Achilles Tendonitis Plagues Athletes and Others: A Monthly Foot Fact from Foot.com

Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from Foot.com

    TEANECK, N.J., April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- If you
 sometimes experience a burning pain above the heel with every step, you might
 have Achilles tendonitis.
     Achilles tendonitis is inflammation and degeneration of the Achilles
 tendon, which is located in the back of the leg and inserted into the heel.
 This tendon can be aggravated by running, jumping or other pounding sports, or
 can be injured by a single traumatic event.  Not stretching regularly before
 exercise, or wearing high heels that cause the tendon to shrink and become
 more vulnerable to injury, can also cause the condition. A heel bone
 deformity, or even prolonged periods of standing, can also cause symptoms.
     According to Dr. Suzanne Belyea, D.P.M., Medical Director of Foot.com,
 Achilles tendonitis causes a shooting, burning or extremely piercing pain.
 "The pain will be in the area in the back of the heel, and can also be
 perceived as tenderness upon rising first thing in the morning or after
 sitting for an extended period of time. If the condition is aggravated by a
 shoe rubbing against the tendon, you might see redness and feel soreness to
 the touch."
     Several factors can contribute to the onset of Achilles tendonitis,
 including over-pronation, or flat feet, which occurs when the arch of the foot
 collapses upon weight bearing, putting stress on the Achilles tendon.
 Improper shoe selection can also cause the condition.
      "You want to look for a good, supportive athletic shoe that has an
 'Achilles notch' to reduce rubbing and irritation in the area," Dr. Belyea
 says.
     Athletes, particularly distance runners, often experience Achilles
 tendonitis. It should not be left untreated, because the tendon can become
 weaker and eventually rupture. Athletes should stretch carefully to warm up
 the muscles before exercise and decrease the distance of their walk or run,
 then apply ice and avoid any uphill climbs.
     If over-pronation is the source of the problem, a ready-made posted
 orthotic can be used to correct it. A heel cup or heel cradle will elevate the
 heel to reduce stress and pressure on the tendon. If Achilles tendonitis is
 treated properly, relief should come in one to two weeks.
     If the problem persists, consult your foot doctor. For more information on
 Achilles tendonitis and other foot conditions, visit http://www.foot.com.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X28745559
 
 

SOURCE Foot.com
    TEANECK, N.J., April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- If you
 sometimes experience a burning pain above the heel with every step, you might
 have Achilles tendonitis.
     Achilles tendonitis is inflammation and degeneration of the Achilles
 tendon, which is located in the back of the leg and inserted into the heel.
 This tendon can be aggravated by running, jumping or other pounding sports, or
 can be injured by a single traumatic event.  Not stretching regularly before
 exercise, or wearing high heels that cause the tendon to shrink and become
 more vulnerable to injury, can also cause the condition. A heel bone
 deformity, or even prolonged periods of standing, can also cause symptoms.
     According to Dr. Suzanne Belyea, D.P.M., Medical Director of Foot.com,
 Achilles tendonitis causes a shooting, burning or extremely piercing pain.
 "The pain will be in the area in the back of the heel, and can also be
 perceived as tenderness upon rising first thing in the morning or after
 sitting for an extended period of time. If the condition is aggravated by a
 shoe rubbing against the tendon, you might see redness and feel soreness to
 the touch."
     Several factors can contribute to the onset of Achilles tendonitis,
 including over-pronation, or flat feet, which occurs when the arch of the foot
 collapses upon weight bearing, putting stress on the Achilles tendon.
 Improper shoe selection can also cause the condition.
      "You want to look for a good, supportive athletic shoe that has an
 'Achilles notch' to reduce rubbing and irritation in the area," Dr. Belyea
 says.
     Athletes, particularly distance runners, often experience Achilles
 tendonitis. It should not be left untreated, because the tendon can become
 weaker and eventually rupture. Athletes should stretch carefully to warm up
 the muscles before exercise and decrease the distance of their walk or run,
 then apply ice and avoid any uphill climbs.
     If over-pronation is the source of the problem, a ready-made posted
 orthotic can be used to correct it. A heel cup or heel cradle will elevate the
 heel to reduce stress and pressure on the tendon. If Achilles tendonitis is
 treated properly, relief should come in one to two weeks.
     If the problem persists, consult your foot doctor. For more information on
 Achilles tendonitis and other foot conditions, visit http://www.foot.com.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X28745559
 
 SOURCE  Foot.com