AT&T Reaction to Qwest's Scheduled Efforts to Enter Long Distance Business

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from AT&T

    DENVER, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The following statement may be attributed
 to Tom Pelto, AT&T Vice President, AT&T Law and Government Affairs, Western
 Region, regarding Qwest's (NYSE:   Q) efforts to enter the long distance market
 after the completion of operational support systems (OSS) testing and
 scheduled state workshops.
 
     April 10, 2001
 
     "The testing of Qwest's operational support systems (OSS) is just
 starting.  AT&T (NYSE:   T) will continue to wait and see how their systems
 actually perform before calling the outcome.  Let's not confuse the start of
 this test with success."
     "Every other Bell Operating Company has struggled to pass, in some cases
 quite mightily, and AT&T has seen nothing that suggests that Qwest will not be
 similarly challenged.  In addition, Qwest systems have encountered substantial
 problems in a similar performance test in Arizona.  Since they've had this
 obligation for more than five years, I rate the start of a test as, at most, a
 very modest achievement."
     "AT&T has yet to see positive performance from Qwest systems.  They
 refused for eight months to test with AT&T in Minnesota, forcing us to lodge a
 complaint with the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission.  It appears Qwest
 has something to hide."
     "There is also a vast gap between Qwest's hype and its deeds.  For
 example, in Washington the Commission has not only found that substantial
 deficiencies exist with Qwest's performance, but last week condemned Qwest's
 conduct in ripping out AT&T's wires, locking its boxes and even calling the
 police to prevent interconnection.  This is as flagrant a disregard of the law
 as we've seen from any company, at any time, in any place.  This conduct was
 neither isolated nor accidental."
     "Consider this:  If Qwest's markets were truly open, why are competitors
 failing on a daily basis?  If we were looking for column inches instead of
 competitive markets, then Qwest could clearly claim progress.  However, the
 Regional Oversight Committee (ROC) will measure whether Qwest passes based on
 performance, not press releases."
 
       Tom Pelto
       AT&T Vice President
       AT&T Law and Government Affairs
       Western Region
 
 

SOURCE AT&T
    DENVER, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The following statement may be attributed
 to Tom Pelto, AT&T Vice President, AT&T Law and Government Affairs, Western
 Region, regarding Qwest's (NYSE:   Q) efforts to enter the long distance market
 after the completion of operational support systems (OSS) testing and
 scheduled state workshops.
 
     April 10, 2001
 
     "The testing of Qwest's operational support systems (OSS) is just
 starting.  AT&T (NYSE:   T) will continue to wait and see how their systems
 actually perform before calling the outcome.  Let's not confuse the start of
 this test with success."
     "Every other Bell Operating Company has struggled to pass, in some cases
 quite mightily, and AT&T has seen nothing that suggests that Qwest will not be
 similarly challenged.  In addition, Qwest systems have encountered substantial
 problems in a similar performance test in Arizona.  Since they've had this
 obligation for more than five years, I rate the start of a test as, at most, a
 very modest achievement."
     "AT&T has yet to see positive performance from Qwest systems.  They
 refused for eight months to test with AT&T in Minnesota, forcing us to lodge a
 complaint with the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission.  It appears Qwest
 has something to hide."
     "There is also a vast gap between Qwest's hype and its deeds.  For
 example, in Washington the Commission has not only found that substantial
 deficiencies exist with Qwest's performance, but last week condemned Qwest's
 conduct in ripping out AT&T's wires, locking its boxes and even calling the
 police to prevent interconnection.  This is as flagrant a disregard of the law
 as we've seen from any company, at any time, in any place.  This conduct was
 neither isolated nor accidental."
     "Consider this:  If Qwest's markets were truly open, why are competitors
 failing on a daily basis?  If we were looking for column inches instead of
 competitive markets, then Qwest could clearly claim progress.  However, the
 Regional Oversight Committee (ROC) will measure whether Qwest passes based on
 performance, not press releases."
 
       Tom Pelto
       AT&T Vice President
       AT&T Law and Government Affairs
       Western Region
 
 SOURCE  AT&T

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