Alaska's Whittier Access Project Named 2001 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement

Houston's Enron Field Receives Merit Award for Outstanding Civil

Engineering Achievement



Apr 28, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Society of Civil Engineers

    WASHINGTON, April 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Alaska's Whittier Access Project
 (WAP) was today named 2001 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement by the
 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).  Past OCEA winners include the
 Relocation of the Cape Hatteras Light Station, the Interstate Highway H-3 in
 Hawaii, the Denver International Airport and the World Trade Center.
     The WAP provides highway access for the residents of City of Whittier,
 Alaska -- a vital cargo port, recreational area and tourist destination
 located on Prince William Sound to the rest of the world.  For 50 years prior
 to the completion of the project, Whittier was separated from the nearest
 highway by five miles of rugged mountains, lakes, and glaciers, forcing
 residents who needed to travel outside of Whittier to load their automobiles
 onto shuttle trains that would travel through a 2.5-mile-long railroad tunnel.
     Presented to the owner of the project, the Alaska Department of
 Transportation and Public Facilities at the Outstanding Projects and Leaders
 (OPAL) gala celebration in Washington, DC, the award recognizes the project
 for its contribution to the well being of people and communities.  WAP was
 selected from among 17 other outstanding projects throughout the United
 States.
     "The Whittier Access Project not only serves as a symbol of engineering
 ingenuity, but also represents a significant contribution to Alaskan
 communities, providing Whittier community with improved access to retail
 services, social and cultural activities, and recreational facilities," said
 Robert W. Bein, P.E., F.ASCE.  "Today, we commend all of those involved --
 from the Alaska Department of Transportation to the Kiewit Construction
 Company -- for the superb job they did in working together to successfully and
 efficiently complete this challenging work."
     WAP met the community's need for easier access and enabled the community
 to comply with new Federal Railroad Administration safety regulations.  The
 $80 million project converted the 2.5-mile railroad tunnel into a multi-modal
 railroad and highway facility, the only combined highway/railroad tunnel in
 the world.  It is also the longest highway tunnel in North America.  The
 project also includes two bridges, a 500-foot-long highway tunnel, 2.6 miles
 of road, and support facilities.
     One other project, Enron Field in Houston, TX, the new home of the Houston
 Astros, received a merit award.  The $250 million project was created to
 enhance the fan experience and features an innovative retractable roof,
 natural grass playing field and wide-open design.  Serving as a cornerstone of
 renewal for the historic northeast quadrant of the city, Enron was built on
 the site of a 1911 railroad station, which was renovated and incorporated in
 the design of the stadium.  A full-scale working locomotive helps reinforce
 the important historical reference to Houston's history as a railroad hub.
     Each year since 1960, ASCE names a project as an Outstanding Civil
 Engineering Achievement.  The prestigious national award recognizes civil
 engineering projects that contribute to community well-being, demonstrate
 resourcefulness in planning and solving design challenges, and use innovative
 construction methods.
     The OPAL awards honor professional civil engineers for lifelong
 contributions in five categories -- public works, construction, management,
 design and education.  The first OPAL awards were inaugurated in April 2000.
     Founded in 1852, ASCE represents more than 123,000 civil engineers
 worldwide and is America's oldest national engineering society.
 
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SOURCE American Society of Civil Engineers
    WASHINGTON, April 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Alaska's Whittier Access Project
 (WAP) was today named 2001 Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement by the
 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).  Past OCEA winners include the
 Relocation of the Cape Hatteras Light Station, the Interstate Highway H-3 in
 Hawaii, the Denver International Airport and the World Trade Center.
     The WAP provides highway access for the residents of City of Whittier,
 Alaska -- a vital cargo port, recreational area and tourist destination
 located on Prince William Sound to the rest of the world.  For 50 years prior
 to the completion of the project, Whittier was separated from the nearest
 highway by five miles of rugged mountains, lakes, and glaciers, forcing
 residents who needed to travel outside of Whittier to load their automobiles
 onto shuttle trains that would travel through a 2.5-mile-long railroad tunnel.
     Presented to the owner of the project, the Alaska Department of
 Transportation and Public Facilities at the Outstanding Projects and Leaders
 (OPAL) gala celebration in Washington, DC, the award recognizes the project
 for its contribution to the well being of people and communities.  WAP was
 selected from among 17 other outstanding projects throughout the United
 States.
     "The Whittier Access Project not only serves as a symbol of engineering
 ingenuity, but also represents a significant contribution to Alaskan
 communities, providing Whittier community with improved access to retail
 services, social and cultural activities, and recreational facilities," said
 Robert W. Bein, P.E., F.ASCE.  "Today, we commend all of those involved --
 from the Alaska Department of Transportation to the Kiewit Construction
 Company -- for the superb job they did in working together to successfully and
 efficiently complete this challenging work."
     WAP met the community's need for easier access and enabled the community
 to comply with new Federal Railroad Administration safety regulations.  The
 $80 million project converted the 2.5-mile railroad tunnel into a multi-modal
 railroad and highway facility, the only combined highway/railroad tunnel in
 the world.  It is also the longest highway tunnel in North America.  The
 project also includes two bridges, a 500-foot-long highway tunnel, 2.6 miles
 of road, and support facilities.
     One other project, Enron Field in Houston, TX, the new home of the Houston
 Astros, received a merit award.  The $250 million project was created to
 enhance the fan experience and features an innovative retractable roof,
 natural grass playing field and wide-open design.  Serving as a cornerstone of
 renewal for the historic northeast quadrant of the city, Enron was built on
 the site of a 1911 railroad station, which was renovated and incorporated in
 the design of the stadium.  A full-scale working locomotive helps reinforce
 the important historical reference to Houston's history as a railroad hub.
     Each year since 1960, ASCE names a project as an Outstanding Civil
 Engineering Achievement.  The prestigious national award recognizes civil
 engineering projects that contribute to community well-being, demonstrate
 resourcefulness in planning and solving design challenges, and use innovative
 construction methods.
     The OPAL awards honor professional civil engineers for lifelong
 contributions in five categories -- public works, construction, management,
 design and education.  The first OPAL awards were inaugurated in April 2000.
     Founded in 1852, ASCE represents more than 123,000 civil engineers
 worldwide and is America's oldest national engineering society.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X62804929
 
 SOURCE  American Society of Civil Engineers