Behind the Scenes, Sandbaggers Fill Bags Free of Charge

Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Sandbagger Corp.

    WAUCONDA, Ill. and DAVENPORT, Iowa, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News
 Release/ -- Sandbags by the tens of thousands are being filled by sandbagging
 machines loaned free of charge by The Sandbagger Corp., Wauconda, Illinois, to
 communities along the Mississippi River.
     Nine machines capable of filling 1,600 sandbags an hour were donated by
 Stacey Kanzler, president, because she said "This is the right thing to do in
 this emergency."
     Kanzler said other communities downstream that will need help for filling
 sandbags should call the company at 800-770-SAND.
     Earlier today (April 24) the chief construction inspector for Davenport,
 told Dan Stoye, director of international and military sales for the
 Sandbagger Corp., that without the machines, the city of Davenport would have
 no water as the water plant would have been flooded. His additional actual
 quote: "without these sandbagging machines we would be in deep dodo."
     An Iowa National Guard lieutenant yesterday said the sandbagging machines
 saved the dikes; without them the water would be pouring in.
     Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack after a news conference Saturday in Camanche,
 Iowa, walked up to the three Sandbagger representatives there, shook their
 hands and thanked them for helping in Camanche and helping the people of Iowa.
     As of 10:30 a.m. today (April 24) the five sandbagging machines in
 Davenport had turned out 22,000 more sandbags. Trucks were loaded with the
 sandbags as soon as they arrived to carry the bags to dikes holding back the
 river.
     The sandbagging machines were invented by Kanzler when she saw the
 horrible flooding and misery from the record 1993 flooding of the Mississippi
 and other Iowa rivers.  She designed and had sandbaggers built that she took
 to St. Elmo, Illinois, and locations in Missouri where leaders later sent
 letters thanking her for saving their communities.
     Sand is dumped into a hopper on the machines.  Up to four operators using
 a foot pedal on each of four chutes controls the sand flow into each one where
 a sandbag is located and filled.  Kanzler said she loves it when people who
 have been slowly filling sandbags with a shovel, cheer after they see the
 machine in operation.
 
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SOURCE The Sandbagger Corp.
    WAUCONDA, Ill. and DAVENPORT, Iowa, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News
 Release/ -- Sandbags by the tens of thousands are being filled by sandbagging
 machines loaned free of charge by The Sandbagger Corp., Wauconda, Illinois, to
 communities along the Mississippi River.
     Nine machines capable of filling 1,600 sandbags an hour were donated by
 Stacey Kanzler, president, because she said "This is the right thing to do in
 this emergency."
     Kanzler said other communities downstream that will need help for filling
 sandbags should call the company at 800-770-SAND.
     Earlier today (April 24) the chief construction inspector for Davenport,
 told Dan Stoye, director of international and military sales for the
 Sandbagger Corp., that without the machines, the city of Davenport would have
 no water as the water plant would have been flooded. His additional actual
 quote: "without these sandbagging machines we would be in deep dodo."
     An Iowa National Guard lieutenant yesterday said the sandbagging machines
 saved the dikes; without them the water would be pouring in.
     Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack after a news conference Saturday in Camanche,
 Iowa, walked up to the three Sandbagger representatives there, shook their
 hands and thanked them for helping in Camanche and helping the people of Iowa.
     As of 10:30 a.m. today (April 24) the five sandbagging machines in
 Davenport had turned out 22,000 more sandbags. Trucks were loaded with the
 sandbags as soon as they arrived to carry the bags to dikes holding back the
 river.
     The sandbagging machines were invented by Kanzler when she saw the
 horrible flooding and misery from the record 1993 flooding of the Mississippi
 and other Iowa rivers.  She designed and had sandbaggers built that she took
 to St. Elmo, Illinois, and locations in Missouri where leaders later sent
 letters thanking her for saving their communities.
     Sand is dumped into a hopper on the machines.  Up to four operators using
 a foot pedal on each of four chutes controls the sand flow into each one where
 a sandbag is located and filled.  Kanzler said she loves it when people who
 have been slowly filling sandbags with a shovel, cheer after they see the
 machine in operation.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X86801159
 
 SOURCE  The Sandbagger Corp.