American Podiatric Medical Association Survey Suggests Heel Pain Epidemic

Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Podiatric Medical Association

    BETHESDA, Md., April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- A poll conducted in March, by the
 American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) at its Web site
 http://www.apma.org found that 30 percent of the respondents reported to have
 suffered from heel pain over the past 90 days.  Heel pain out distanced toe
 pain (13 percent), bunion pain (12 percent), and corn/callus (11 percent).
     "This finding substantiates the fact that there is an epidemic of heel
 pain in this country," said Ronald Jensen, DPM, Public Education and
 Information Committee Chair.  "Heel pain is one of the most common afflictions
 podiatrists see in patients."
     The survey was posted at the APMA Web site March 2 and asked visitors to
 the site the following question: "Within the last 90 days which of the
 following foot health issues has troubled you the most?"  Choices ranged from
 heel pain, corns and callus, to athlete's foot, toe pain, and bunion pain.
 "Other" was also presented as a choice.  As of April 9 nearly 1,800 people
 participated in the poll.
     Dr. Jensen believes the reason podiatrists see so many patients with heel
 pain is because Americans are more active and are taking more preventative
 measures to ensure they are able to stay active.
     Heel pain is generally the result of too much stress on the heel bone and
 the soft tissues that attach to it.  The stress may result from injury,
 walking or running (even standing) on hard surfaces for long periods of time,
 wearing poorly constructed shoes, or being overweight.  A sharp, knife-like
 pain in the heel characterizes heel pain when a person first stands.  The pain
 is often at its worst when first getting out of bed in the morning.
     To avoid heel pain, the APMA recommends the following tips:
 
     *  If you have not exercised in a long time, consult your podiatric
        physician before starting a new exercise program.
     *  Begin an exercise program slowly, don=t go too far or too fast.
     *  Purchase and maintain good shoes and replace them regularly.
     *  Stretch each foot and achilles tendon before and after exercise.
     *  Avoid uneven walking surfaces or stepping on rocks as much as possible.
     *  Avoid going barefoot on hard surfaces.
     *  Vary the incline on a treadmill during exercise.  Nobody walks uphill
        all the time.
     *  If it hurts, stop.  Don't try to work through the pain.
 
     For the final survey results and more information on heel pain and general
 foot health, visit the APMA Web site at www.apma.org  or call 1-800-FOOTCARE
 to request a free brochure.
 
 

SOURCE American Podiatric Medical Association
    BETHESDA, Md., April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- A poll conducted in March, by the
 American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) at its Web site
 http://www.apma.org found that 30 percent of the respondents reported to have
 suffered from heel pain over the past 90 days.  Heel pain out distanced toe
 pain (13 percent), bunion pain (12 percent), and corn/callus (11 percent).
     "This finding substantiates the fact that there is an epidemic of heel
 pain in this country," said Ronald Jensen, DPM, Public Education and
 Information Committee Chair.  "Heel pain is one of the most common afflictions
 podiatrists see in patients."
     The survey was posted at the APMA Web site March 2 and asked visitors to
 the site the following question: "Within the last 90 days which of the
 following foot health issues has troubled you the most?"  Choices ranged from
 heel pain, corns and callus, to athlete's foot, toe pain, and bunion pain.
 "Other" was also presented as a choice.  As of April 9 nearly 1,800 people
 participated in the poll.
     Dr. Jensen believes the reason podiatrists see so many patients with heel
 pain is because Americans are more active and are taking more preventative
 measures to ensure they are able to stay active.
     Heel pain is generally the result of too much stress on the heel bone and
 the soft tissues that attach to it.  The stress may result from injury,
 walking or running (even standing) on hard surfaces for long periods of time,
 wearing poorly constructed shoes, or being overweight.  A sharp, knife-like
 pain in the heel characterizes heel pain when a person first stands.  The pain
 is often at its worst when first getting out of bed in the morning.
     To avoid heel pain, the APMA recommends the following tips:
 
     *  If you have not exercised in a long time, consult your podiatric
        physician before starting a new exercise program.
     *  Begin an exercise program slowly, don=t go too far or too fast.
     *  Purchase and maintain good shoes and replace them regularly.
     *  Stretch each foot and achilles tendon before and after exercise.
     *  Avoid uneven walking surfaces or stepping on rocks as much as possible.
     *  Avoid going barefoot on hard surfaces.
     *  Vary the incline on a treadmill during exercise.  Nobody walks uphill
        all the time.
     *  If it hurts, stop.  Don't try to work through the pain.
 
     For the final survey results and more information on heel pain and general
 foot health, visit the APMA Web site at www.apma.org  or call 1-800-FOOTCARE
 to request a free brochure.
 
 SOURCE  American Podiatric Medical Association