American Heart Association Comment: 'Comparison of Coronary-Artery Bypass Surgery and Stenting For the Treatment of Multivessel Disease'

Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Heart Association

              New England Journal of Medicine  (April 12, 2001)
 
     A study in the New England Journal of Medicine compares stenting to
 coronary artery bypass surgery for treating individuals with heart disease who
 have multiple coronary arteries blocked.
     The study found that stenting and surgery are about equal in protection
 against stroke, heart attack and death at one-year follow-up.  Stenting costs
 less -- an estimated $3,000 savings per patient.  However, bypass surgery was
 associated with less angina and fewer subsequent revascularizations.
     According to Sidney Smith, M.D., Chief Science Officer at the American
 Heart Association, "This study shows that patients with advanced coronary
 artery disease have options for revascularization.  Because stenting is less
 costly, and less invasive, it may be a more appealing option for some
 individuals.
     "For the aging population it would appear that stenting may have
 advantages over bypass surgery.  There are certain risks associated with
 bypass surgery, such as having to undergo general anesthesia, which may be of
 particular concern for elderly individuals.
     "However, because repeat procedures are required more often in stenting,
 surgery may be the better course for other individuals," Smith says.
     "It will be important to follow the potential benefits of new therapies,
 such as the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors combined with stent
 placement, to determine if the results of stenting procedures can be
 improved," he adds.
 
     Contact: Carole Bullock, 214-706-1279, or Bridgette McNeill, 214-706-1135,
              both News Media Relations of American Heart Association.
 
 

SOURCE American Heart Association
              New England Journal of Medicine  (April 12, 2001)
 
     A study in the New England Journal of Medicine compares stenting to
 coronary artery bypass surgery for treating individuals with heart disease who
 have multiple coronary arteries blocked.
     The study found that stenting and surgery are about equal in protection
 against stroke, heart attack and death at one-year follow-up.  Stenting costs
 less -- an estimated $3,000 savings per patient.  However, bypass surgery was
 associated with less angina and fewer subsequent revascularizations.
     According to Sidney Smith, M.D., Chief Science Officer at the American
 Heart Association, "This study shows that patients with advanced coronary
 artery disease have options for revascularization.  Because stenting is less
 costly, and less invasive, it may be a more appealing option for some
 individuals.
     "For the aging population it would appear that stenting may have
 advantages over bypass surgery.  There are certain risks associated with
 bypass surgery, such as having to undergo general anesthesia, which may be of
 particular concern for elderly individuals.
     "However, because repeat procedures are required more often in stenting,
 surgery may be the better course for other individuals," Smith says.
     "It will be important to follow the potential benefits of new therapies,
 such as the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors combined with stent
 placement, to determine if the results of stenting procedures can be
 improved," he adds.
 
     Contact: Carole Bullock, 214-706-1279, or Bridgette McNeill, 214-706-1135,
              both News Media Relations of American Heart Association.
 
 SOURCE  American Heart Association