AAP Calls for Smoke-Free Environments for World Cancer Day

Feb 04, 2008, 00:00 ET from American Academy of Pediatrics

    WASHINGTON, Feb. 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Academy of
 Pediatrics (AAP) and its 60,000 member pediatricians join the International
 Union Against Cancer in its World Cancer Day initiative Monday, February 4,
 to promote smoke-free environments for children worldwide.
 
 
 
     "There is no safe level of tobacco smoke exposure," said Renee R.
 Jenkins, MD, FAAP, president of the AAP. "There is absolutely no safe way
 to smoke around children. Smoking in another room is not safe. Smoking near
 an open window does not reduce the danger. Tobacco toxins spread throughout
 the house and remain in the environment even after a cigarette is
 extinguished."
 
 
 
     For children, the health risks of secondhand smoke are even greater
 than they are for adults. Tobacco smoke puts young children at risk for
 increased rates of asthma and more severe asthma, and it increases the risk
 of pneumonia, ear infections and sudden infant death syndrome.
 
 
 
     Last month, the World Health Organization reported that almost half of
 the world's children are exposed to second-hand smoke. The American Academy
 of Pediatrics urges all who care about children to help eliminate
 children's exposure to tobacco smoke by helping parents quit. The AAP urges
 parents to adopt strict no-smoking policies everywhere a child spends time
 -- at home and at school, in babysitters' homes, in day care centers and in
 cars.
 
 
 
     The AAP thanks the International Union Against Cancer for its continued
 leadership in efforts to reduce children's exposure to tobacco, and is
 pleased to see increasing recognition of the need to protect children and
 teens from the largest avoidable cause of death worldwide. Only together
 can we eliminate tobacco and secondhand smoke from children's lives.
 
 
 
     The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary
 care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical
 specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well being of infants,
 children, adolescents and young adults. The AAP Julius B. Richmond Center,
 a national center of excellence funded by the Flight Attendant Medical
 Research Institute, is dedicated to the elimination of children's exposure
 to tobacco. The center is named for pediatrician and former Surgeon General
 Julius B. Richmond.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SOURCE American Academy of Pediatrics
    WASHINGTON, Feb. 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Academy of
 Pediatrics (AAP) and its 60,000 member pediatricians join the International
 Union Against Cancer in its World Cancer Day initiative Monday, February 4,
 to promote smoke-free environments for children worldwide.
 
 
 
     "There is no safe level of tobacco smoke exposure," said Renee R.
 Jenkins, MD, FAAP, president of the AAP. "There is absolutely no safe way
 to smoke around children. Smoking in another room is not safe. Smoking near
 an open window does not reduce the danger. Tobacco toxins spread throughout
 the house and remain in the environment even after a cigarette is
 extinguished."
 
 
 
     For children, the health risks of secondhand smoke are even greater
 than they are for adults. Tobacco smoke puts young children at risk for
 increased rates of asthma and more severe asthma, and it increases the risk
 of pneumonia, ear infections and sudden infant death syndrome.
 
 
 
     Last month, the World Health Organization reported that almost half of
 the world's children are exposed to second-hand smoke. The American Academy
 of Pediatrics urges all who care about children to help eliminate
 children's exposure to tobacco smoke by helping parents quit. The AAP urges
 parents to adopt strict no-smoking policies everywhere a child spends time
 -- at home and at school, in babysitters' homes, in day care centers and in
 cars.
 
 
 
     The AAP thanks the International Union Against Cancer for its continued
 leadership in efforts to reduce children's exposure to tobacco, and is
 pleased to see increasing recognition of the need to protect children and
 teens from the largest avoidable cause of death worldwide. Only together
 can we eliminate tobacco and secondhand smoke from children's lives.
 
 
 
     The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary
 care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical
 specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well being of infants,
 children, adolescents and young adults. The AAP Julius B. Richmond Center,
 a national center of excellence funded by the Flight Attendant Medical
 Research Institute, is dedicated to the elimination of children's exposure
 to tobacco. The center is named for pediatrician and former Surgeon General
 Julius B. Richmond.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 SOURCE American Academy of Pediatrics