amfAR Symposium Advances Scholarly Exchange on the Impact of the Biotechnology Revolution

Nobel Laureate Dr. David Baltimore and Distinguished Panelists Debate Science,

Policy and Business Issues



Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Foundation for AIDS Research

    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- A
 distinguished group of panelists participated today in a symposium organized
 by the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) at the New York Academy
 of Sciences to discuss and debate the challenges and opportunities presented
 by biomedical science in light of recent progress including the mapping of the
 human genome.  The symposium, entitled "The Biotechnology Revolution in the
 New Millennium: Science, Policy and Business," was aimed at increasing
 awareness and understanding of the impact biomedical research has had, and
 will continue to have, on all aspects of society.
     "The importance of biotechnology is immeasurable, particularly when we
 consider the many unconquered diseases that continue to threaten public
 health," stated Dr. David Baltimore, Nobel laureate, President of the
 California Institute of Technology and the Symposium Chair.  "This is an
 important time to define how we can best utilize the economic and human
 resources that are needed to move forward with biotech discovery as well as
 re-evaluate the roles of -- government, academia and private enterprise -- in
 biotech investigation."
     With more than 100 biotech drugs and applications on the market, plus an
 additional 369 in clinical trials, biotechnology holds tremendous promise for
 the discovery of the mechanisms and etiology underlying many of today's most
 devastating diseases including AIDS, cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's,
 multiple sclerosis, diabetes and many others.  "Given their complexity, the
 diseases that affect the immune system, such as AIDS, are likely to benefit
 most from advances in biotechnology.  It will allow scientists to identify,
 isolate and study, at the molecular level, the structure, function and
 interactions of the many components of cells, so as to come to understand
 disease mechanisms and identify targets for drug and vaccine discovery,"
 explains Dr. Mathilde Krim, amfAR's Founding Chair and Chairman of the Board.
     "As we witness and experience the remarkable scientific discoveries made
 possible by advances in biotechnology, we must continually remind ourselves
 that the process of applying the gifts of science to the benefit of people is
 increasingly protracted and complex," explains Jerome Radwin, amfAR's Chief
 Executive Officer.  "As a stakeholder in the biomedical field, our
 organization strongly believes that it is important to take a broad look and
 to provide a forum for ongoing dialogue among all who are deeply vested in the
 future of biotechnology."
     Some of the issues addressed at the amfAR symposium included: how platform
 technologies are shaping the field, academia-industry partnerships, the shifts
 in policy and scientific communications as well as institutional models for
 the development of biotech drugs, vaccines and diagnostics.  The symposium was
 targeted to a diverse audience representing academia, private enterprise,
 communications, venture philanthropy, and financial analysts.
     In addition to Dr. Baltimore, other panelists included Dr. Leroy Hood,
 President and Director of the Institute for Systems Biology; Dr. Donald
 Kennedy, Editor-in-Chief of Science and President Emeritus, Stanford
 University; and Dr. Charles Sanders, Retired Chairman and CEO of Glaxo, Inc.
     The American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) is the nation's leading
 non-profit organization dedicated to the support of AIDS research, AIDS
 prevention, treatment education, and the advocacy of sound AIDS-related public
 policy.  Since 1985, amfAR has invested nearly $175 million in support for its
 programs and awarded grants to more than 1,850 research teams worldwide.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X76177719
 
 

SOURCE American Foundation for AIDS Research
    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- A
 distinguished group of panelists participated today in a symposium organized
 by the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) at the New York Academy
 of Sciences to discuss and debate the challenges and opportunities presented
 by biomedical science in light of recent progress including the mapping of the
 human genome.  The symposium, entitled "The Biotechnology Revolution in the
 New Millennium: Science, Policy and Business," was aimed at increasing
 awareness and understanding of the impact biomedical research has had, and
 will continue to have, on all aspects of society.
     "The importance of biotechnology is immeasurable, particularly when we
 consider the many unconquered diseases that continue to threaten public
 health," stated Dr. David Baltimore, Nobel laureate, President of the
 California Institute of Technology and the Symposium Chair.  "This is an
 important time to define how we can best utilize the economic and human
 resources that are needed to move forward with biotech discovery as well as
 re-evaluate the roles of -- government, academia and private enterprise -- in
 biotech investigation."
     With more than 100 biotech drugs and applications on the market, plus an
 additional 369 in clinical trials, biotechnology holds tremendous promise for
 the discovery of the mechanisms and etiology underlying many of today's most
 devastating diseases including AIDS, cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's,
 multiple sclerosis, diabetes and many others.  "Given their complexity, the
 diseases that affect the immune system, such as AIDS, are likely to benefit
 most from advances in biotechnology.  It will allow scientists to identify,
 isolate and study, at the molecular level, the structure, function and
 interactions of the many components of cells, so as to come to understand
 disease mechanisms and identify targets for drug and vaccine discovery,"
 explains Dr. Mathilde Krim, amfAR's Founding Chair and Chairman of the Board.
     "As we witness and experience the remarkable scientific discoveries made
 possible by advances in biotechnology, we must continually remind ourselves
 that the process of applying the gifts of science to the benefit of people is
 increasingly protracted and complex," explains Jerome Radwin, amfAR's Chief
 Executive Officer.  "As a stakeholder in the biomedical field, our
 organization strongly believes that it is important to take a broad look and
 to provide a forum for ongoing dialogue among all who are deeply vested in the
 future of biotechnology."
     Some of the issues addressed at the amfAR symposium included: how platform
 technologies are shaping the field, academia-industry partnerships, the shifts
 in policy and scientific communications as well as institutional models for
 the development of biotech drugs, vaccines and diagnostics.  The symposium was
 targeted to a diverse audience representing academia, private enterprise,
 communications, venture philanthropy, and financial analysts.
     In addition to Dr. Baltimore, other panelists included Dr. Leroy Hood,
 President and Director of the Institute for Systems Biology; Dr. Donald
 Kennedy, Editor-in-Chief of Science and President Emeritus, Stanford
 University; and Dr. Charles Sanders, Retired Chairman and CEO of Glaxo, Inc.
     The American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) is the nation's leading
 non-profit organization dedicated to the support of AIDS research, AIDS
 prevention, treatment education, and the advocacy of sound AIDS-related public
 policy.  Since 1985, amfAR has invested nearly $175 million in support for its
 programs and awarded grants to more than 1,850 research teams worldwide.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X76177719
 
 SOURCE  American Foundation for AIDS Research