Adults Say Candy is a Welcome Guest During the Holidays; Kids Share Candy Cane Munching Strategies

Dec 09, 2002, 00:00 ET from National Confectioners Association

    VIENNA, Va., Dec. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- It's that time of the year again!
 Bells are jingling, turkeys are roasting, families are mingling and everyone's
 toasting a joyous holiday season.  According to a recent National
 Confectioners Association survey, candy and chocolate are welcome guests
 during holiday celebrations, from stuffing stockings to filling candy bowls,
 and of course, hanging those traditional candy canes on the Christmas tree.
     Eighty-nine percent of 1,000 adults surveyed said that candy plays a role
 in their winter holiday celebrations.  Filling candy dishes with festive
 candies topped the list of how candy was enjoyed, with 72 percent of
 respondents sharing this holiday tradition.  Giving or receiving a box of
 chocolates was also very popular, with 70 percent noting this as an
 anticipated holiday activity.  Sixty-three percent of the surveyed adults also
 said they either give or receive holiday stockings stuffed with candy and
 other goodies.
     The winter holidays of Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanza create the third
 biggest "candy holiday," in sales for the confectionery industry, with only
 Halloween (number one in sales) and Easter being bigger.  More boxed
 chocolates are sold between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day than any other
 time of year.  Also, more than 150 million chocolate Santas will be made for
 the season, along with 1.8 billion candy canes.
     When it comes to candy canes, kids have some definite ideas on the best
 way to eat them.  The National Confectioners Association recently surveyed 500
 kids ages 6-11 years old to get the scoop on the best way to enjoy a candy
 cane.  Most kids -- 54 percent -- say they eat their candy canes by sucking on
 them.  Biting/crunching candy canes came in second, with 24 percent of boys
 and girls saying this is the best way to devour a candy cane, and 19 percent
 noted that licking the candy cane was their preference (2 percent didn't know,
 1 percent said "other").  Boys were nearly twice as likely to crunch their
 candy canes than girls (31 percent vs. 17 percent).
     No matter how kids and adults enjoy their favorite holiday candies, one
 thing is certain -- they are a welcome part of the celebration, according to
 Larry Graham, president of the National Confectioners Association and
 Chocolate Manufacturers Association.
     "Candy is a fun food that has always been a part of special celebrations,"
 Graham says.  "Best of all, eaten in moderation, candy can fit any healthy
 lifestyle while adding pleasure to our lives."
 
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SOURCE National Confectioners Association
    VIENNA, Va., Dec. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- It's that time of the year again!
 Bells are jingling, turkeys are roasting, families are mingling and everyone's
 toasting a joyous holiday season.  According to a recent National
 Confectioners Association survey, candy and chocolate are welcome guests
 during holiday celebrations, from stuffing stockings to filling candy bowls,
 and of course, hanging those traditional candy canes on the Christmas tree.
     Eighty-nine percent of 1,000 adults surveyed said that candy plays a role
 in their winter holiday celebrations.  Filling candy dishes with festive
 candies topped the list of how candy was enjoyed, with 72 percent of
 respondents sharing this holiday tradition.  Giving or receiving a box of
 chocolates was also very popular, with 70 percent noting this as an
 anticipated holiday activity.  Sixty-three percent of the surveyed adults also
 said they either give or receive holiday stockings stuffed with candy and
 other goodies.
     The winter holidays of Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanza create the third
 biggest "candy holiday," in sales for the confectionery industry, with only
 Halloween (number one in sales) and Easter being bigger.  More boxed
 chocolates are sold between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day than any other
 time of year.  Also, more than 150 million chocolate Santas will be made for
 the season, along with 1.8 billion candy canes.
     When it comes to candy canes, kids have some definite ideas on the best
 way to eat them.  The National Confectioners Association recently surveyed 500
 kids ages 6-11 years old to get the scoop on the best way to enjoy a candy
 cane.  Most kids -- 54 percent -- say they eat their candy canes by sucking on
 them.  Biting/crunching candy canes came in second, with 24 percent of boys
 and girls saying this is the best way to devour a candy cane, and 19 percent
 noted that licking the candy cane was their preference (2 percent didn't know,
 1 percent said "other").  Boys were nearly twice as likely to crunch their
 candy canes than girls (31 percent vs. 17 percent).
     No matter how kids and adults enjoy their favorite holiday candies, one
 thing is certain -- they are a welcome part of the celebration, according to
 Larry Graham, president of the National Confectioners Association and
 Chocolate Manufacturers Association.
     "Candy is a fun food that has always been a part of special celebrations,"
 Graham says.  "Best of all, eaten in moderation, candy can fit any healthy
 lifestyle while adding pleasure to our lives."
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X15781815
 
 SOURCE  National Confectioners Association