the New York Academy of Sciences
 Alcohol and Wine International Meeting, Hyatt Rickeys, 4219 El Camino Real,
 Palo Alto, California, Professor Aviram will present his findings (samples
 included) to this major industry conference.  His ground-breaking research
 will be publicized in the August 2001 issue of the Journal of Agriculture and
 Food Chemistry.
     According to Professor Aviram, the intent of the research was to "provide
 an alternative to red wine, with the identical health benefits.
     Aviram used a process to extract from white grapes the flavonoids (natural
 chemicals that counteract the damaging effects of cholesterol oxidation) that
 will have positive health effects.  The new "healthy" white wine is currently
 being produced under the Israeli label, Binyamina.
     "Essentially, our research team put grape skins of Chardonnay or Muscat,
 which are white or yellow in color, in contact with alcohol for a short period
 of time," Aviram said.  "The alcohol extracted the skins flavonoids and
 produced white wine rich in potent antioxidants similar to these found in red
 wine," he added.
     Aviram said that red wine retains its flavonoids because the grape skins
 are left on for several weeks prior to the wine preparation.
     Since the skin of white grapes cannot be left on longer than 18 hours
 without compromising the taste and aroma in the wine, Aviram added alcohol
 naturally obtained from wine to the squeezed grapes during the preparation
 process.  This increased the flavonoids more than 5-fold, making them as
 potent as the much greater amount found in red wine.
     The new Israeli white wine, studied in conjunction with the Binyamina
 Winery in Carmel, Israel, has a slightly stronger alcohol content (16 percent
 versus 13 percent in most wines), but since not all of the grape sugar was
 converted into alcohol, the white wine is more appropriate as a dessert wine,
 for now.
     In a related study, Aviram's team found that Israeli wines contain a
 relatively higher content of flavonoids, a group of potent flavonoids, than
 those found in French wines.
     "We were curious about the "French paradox," and in 1995 we set out to
 understand why our red wine studies in 1995 found twice as much reduction in
 cholesterol oxidation as the French studies.  It turns out the difference lies
 not in our methods, but in the strength of the flavonoids found in Israeli
 grapes," Aviram explained.
     Aviram has been studying the effects on various foods for many years such
 as pomegranates, tomatoes and licorice, primarily related to cholesterol
 oxidation and cardio-vascular diseases.  He was the first researcher to prove
 that red wine reduces cholesterol oxidation and cardio-vascular diseases,
 especially arteriosclerosis, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the
 world.
     The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is Israel's leading scientific
 and technological center for applied research and education.  It commands a
 worldwide reputation for its pioneering work in computer science,
 biotechnology, water-resource management, materials engineering, aerospace and
 medicine.  The majority of the founders and managers of Israel's high-tech
 companies are Technion graduates.  The Technion's 19 facilities and
 30 research centers and institutes in Haifa are home to 13,000 students and
 700 faculty members.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X60517584
 
 

SOURCE American Technion Society
    HAIFA, Israel, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Viva la difference!  For years,
 the health benefits of French red wines have been the subject of numerous
 studies, many of which concluded that red wine helped to lower cholesterol
 oxidation -- a major contributor to artery blockage.
     But Professor Michael Aviram of the Technion Faculty of Medicine just
 might give the French a run for their money.  Next month he will unveil his
 creation of the first Israeli Kosher wine with the same benefits of red wine,
 and even more of its health-promoting chemicals than its French cousins.
     On Saturday, April 28, at 9 a.m., at the New York Academy of Sciences
 Alcohol and Wine International Meeting, Hyatt Rickeys, 4219 El Camino Real,
 Palo Alto, California, Professor Aviram will present his findings (samples
 included) to this major industry conference.  His ground-breaking research
 will be publicized in the August 2001 issue of the Journal of Agriculture and
 Food Chemistry.
     According to Professor Aviram, the intent of the research was to "provide
 an alternative to red wine, with the identical health benefits.
     Aviram used a process to extract from white grapes the flavonoids (natural
 chemicals that counteract the damaging effects of cholesterol oxidation) that
 will have positive health effects.  The new "healthy" white wine is currently
 being produced under the Israeli label, Binyamina.
     "Essentially, our research team put grape skins of Chardonnay or Muscat,
 which are white or yellow in color, in contact with alcohol for a short period
 of time," Aviram said.  "The alcohol extracted the skins flavonoids and
 produced white wine rich in potent antioxidants similar to these found in red
 wine," he added.
     Aviram said that red wine retains its flavonoids because the grape skins
 are left on for several weeks prior to the wine preparation.
     Since the skin of white grapes cannot be left on longer than 18 hours
 without compromising the taste and aroma in the wine, Aviram added alcohol
 naturally obtained from wine to the squeezed grapes during the preparation
 process.  This increased the flavonoids more than 5-fold, making them as
 potent as the much greater amount found in red wine.
     The new Israeli white wine, studied in conjunction with the Binyamina
 Winery in Carmel, Israel, has a slightly stronger alcohol content (16 percent
 versus 13 percent in most wines), but since not all of the grape sugar was
 converted into alcohol, the white wine is more appropriate as a dessert wine,
 for now.
     In a related study, Aviram's team found that Israeli wines contain a
 relatively higher content of flavonoids, a group of potent flavonoids, than
 those found in French wines.
     "We were curious about the "French paradox," and in 1995 we set out to
 understand why our red wine studies in 1995 found twice as much reduction in
 cholesterol oxidation as the French studies.  It turns out the difference lies
 not in our methods, but in the strength of the flavonoids found in Israeli
 grapes," Aviram explained.
     Aviram has been studying the effects on various foods for many years such
 as pomegranates, tomatoes and licorice, primarily related to cholesterol
 oxidation and cardio-vascular diseases.  He was the first researcher to prove
 that red wine reduces cholesterol oxidation and cardio-vascular diseases,
 especially arteriosclerosis, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the
 world.
     The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is Israel's leading scientific
 and technological center for applied research and education.  It commands a
 worldwide reputation for its pioneering work in computer science,
 biotechnology, water-resource management, materials engineering, aerospace and
 medicine.  The majority of the founders and managers of Israel's high-tech
 companies are Technion graduates.  The Technion's 19 facilities and
 30 research centers and institutes in Haifa are home to 13,000 students and
 700 faculty members.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X60517584
 
 SOURCE  American Technion Society