American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine Executive, Walter J. McDonald, MD, to Step Down in 2002

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine

    PHILADELPHIA, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Walter J. McDonald, MD, FACP, has
 announced that he will step down as Executive Vice President (EVP) and Chief
 Executive Officer (CEO) of the American College of Physicians-American Society
 of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM) in July 2002.  McDonald became EVP of the
 American College of Physicians in June 1995 and EVP and CEO of the ACP-ASIM
 after the two organizations merged in 1998.
     "I have always believed that change is important and that is what keeps an
 organization vibrant and growing," says McDonald.  "I came to the College in
 1995 planning to stay about seven years."  He says he has no definite plans
 for the next stage in his career, but is announcing his departure now "to
 provide adequate time for the College to find a successor."
     McDonald announced his departure at a meeting of the ACP-ASIM Board of
 Regents April 1.  The Board appointed its Chair, Bernard M. Rosof, MD, FACP,
 to form a search committee to find a replacement for McDonald.
     "The last six years have been good years for the College and good years
 for me," says McDonald.  "I am confident that the Board of Regents' search
 committee will find an outstanding internist to lead this organization into
 the future."
     McDonald was instrumental in shepherding negotiations for the merger of
 the two largest professional organizations of internal medicine in the United
 States.  The 80,000-member American College of Physicians, founded in 1915 and
 headquartered in Philadelphia, was the acknowledged leader in education,
 scientific policy and ethics for internists, or doctors of internal medicine.
 The American Society of Internal Medicine, headquartered in Washington and
 with a smaller membership, was the leader in public policy and practice
 management issues pertinent to internists.  The organizations merged in July
 1998, forming ACP-ASIM, the largest medical specialty organization in the
 United States and second largest medical organization in the United States,
 with 115,000 members.
     Over the past six years, McDonald also helped the organization develop a
 large program for medical students and create a national public awareness
 campaign to explain internal medicine and internists to the general public.
     McDonald, a graduate of Williams College, in Williamstown, Mass., and the
 University of Michigan Medical School, was a professor of medicine at the
 Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, Oregon, before joining the
 American College of Physicians.  At OHSU, he was also associate dean for
 education and student affairs and director of the graduate medical education
 program.  He served in the U.S. Army from 1965 to 1967.  He is certified by
 the American Board of Internal Medicine in medicine and endocrinology.
     ACP-ASIM is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to enhance the
 quality and effectiveness of health care by fostering excellence and
 professionalism in the practice of medicine.  ACP-ASIM publishes Annals of
 Internal Medicine, one of the top three peer-reviewed medical journals in the
 United States and the leading journal for physicians practicing internal
 medicine and its subspecialties.
 
 

SOURCE American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine
    PHILADELPHIA, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Walter J. McDonald, MD, FACP, has
 announced that he will step down as Executive Vice President (EVP) and Chief
 Executive Officer (CEO) of the American College of Physicians-American Society
 of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM) in July 2002.  McDonald became EVP of the
 American College of Physicians in June 1995 and EVP and CEO of the ACP-ASIM
 after the two organizations merged in 1998.
     "I have always believed that change is important and that is what keeps an
 organization vibrant and growing," says McDonald.  "I came to the College in
 1995 planning to stay about seven years."  He says he has no definite plans
 for the next stage in his career, but is announcing his departure now "to
 provide adequate time for the College to find a successor."
     McDonald announced his departure at a meeting of the ACP-ASIM Board of
 Regents April 1.  The Board appointed its Chair, Bernard M. Rosof, MD, FACP,
 to form a search committee to find a replacement for McDonald.
     "The last six years have been good years for the College and good years
 for me," says McDonald.  "I am confident that the Board of Regents' search
 committee will find an outstanding internist to lead this organization into
 the future."
     McDonald was instrumental in shepherding negotiations for the merger of
 the two largest professional organizations of internal medicine in the United
 States.  The 80,000-member American College of Physicians, founded in 1915 and
 headquartered in Philadelphia, was the acknowledged leader in education,
 scientific policy and ethics for internists, or doctors of internal medicine.
 The American Society of Internal Medicine, headquartered in Washington and
 with a smaller membership, was the leader in public policy and practice
 management issues pertinent to internists.  The organizations merged in July
 1998, forming ACP-ASIM, the largest medical specialty organization in the
 United States and second largest medical organization in the United States,
 with 115,000 members.
     Over the past six years, McDonald also helped the organization develop a
 large program for medical students and create a national public awareness
 campaign to explain internal medicine and internists to the general public.
     McDonald, a graduate of Williams College, in Williamstown, Mass., and the
 University of Michigan Medical School, was a professor of medicine at the
 Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, Oregon, before joining the
 American College of Physicians.  At OHSU, he was also associate dean for
 education and student affairs and director of the graduate medical education
 program.  He served in the U.S. Army from 1965 to 1967.  He is certified by
 the American Board of Internal Medicine in medicine and endocrinology.
     ACP-ASIM is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to enhance the
 quality and effectiveness of health care by fostering excellence and
 professionalism in the practice of medicine.  ACP-ASIM publishes Annals of
 Internal Medicine, one of the top three peer-reviewed medical journals in the
 United States and the leading journal for physicians practicing internal
 medicine and its subspecialties.
 
 SOURCE  American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine