Alliance of Early Childhood Professionals: 'When Child Care Professionals Leave, Children Grieve. Breaking Up is Hard to do.'

Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from Alliance of Early Childhood Professionals

    MINNEAPOLIS, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Early childhood providers will be
 coming to the state capitol on Friday April 6, 2001, to let policy makers know
 they support two bills that will help reduce high turnover in early childhood
 programs and increase the quality of child care.
 
           "Where our future begins" ... The Week of the Young Child
            Governor Jesse Ventura has declared April 1-7, 2001, as
                            Week of the Young Child!
 
     On Friday April 6, 2001 The Alliance of Early Childhood Professionals,
 along with the Minnesota Child Care Resource & Referral Network, The Minnesota
 Association for the Education of Young Children and The Minnesota Licensed
 Family Child Care Association, is holding a rally a the state capitol for the
 Early Care and Education Work Force!
 
     Where:  St. Paul Capitol Rotunda
     When:   10:00 -11:00 a.m. on Friday April 6, 2001
 
     The event will begin with speakers and end with a treasure hunt around the
 state capitol for the children.
     The legislature is considering two bills, T.E.A.C.H. and School Readiness.
     T.E.A.C.H., which stands for Teacher Education Compensation Helps, is a
 scholarship program that will improve the quality of early care and education
 in Minnesota by increasing the education of people working with young
 children, reducing staff turnover, and recruiting people to the early care and
 education field.  Scholarships are awarded up to $2,000/year in tuition
 assistance for courses leading to the nationally recognized Child Development
 Associate Credential or college level course work in child development or
 similar credentials recognized by the Department of Children, Families and
 Learning, or an A.A., B.A. or M.A. in the field of early childhood
 development.  Additionally, participants in the T.E.A.C.H. scholarship program
 will be eligible to receive an education incentive bonus if they complete a
 year of commitment working in the field.  Furthermore, early care and
 education providers, who have been working with children for more than one
 year, at the same place of employment, will be eligible to receive retention
 stipends.  This bill, if passed could be the first step to ensuring that
 children, families, and people working with them are receiving what they each
 deserve.  Sixteen states now have a T.E.A.C.H. program that is making a
 significant impact on turnover and quality.
     The School Readiness Bill will provide funds to child care programs along
 with existing school readiness programs to provide high quality child care and
 enrichment programs.  With 20-30 percent of Minnesota's children entering
 kindergarten without the skills needed to be successful, this program has the
 potential to increase standards for outcome and performance.
     A plethora of studies are documenting the high turnover and low wages in
 the early childhood field and its impact on quality of care to Minnesota's
 children.  At the same time, studies are showing that, "the better care young
 children receive, the better they do later in school and in life."
     "Measuring Up," a study that was just released by the University of
 Minnesota and Resources for Child Caring, takes a close look at the quality of
 child care in four counties in Minnesota.  This study, along with several
 other studies has all pointed to the same conclusion-high quality child care
 helps prepare children for kindergarten.
     As stated above, the quality of a child's early childhood care and
 educational experience plays a critical role in supporting a child's
 development and later learning.  National studies have rated the average child
 care experience as mediocre and as less than acceptable for infants and
 toddlers.  Low wages, high turnover, and training of the early care and
 education work force greatly impact this mediocre assessment.  "The Early
 Childhood & School-Age Staff Recruitment and Retention Study," which was
 recently released by the Department of Children, Families, and Learning, takes
 a close look at child care center staff hourly wages.  The average teacher,
 statewide, makes between a wage of $9.39/hour and $11.51/hour.  The average
 teacher in the metro area makes between an average wage of $9.95/hour and
 $12.23/hour.  Looking at these wages, it is no wonder that the early care and
 education field is in a state of crisis with quality staff and stability in
 the field.
 
  The bottom line ... we need to do better for our children ... this is where
                               our future begins!
 
 

SOURCE Alliance of Early Childhood Professionals
    MINNEAPOLIS, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Early childhood providers will be
 coming to the state capitol on Friday April 6, 2001, to let policy makers know
 they support two bills that will help reduce high turnover in early childhood
 programs and increase the quality of child care.
 
           "Where our future begins" ... The Week of the Young Child
            Governor Jesse Ventura has declared April 1-7, 2001, as
                            Week of the Young Child!
 
     On Friday April 6, 2001 The Alliance of Early Childhood Professionals,
 along with the Minnesota Child Care Resource & Referral Network, The Minnesota
 Association for the Education of Young Children and The Minnesota Licensed
 Family Child Care Association, is holding a rally a the state capitol for the
 Early Care and Education Work Force!
 
     Where:  St. Paul Capitol Rotunda
     When:   10:00 -11:00 a.m. on Friday April 6, 2001
 
     The event will begin with speakers and end with a treasure hunt around the
 state capitol for the children.
     The legislature is considering two bills, T.E.A.C.H. and School Readiness.
     T.E.A.C.H., which stands for Teacher Education Compensation Helps, is a
 scholarship program that will improve the quality of early care and education
 in Minnesota by increasing the education of people working with young
 children, reducing staff turnover, and recruiting people to the early care and
 education field.  Scholarships are awarded up to $2,000/year in tuition
 assistance for courses leading to the nationally recognized Child Development
 Associate Credential or college level course work in child development or
 similar credentials recognized by the Department of Children, Families and
 Learning, or an A.A., B.A. or M.A. in the field of early childhood
 development.  Additionally, participants in the T.E.A.C.H. scholarship program
 will be eligible to receive an education incentive bonus if they complete a
 year of commitment working in the field.  Furthermore, early care and
 education providers, who have been working with children for more than one
 year, at the same place of employment, will be eligible to receive retention
 stipends.  This bill, if passed could be the first step to ensuring that
 children, families, and people working with them are receiving what they each
 deserve.  Sixteen states now have a T.E.A.C.H. program that is making a
 significant impact on turnover and quality.
     The School Readiness Bill will provide funds to child care programs along
 with existing school readiness programs to provide high quality child care and
 enrichment programs.  With 20-30 percent of Minnesota's children entering
 kindergarten without the skills needed to be successful, this program has the
 potential to increase standards for outcome and performance.
     A plethora of studies are documenting the high turnover and low wages in
 the early childhood field and its impact on quality of care to Minnesota's
 children.  At the same time, studies are showing that, "the better care young
 children receive, the better they do later in school and in life."
     "Measuring Up," a study that was just released by the University of
 Minnesota and Resources for Child Caring, takes a close look at the quality of
 child care in four counties in Minnesota.  This study, along with several
 other studies has all pointed to the same conclusion-high quality child care
 helps prepare children for kindergarten.
     As stated above, the quality of a child's early childhood care and
 educational experience plays a critical role in supporting a child's
 development and later learning.  National studies have rated the average child
 care experience as mediocre and as less than acceptable for infants and
 toddlers.  Low wages, high turnover, and training of the early care and
 education work force greatly impact this mediocre assessment.  "The Early
 Childhood & School-Age Staff Recruitment and Retention Study," which was
 recently released by the Department of Children, Families, and Learning, takes
 a close look at child care center staff hourly wages.  The average teacher,
 statewide, makes between a wage of $9.39/hour and $11.51/hour.  The average
 teacher in the metro area makes between an average wage of $9.95/hour and
 $12.23/hour.  Looking at these wages, it is no wonder that the early care and
 education field is in a state of crisis with quality staff and stability in
 the field.
 
  The bottom line ... we need to do better for our children ... this is where
                               our future begins!
 
 SOURCE  Alliance of Early Childhood Professionals