American Academy of Dermatology: New Research: Making the Most of Your Sunscreen

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Academy of Dermatology

    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Many sports enthusiasts spend days
 preparing for their weekend getaways.  New equipment is purchased, knapsacks
 are packed and first aid travel kits are restocked with bandages and
 cortisone.  Sunscreen, one of the most important items to include in a first
 aid kit, does more than prevent sunburns; using it saves lives.
     Speaking today at the American Academy of Dermatology's Melanoma/Skin
 Cancer Detection and Prevention Month Press Conference, dermatologist Darrell
 S. Rigel, MD, Clinical Professor, New York University Medical Center, New
 York, presented new research indicating that the reapplication of sunscreen is
 the most important factor in determining its effectiveness.
     "Most people know that the sun's rays are dangerous, but that does not
 always translate into recognizable protective actions," stated Dr. Rigel.
 "Consumers need to take the warning about the dangers of the sun seriously and
 use sunscreen as a part of an effective sun protection program."
     Dr. Rigel's study followed 105 skiers in Vail, Colorado over a one-week
 period in January.  Each participant was given an unmarked bottle of sunscreen
 (either SPF 15 or 30) and instructed to maintain a log of the amount of time
 they spent outdoors as well as the amount of sunscreen applied.
     The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence how
 effective sunscreens were in protecting from sunburn in an intense ultraviolet
 environment.  After analyzing factors associated with burning, the study
 concluded sunscreen, when used correctly, was an effective defense from
 sunburn when in an open aired, highly elevated, sun exposed and sun reflective
 environment.  The data further revealed that of those who re-applied sunscreen
 every 2.5 hours or more frequently were five times more likely to sunburn
 compared to those who applied sunscreen every two hours or more.
     According to Dr. Rigel's study, the reflection of the sun can add up to
 40 percent additional ultraviolet intensity to that exposure.  Further,
 ultraviolet intensities at altitudes of 8,000 to 11,000 feet have been shown
 to be 60 percent to 80 percent higher than at sea level for the same latitude.
     Dr. Rigel also examined the effect of altitude and a reflective
 environment on UV exposure.  "A skier on an average day receives more than
 three times the UV exposure necessary for sunburn," said Dr. Rigel.  "These
 results confirm the need for regular UV protection to minimize subsequent
 lifetime melanoma risk."
     Previous studies have confirmed that sun exposure is responsible for the
 development of at least two-thirds of all melanomas, the deadliest form of
 skin cancer.  Intermittent sun exposure, which is often recreational and
 frequently occurs daily for prolonged periods of time, is also closely linked
 to melanoma.
     "The use of sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher with frequent
 re-applications appears to be one of the most effective and effortless methods
 of sunburn protection," said Dr. Rigel.  "Although this study surveyed those
 who enjoyed winter sports, the findings should be applied to all those who
 enjoy the great outdoors."
     The study reinforced the AAD's recommendations for effective sunscreen
 use:
 
     -- Wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of
        at least 15.
     -- Use sunscreens every day if you are going to be in the sun for more
        than 20 minutes.
     -- Apply sunscreens to dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before going outdoors.
     -- When applying sunscreen, pay particular attention to the face, ears,
        hands and arms, and generously coat the skin that is not covered by
        clothing.
     -- One ounce of sunscreen, enough to fill a shot glass, is considered the
        amount needed to cover the exposed areas of the body completely.
     -- Reapply sunscreens every two hours or immediately after swimming or
        strenuous activity.
 
     In addition to wearing a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or
 higher, a comprehensive sun protection program includes avoiding deliberate
 tanning with indoor or outdoor light, seeking shade, wearing protective
 clothing, and limiting exposure during peak hours.
     Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with
 more than 1 million new cases diagnosed every year.  It is estimated that
 51,400 people in the United States will be diagnosed with melanoma, in 2001, a
 9 percent increase from 2000.  In addition, approximately 7,800 deaths will be
 attributed to melanoma in 2001.
     The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most
 influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations.  With a
 membership of over 13,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is committed
 to: advancing the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the skin;
 advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in
 dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care; and promoting a lifetime
 of healthier skin, hair and nails.  For more information, contact the AAD at
 1-888-462-DERM or www.aad.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X33371151
 
 

SOURCE American Academy of Dermatology
    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Many sports enthusiasts spend days
 preparing for their weekend getaways.  New equipment is purchased, knapsacks
 are packed and first aid travel kits are restocked with bandages and
 cortisone.  Sunscreen, one of the most important items to include in a first
 aid kit, does more than prevent sunburns; using it saves lives.
     Speaking today at the American Academy of Dermatology's Melanoma/Skin
 Cancer Detection and Prevention Month Press Conference, dermatologist Darrell
 S. Rigel, MD, Clinical Professor, New York University Medical Center, New
 York, presented new research indicating that the reapplication of sunscreen is
 the most important factor in determining its effectiveness.
     "Most people know that the sun's rays are dangerous, but that does not
 always translate into recognizable protective actions," stated Dr. Rigel.
 "Consumers need to take the warning about the dangers of the sun seriously and
 use sunscreen as a part of an effective sun protection program."
     Dr. Rigel's study followed 105 skiers in Vail, Colorado over a one-week
 period in January.  Each participant was given an unmarked bottle of sunscreen
 (either SPF 15 or 30) and instructed to maintain a log of the amount of time
 they spent outdoors as well as the amount of sunscreen applied.
     The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence how
 effective sunscreens were in protecting from sunburn in an intense ultraviolet
 environment.  After analyzing factors associated with burning, the study
 concluded sunscreen, when used correctly, was an effective defense from
 sunburn when in an open aired, highly elevated, sun exposed and sun reflective
 environment.  The data further revealed that of those who re-applied sunscreen
 every 2.5 hours or more frequently were five times more likely to sunburn
 compared to those who applied sunscreen every two hours or more.
     According to Dr. Rigel's study, the reflection of the sun can add up to
 40 percent additional ultraviolet intensity to that exposure.  Further,
 ultraviolet intensities at altitudes of 8,000 to 11,000 feet have been shown
 to be 60 percent to 80 percent higher than at sea level for the same latitude.
     Dr. Rigel also examined the effect of altitude and a reflective
 environment on UV exposure.  "A skier on an average day receives more than
 three times the UV exposure necessary for sunburn," said Dr. Rigel.  "These
 results confirm the need for regular UV protection to minimize subsequent
 lifetime melanoma risk."
     Previous studies have confirmed that sun exposure is responsible for the
 development of at least two-thirds of all melanomas, the deadliest form of
 skin cancer.  Intermittent sun exposure, which is often recreational and
 frequently occurs daily for prolonged periods of time, is also closely linked
 to melanoma.
     "The use of sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher with frequent
 re-applications appears to be one of the most effective and effortless methods
 of sunburn protection," said Dr. Rigel.  "Although this study surveyed those
 who enjoyed winter sports, the findings should be applied to all those who
 enjoy the great outdoors."
     The study reinforced the AAD's recommendations for effective sunscreen
 use:
 
     -- Wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of
        at least 15.
     -- Use sunscreens every day if you are going to be in the sun for more
        than 20 minutes.
     -- Apply sunscreens to dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before going outdoors.
     -- When applying sunscreen, pay particular attention to the face, ears,
        hands and arms, and generously coat the skin that is not covered by
        clothing.
     -- One ounce of sunscreen, enough to fill a shot glass, is considered the
        amount needed to cover the exposed areas of the body completely.
     -- Reapply sunscreens every two hours or immediately after swimming or
        strenuous activity.
 
     In addition to wearing a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or
 higher, a comprehensive sun protection program includes avoiding deliberate
 tanning with indoor or outdoor light, seeking shade, wearing protective
 clothing, and limiting exposure during peak hours.
     Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with
 more than 1 million new cases diagnosed every year.  It is estimated that
 51,400 people in the United States will be diagnosed with melanoma, in 2001, a
 9 percent increase from 2000.  In addition, approximately 7,800 deaths will be
 attributed to melanoma in 2001.
     The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most
 influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations.  With a
 membership of over 13,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is committed
 to: advancing the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the skin;
 advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in
 dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care; and promoting a lifetime
 of healthier skin, hair and nails.  For more information, contact the AAD at
 1-888-462-DERM or www.aad.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X33371151
 
 SOURCE  American Academy of Dermatology