Atria Retirement and Assisted Living Celebrates Good Nutrition for Women; Women Represent Approximately 75% of Assisted Living Residents

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from Atria Retirement and Assisted Living

    LOUISVILLE, Ky., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- April 8-14 is National Women's
 Nutrition Week.  Created to recognize the importance of good nutrition for the
 development of the female body, Women's Nutrition Week promotes healthy-eating
 habits to provide support for the many changes that occur in a woman's
 biochemistry.  To recognize and celebrate this special time, many of the
 nearly 100 Atria Retirement and Assisted Living communities across the country
 are hosting events during the entire month that focus on women's nutrition.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010410/CHTUFNS1 )
     Atria communities in Dallas and Houston will host events April 9-11
 featuring Former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller.  The senior-services
 provider has partnered with Chef Haller, who served in his White House
 position for 22 years, and regularly features on its menus some of the same
 dishes Chef Haller served to Presidents Reagan, Carter, Ford, Nixon and
 Johnson.  As part of the alliance, Chef Haller also consults with Atria chefs
 and residents, and stresses the importance of healthful eating.
     Additionally, Atria St. Matthews, in Louisville, Kentucky, together with
 culinary arts students from Sullivan College, a private college in the city,
 will host a Women's Nutrition Expo on April 18.  Expert chefs and "chefs in
 training" will prepare healthy dishes for sampling while cardiovascular
 experts lead discussions on the benefits of healthy eating.
     Also in recognition of Women's Nutrition Week, Atria offers the following
 nutrition tips that may help prevent three diseases that affect a growing
 number of American women: cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and breast
 cancer.
 
     Cardiovascular Disease
     Once considered a "man's disease," cardiovascular disease (heart attack
 and stroke) is the number one killer of women.  The American Heart Association
 notes that most cardiovascular disease is preventable.  Eating a low-
 saturated-fat, low-cholesterol diet can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular
 disease.  The association gives these 10 diet suggestions for lowering fat and
 cholesterol in diets.
 
     1.  Eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables every day.
     2.  Eat foods that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol.
     3.  Count calories.  Balance the calories you eat with regular physical
         activity.
     4.  Look for the American Heart Association's heart-check mark on foods
         that make up a heart-healthy diet.
     5.  Keep your weight at an appropriate level for your height, frame and
         age.
     6.  Consume plenty of fiber, including whole grains, beans, fruits and
         vegetables.
     7.  Eat fish or vegetarian meals 3-4 times a week.
     8.  Avoid or limit products that contain cream, egg yolks, coconut or palm
         kernel oil, lard, butter and hydrogenated fat or oil.
     9.  Eat fish, chicken and turkey without the skin.
     10. Use any cooking method other than frying.  Cook in non-stick pans and
         use spray oils.
 
     Osteoporosis
     Osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a disease characterized by low bone mass
 and deterioration of bone tissue leading to an increased susceptibility to
 fractures.  According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, bones are
 living tissues that provide structural support for muscles, protect vital
 organs, and store the calcium essential for bone density and strength.
 Because bones are constantly changing, they can be affected by diet and
 exercise.  Osteoporosis is a health threat to more than 28 million Americans,
 80 percent of whom are women.  Osteoporosis produces no symptoms and is very
 difficult to detect before a fracture occurs.
 
     Factors that increase the likelihood of developing osteoporosis are:
 
     * being female
     * thin and/or small frame
     * advanced age
     * a family history of osteoporosis
     * post-menopause
     * a diet low in calcium
     * an inactive lifestyle
 
     The National Osteoporosis Foundation states that building strong bones
 during childhood and adolescence can be the best defense against developing
 osteoporosis later in life.  Following these steps may also help prevent the
 disease:
 
     * Eat a balanced diet rich in calcium and vitamin D.
     * Participate in weight-bearing exercise.  It puts stress on bones and
       encourages regeneration of bone mass.
     * Maintain a healthy lifestyle.  Do not smoke and limit alcohol intake.
 
     Breast Cancer
     The American Cancer Society notes that breast cancer is the most common
 cancer among women other than skin cancer.  Improved diagnostic techniques
 have enabled women to either prevent breast cancer or live longer with the
 disease.  Even though the role lifestyle and diet play in preventing the
 disease is not yet clear, it is recommended that women eat a variety of
 healthy foods, including fresh fruits and vegetables; exercise regularly; and
 limit fat intake particularly from animal sources.
 
     Breast cancer risk factors include:
 
     * a family history of breast cancer, particularly in mother or siblings
     * a past medical history of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer
       or colon cancer
     * early menstruation (before age 12) and/or late menopause (after age 55)
     * no pregnancies or a first pregnancy after age 30
 
     The American Cancer Society maintains the best chance a woman has to fight
 breast cancer is to find it and treat it early.  It suggests that women take
 these steps:
 
     * after age 20, have a nurse or doctor check your breasts every year
     * at age 40, begin having annual screening mammograms
     * be familiar with how your breasts feel and what is "normal" for you;
       examine your breasts every month, and see a doctor if you feel or see
       any changes that don't go away after one menstrual cycle
 
     Atria Retirement and Assisted Living owns and operates nearly 100
 communities in 26 states, many with specialized programs for persons with
 Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.  For more information about Atria,
 contact Melissa O'Brien at 502-719-2327, or visit www.atriacom.com.
 
     Markets with Atria Locations
 
     Auburn, AL                         Portland, ME
     Huntsville, AL                     Kansas City, MO
     Mobile, AL                         Charlotte, NC (3 locations)
     Montgomery, AL                     Burlington-Plattsburg, NH
     Phoenix, AZ                        Albany, NY
     Tucson, AZ (3 locations)           Metropolitan New York (15 locations)
     Chico-Redding, CA                  Rochester, NY (2 locations)
     Denver, CO                         Cincinnati, OH (2 locations)
     Jacksonville, FL (2 locations)     Allentown, PA
     Orlando, FL (2 locations)          Philadelphia, PA
     Tampa-St. Petersburg (3 locations) Pittsburgh, PA
     West Palm Beach, FL                Columbia, SC
     Atlanta, GA (8 locations)          Greenville-Spartanburg, SC
     Augusta, GA                        Chattanooga, TN
     Columbus, GA (2 locations)         Knoxville, TN (2 locations)
     Boise, ID                          Jackson, TN
     Evansville, IN                     Memphis, TN (3 locations)
     Indianapolis, IN                   Dallas-Ft. Worth, TX (5 locations)
     Topeka, KS (2 locations)           Houston, TX (4 locations)
     Elizabethtown, KY                  Lubbock, TX
     Louisville, KY (3 locations)       Tyler, TX (2 locations)
     Boston, MA (2 locations)           Salt Lake City, UT (2 locations)
     Baltimore, MD                      Norfolk, VA
     Salisbury, MD                      Seattle, WA
 
 

SOURCE Atria Retirement and Assisted Living
    LOUISVILLE, Ky., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- April 8-14 is National Women's
 Nutrition Week.  Created to recognize the importance of good nutrition for the
 development of the female body, Women's Nutrition Week promotes healthy-eating
 habits to provide support for the many changes that occur in a woman's
 biochemistry.  To recognize and celebrate this special time, many of the
 nearly 100 Atria Retirement and Assisted Living communities across the country
 are hosting events during the entire month that focus on women's nutrition.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010410/CHTUFNS1 )
     Atria communities in Dallas and Houston will host events April 9-11
 featuring Former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller.  The senior-services
 provider has partnered with Chef Haller, who served in his White House
 position for 22 years, and regularly features on its menus some of the same
 dishes Chef Haller served to Presidents Reagan, Carter, Ford, Nixon and
 Johnson.  As part of the alliance, Chef Haller also consults with Atria chefs
 and residents, and stresses the importance of healthful eating.
     Additionally, Atria St. Matthews, in Louisville, Kentucky, together with
 culinary arts students from Sullivan College, a private college in the city,
 will host a Women's Nutrition Expo on April 18.  Expert chefs and "chefs in
 training" will prepare healthy dishes for sampling while cardiovascular
 experts lead discussions on the benefits of healthy eating.
     Also in recognition of Women's Nutrition Week, Atria offers the following
 nutrition tips that may help prevent three diseases that affect a growing
 number of American women: cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and breast
 cancer.
 
     Cardiovascular Disease
     Once considered a "man's disease," cardiovascular disease (heart attack
 and stroke) is the number one killer of women.  The American Heart Association
 notes that most cardiovascular disease is preventable.  Eating a low-
 saturated-fat, low-cholesterol diet can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular
 disease.  The association gives these 10 diet suggestions for lowering fat and
 cholesterol in diets.
 
     1.  Eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables every day.
     2.  Eat foods that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol.
     3.  Count calories.  Balance the calories you eat with regular physical
         activity.
     4.  Look for the American Heart Association's heart-check mark on foods
         that make up a heart-healthy diet.
     5.  Keep your weight at an appropriate level for your height, frame and
         age.
     6.  Consume plenty of fiber, including whole grains, beans, fruits and
         vegetables.
     7.  Eat fish or vegetarian meals 3-4 times a week.
     8.  Avoid or limit products that contain cream, egg yolks, coconut or palm
         kernel oil, lard, butter and hydrogenated fat or oil.
     9.  Eat fish, chicken and turkey without the skin.
     10. Use any cooking method other than frying.  Cook in non-stick pans and
         use spray oils.
 
     Osteoporosis
     Osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a disease characterized by low bone mass
 and deterioration of bone tissue leading to an increased susceptibility to
 fractures.  According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, bones are
 living tissues that provide structural support for muscles, protect vital
 organs, and store the calcium essential for bone density and strength.
 Because bones are constantly changing, they can be affected by diet and
 exercise.  Osteoporosis is a health threat to more than 28 million Americans,
 80 percent of whom are women.  Osteoporosis produces no symptoms and is very
 difficult to detect before a fracture occurs.
 
     Factors that increase the likelihood of developing osteoporosis are:
 
     * being female
     * thin and/or small frame
     * advanced age
     * a family history of osteoporosis
     * post-menopause
     * a diet low in calcium
     * an inactive lifestyle
 
     The National Osteoporosis Foundation states that building strong bones
 during childhood and adolescence can be the best defense against developing
 osteoporosis later in life.  Following these steps may also help prevent the
 disease:
 
     * Eat a balanced diet rich in calcium and vitamin D.
     * Participate in weight-bearing exercise.  It puts stress on bones and
       encourages regeneration of bone mass.
     * Maintain a healthy lifestyle.  Do not smoke and limit alcohol intake.
 
     Breast Cancer
     The American Cancer Society notes that breast cancer is the most common
 cancer among women other than skin cancer.  Improved diagnostic techniques
 have enabled women to either prevent breast cancer or live longer with the
 disease.  Even though the role lifestyle and diet play in preventing the
 disease is not yet clear, it is recommended that women eat a variety of
 healthy foods, including fresh fruits and vegetables; exercise regularly; and
 limit fat intake particularly from animal sources.
 
     Breast cancer risk factors include:
 
     * a family history of breast cancer, particularly in mother or siblings
     * a past medical history of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer
       or colon cancer
     * early menstruation (before age 12) and/or late menopause (after age 55)
     * no pregnancies or a first pregnancy after age 30
 
     The American Cancer Society maintains the best chance a woman has to fight
 breast cancer is to find it and treat it early.  It suggests that women take
 these steps:
 
     * after age 20, have a nurse or doctor check your breasts every year
     * at age 40, begin having annual screening mammograms
     * be familiar with how your breasts feel and what is "normal" for you;
       examine your breasts every month, and see a doctor if you feel or see
       any changes that don't go away after one menstrual cycle
 
     Atria Retirement and Assisted Living owns and operates nearly 100
 communities in 26 states, many with specialized programs for persons with
 Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.  For more information about Atria,
 contact Melissa O'Brien at 502-719-2327, or visit www.atriacom.com.
 
     Markets with Atria Locations
 
     Auburn, AL                         Portland, ME
     Huntsville, AL                     Kansas City, MO
     Mobile, AL                         Charlotte, NC (3 locations)
     Montgomery, AL                     Burlington-Plattsburg, NH
     Phoenix, AZ                        Albany, NY
     Tucson, AZ (3 locations)           Metropolitan New York (15 locations)
     Chico-Redding, CA                  Rochester, NY (2 locations)
     Denver, CO                         Cincinnati, OH (2 locations)
     Jacksonville, FL (2 locations)     Allentown, PA
     Orlando, FL (2 locations)          Philadelphia, PA
     Tampa-St. Petersburg (3 locations) Pittsburgh, PA
     West Palm Beach, FL                Columbia, SC
     Atlanta, GA (8 locations)          Greenville-Spartanburg, SC
     Augusta, GA                        Chattanooga, TN
     Columbus, GA (2 locations)         Knoxville, TN (2 locations)
     Boise, ID                          Jackson, TN
     Evansville, IN                     Memphis, TN (3 locations)
     Indianapolis, IN                   Dallas-Ft. Worth, TX (5 locations)
     Topeka, KS (2 locations)           Houston, TX (4 locations)
     Elizabethtown, KY                  Lubbock, TX
     Louisville, KY (3 locations)       Tyler, TX (2 locations)
     Boston, MA (2 locations)           Salt Lake City, UT (2 locations)
     Baltimore, MD                      Norfolk, VA
     Salisbury, MD                      Seattle, WA
 
 SOURCE  Atria Retirement and Assisted Living