A.A. to the Rescue: Heroine of New Youth Novel Finds Long-Lost Uncle and New World of Friends

Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from Highlight's for Children

    HONESDALE, Pa., April 24 /PRNewswire/ -- "Groover's Heart," a novel for
 young people by Carol Crowe, is the heartwarming tale of 11-year-old
 Charlotte's search for "lost family."  "Groover's Heart," just published by
 Boyds Mills Press of Honesdale, Pa., is also a story full of love that gently
 introduces readers to the wonder of recovery from alcoholism.
     Mel B., a long-time A.A. member and author of five books on aspects of
 recovery from alcoholism, says of "Groover's Heart," "Here is an absorbing
 novel for youngsters, with rich, well-rounded characters and a plot with
 plenty of suspense.  And "Groover's Heart" familiarizes its readers with the
 genuine world of A.A.: kind, warmhearted men and women who have known trouble
 themselves and are ready to help at the ring of a telephone."
     Narrator Charlotte Dearborn opens "Groover's Heart" with this stunning
 news: "I died when I was two."  Since the day her parents drowned in a ferry
 accident, Charlotte, rescued from the accident and now eleven, has lived with
 her Aunt Violet and Uncle Ed. It is not a happy solution to being an orphan
 for Charlotte. Violet and Ed are rich, and life with them is elegant enough,
 but also lonely and pretty loveless. Violet is stern and prissy and obsessed
 with looking proper for the neighbors; Uncle Ed is oppressed by Violet and not
 much help to Charlotte even though he would like to be.
     Things begin to change when Charlotte finds out by accident that she has
 an uncle -- her mother's brother -- she hadn't known existed. Charlotte's
 intrepid journey to find her Uncle Groover yields a whole new world of family
 and friends. She not only discovers Groover but the Connecticut A.A. group
 he's very much a part of.
     Aunt Violet has kept the knowledge of Uncle "Groover" from Charlotte
 because she thinks he's a drunk, not knowing he has been sober for years. How
 Charlotte and her new A.A. friends put all to rights makes for a happy,
 whirlwind finish to "Groover's Heart."
     Boyds Mills Press, founded in 1990, is the book publishing arm of
 Highlights for Children, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio, the parent company of the
 magazine of the same name for youngsters.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X54218168
 
 

SOURCE Highlight's for Children
    HONESDALE, Pa., April 24 /PRNewswire/ -- "Groover's Heart," a novel for
 young people by Carol Crowe, is the heartwarming tale of 11-year-old
 Charlotte's search for "lost family."  "Groover's Heart," just published by
 Boyds Mills Press of Honesdale, Pa., is also a story full of love that gently
 introduces readers to the wonder of recovery from alcoholism.
     Mel B., a long-time A.A. member and author of five books on aspects of
 recovery from alcoholism, says of "Groover's Heart," "Here is an absorbing
 novel for youngsters, with rich, well-rounded characters and a plot with
 plenty of suspense.  And "Groover's Heart" familiarizes its readers with the
 genuine world of A.A.: kind, warmhearted men and women who have known trouble
 themselves and are ready to help at the ring of a telephone."
     Narrator Charlotte Dearborn opens "Groover's Heart" with this stunning
 news: "I died when I was two."  Since the day her parents drowned in a ferry
 accident, Charlotte, rescued from the accident and now eleven, has lived with
 her Aunt Violet and Uncle Ed. It is not a happy solution to being an orphan
 for Charlotte. Violet and Ed are rich, and life with them is elegant enough,
 but also lonely and pretty loveless. Violet is stern and prissy and obsessed
 with looking proper for the neighbors; Uncle Ed is oppressed by Violet and not
 much help to Charlotte even though he would like to be.
     Things begin to change when Charlotte finds out by accident that she has
 an uncle -- her mother's brother -- she hadn't known existed. Charlotte's
 intrepid journey to find her Uncle Groover yields a whole new world of family
 and friends. She not only discovers Groover but the Connecticut A.A. group
 he's very much a part of.
     Aunt Violet has kept the knowledge of Uncle "Groover" from Charlotte
 because she thinks he's a drunk, not knowing he has been sober for years. How
 Charlotte and her new A.A. friends put all to rights makes for a happy,
 whirlwind finish to "Groover's Heart."
     Boyds Mills Press, founded in 1990, is the book publishing arm of
 Highlights for Children, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio, the parent company of the
 magazine of the same name for youngsters.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X54218168
 
 SOURCE  Highlight's for Children