ASNR Meeting Brings Diverse Health Issues Into Focus: A Sharper Image of Stroke, Alzheimers, Brain Tumors, Back-Pain Treatment, The Pediatric Brain

Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Society of Neuroradiology

    OAK BROOK, Ill., April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- The burgeoning use of
 neuroimaging techniques to benefit research, diagnosis and treatment of some
 of medicine's most persistent issues will be evident when the American Society
 of Neuroradiology (ASNR) convenes its 39th Annual Meeting, April 21-27, at the
 Hynes Convention Center, Boston.
     A keynote presentation by Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner, recognized for
 his discovery of the prion (a causative agent in diseases such as bovine
 spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease), will address the relevance of
 his research to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease.
 Other renowned presenters include Dr. Judah Folkman, whose pioneering work on
 angiogenesis has transformed cancer research and manifested new pharmaceutical
 treatment options.  Dr. Mitchel Berger will speak on the use of radiological
 imaging to guide surgeons during brain-tumor surgery.
     Brain tumor imaging and therapy, minimally invasive treatment of
 aneurysms, and acute stroke detection represent some of the most significant
 topics for an international audience of approximately 1,500 physicians and
 others.  More than 750 oral and paper presentations will showcase the breadth
 of neuroimaging research, which spans multiple sclerosis, ADHD, Parkinson's
 disease, epilepsy, dyslexia, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, spinal diseases,
 brain function and development, and many other areas.
     "The advances in imaging technologies, such as MR imaging, MR
 spectroscopy, CT and image-guided surgery are finding increased application
 not only in the diagnosis of neurologic diseases, but also have been critical
 to the development of minimally invasive treatments.  More precise diagnoses
 through imaging improves patient outcome, and benefits all patients with
 neurologic disorders," says Dr. William Dillon, ASNR program chair and
 incoming president.  A new technique called vertebroplasty uses an image-
 guided needle to inject acrylic cement into spinal compression fractures to
 relieve severe back pain.  To treat vascular diseases, interventional
 neuroradiologists use microcatheters to thread coils and stents through blood
 vessels.
     Significant presentations are listed at http://www.asnr.org/2001/press ,
 and all presentation summaries can be searched via the Program Planner at
 http://www.asnr.org/2001 .
     The meeting also features exhibits of the latest technologies from GE
 Medical Systems, Siemens, Berlex, Philips, Marconi, Bracco Diagnostics,
 Nycomed and dozens of other companies.
     ASNR is a not-for-profit association of 3,000 physicians and others
 dedicated to the advancement of neuroimaging in diagnosis and treatment of
 neurological disorders.
 
     Contact:  Angelo Artemakis, 630-574-0220, ext. 227, aartemakis@asnr.org or
 James Gantenberg, ext. 224, jgantenberg@asnr.org , both of the American
 Society of Neuroradiology
 
 

SOURCE American Society of Neuroradiology
    OAK BROOK, Ill., April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- The burgeoning use of
 neuroimaging techniques to benefit research, diagnosis and treatment of some
 of medicine's most persistent issues will be evident when the American Society
 of Neuroradiology (ASNR) convenes its 39th Annual Meeting, April 21-27, at the
 Hynes Convention Center, Boston.
     A keynote presentation by Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner, recognized for
 his discovery of the prion (a causative agent in diseases such as bovine
 spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease), will address the relevance of
 his research to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease.
 Other renowned presenters include Dr. Judah Folkman, whose pioneering work on
 angiogenesis has transformed cancer research and manifested new pharmaceutical
 treatment options.  Dr. Mitchel Berger will speak on the use of radiological
 imaging to guide surgeons during brain-tumor surgery.
     Brain tumor imaging and therapy, minimally invasive treatment of
 aneurysms, and acute stroke detection represent some of the most significant
 topics for an international audience of approximately 1,500 physicians and
 others.  More than 750 oral and paper presentations will showcase the breadth
 of neuroimaging research, which spans multiple sclerosis, ADHD, Parkinson's
 disease, epilepsy, dyslexia, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, spinal diseases,
 brain function and development, and many other areas.
     "The advances in imaging technologies, such as MR imaging, MR
 spectroscopy, CT and image-guided surgery are finding increased application
 not only in the diagnosis of neurologic diseases, but also have been critical
 to the development of minimally invasive treatments.  More precise diagnoses
 through imaging improves patient outcome, and benefits all patients with
 neurologic disorders," says Dr. William Dillon, ASNR program chair and
 incoming president.  A new technique called vertebroplasty uses an image-
 guided needle to inject acrylic cement into spinal compression fractures to
 relieve severe back pain.  To treat vascular diseases, interventional
 neuroradiologists use microcatheters to thread coils and stents through blood
 vessels.
     Significant presentations are listed at http://www.asnr.org/2001/press ,
 and all presentation summaries can be searched via the Program Planner at
 http://www.asnr.org/2001 .
     The meeting also features exhibits of the latest technologies from GE
 Medical Systems, Siemens, Berlex, Philips, Marconi, Bracco Diagnostics,
 Nycomed and dozens of other companies.
     ASNR is a not-for-profit association of 3,000 physicians and others
 dedicated to the advancement of neuroimaging in diagnosis and treatment of
 neurological disorders.
 
     Contact:  Angelo Artemakis, 630-574-0220, ext. 227, aartemakis@asnr.org or
 James Gantenberg, ext. 224, jgantenberg@asnr.org , both of the American
 Society of Neuroradiology
 
 SOURCE  American Society of Neuroradiology