Best of Lean Manufacturers Recognized for Excellence by Shingo Prize

Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from Utah State University, College of Business

    LOGAN, Utah, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Shingo Prize for Excellence in
 Manufacturing selection committee announced today the recipients of its 13th
 annual awards.  One Canadian manufacturing facility and five U.S. plants have
 earned this prestigious award for 2001.
     According to the Shingo Prize administrators, this program is the only
 industrial excellence award that focuses on lean manufacturing, or the
 elimination of waste.
     "We're unique in the criteria by which we judge," explained Ross Robson,
 Shingo Prize executive director.  "We honor companies for streamlining their
 processes and cutting out the waste, which is something that was first
 implemented in the Toyota Production System years ago."
     The Shingo Prize is named in honor of the late Dr. Shigeo Shingo, an
 engineering genius who helped create the Toyota Production System and other
 related lean manufacturing processes.
     "We're very excited by the innovation and excellence we found in place at
 the facilities of each of this year's Shingo Prize recipients," said Robson.
 "In a time of such economic uncertainty, it's a comfort to see the measures
 leading corporations are taking to ensure they aren't wasting precious
 resources."
 
     And the winners are ...
     This year's Shingo Prize recipients are Baxter Healthcare Corporation,
 Benteler Automotive, Ford Motor Co. (2 plants), Freudenberg-NOK and Johnson
 Controls, Inc.  The plants recognized for each company are:
 
     Baxter Healthcare Corporation (BHC), Mountain Home, Ark. -- This facility
 specializes in the manufacture of medical device products such as human
 blood/plasma separation devices, kidney dialysis units, intravenous products
 used to administer medicine and nutrition, and is the largest medical grade
 plastics manufacturer in the world.  The use of lean production has reduced
 lead-time by 84% and improved on-time delivery to more than 99%.  BHC is the
 principal U.S. subsidiary of Baxter International Inc.
 
     Benteler Automotive, Hagen Exhaust Facility, Grand Rapids, Mich. -- This
 advanced facility is one of the world's largest producers of hot-end
 fabricated exhaust system products, including exclusive hydroforming
 technologies used to produce patented air-gap manifolds and related exhaust
 products.  Their many milestone achievements resulting from the implementation
 of lean manufacturing principles include: 40% scrap rate reduction, increased
 inventory turns, double-digit productivity gains, and improved on-time
 delivery performance.
 
     Ford Essex Engine Plant (EEP), Windsor, Canada -- At this plant, Ford
 manufactures three different configuration V6-style engines on a single
 assembly line with a "batch of one" capability, which significantly reduces
 line side inventory.  EEP produces 3.8L & 4.2L Rear Wheel Drive V6s and a 3.8L
 Front Wheel Drive V6, in addition to V8 cylinder blocks and V10 crankshafts
 for Windsor Engine Plant.  The plant achieved 100% on-time delivery and
 improved first time through quality by 32% from 1996 through 2000.
 
     Ford Ohio Assembly Plant (OHAP), Avon Lake, Ohio -- The Ohio Assembly
 Plant is 3.7 million square feet.  It operates the body and paint shop for the
 Ford Econoline and produces complete Mercury Villager and Nissan Quest Mini
 Vans.  Partnered with a unique combination of both Traditional and Modern
 Operating Agreements, Local 2000 UAW, OHAP has produced over 6-million
 complete vehicles.  Through lean manufacturing techniques, OHAP has achieved a
 warranty improvement of 22% for Econoline and 11% for Villager.  Additionally,
 the Villager/Quest has realized a 39% improvement in the "things gone wrong"
 customer quality survey.
 
     Freudenberg-NOK, Cleveland, Ga. -- This facility was the first of its kind
 built specifically for one-piece flow manufacturing.  The plant produces valve
 stem seals, crankshaft seals, camshaft seals, transmission shaft seals and
 powertrain oil seals.  The Cleveland facility has incurred zero warranty costs
 over the last three years and, since 1997, has achieved a 54% reduction in
 scrap, a 27% increase in productivity and a 97% reduction in PPM rejection
 rates.
 
     Johnson Controls, Inc., Greenfield, Ohio -- This plant, part of the
 company's Automotive Systems Group, is a polyurethane foam manufacturing
 facility producing more than 25,000 pieces per day for use in vehicle seating
 products.  Customers include Honda, Lear and two Johnson Controls assembly
 plants.  Utilizing lean production principles and techniques, the facility has
 achieved more than 98% machine utilization, has averaged over 100 inventory
 turns over a period of three years and has reduced scrap as a percent of sales
 to less than one percent.
 
     The Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing is administered by the
 College of Business, Utah State University, in cooperation with several
 distinguished non-profit and corporate organizations.  Referred to by Business
 Week magazine as "... the Nobel Prize of manufacturing ..." (May 15, 2000),
 the award is given annually to manufacturers in the United States, Canada and
 Mexico who deliver world-class performance through lean principles and
 techniques in core manufacturing and business processes.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X75617193
 
 

SOURCE Utah State University, College of Business
    LOGAN, Utah, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Shingo Prize for Excellence in
 Manufacturing selection committee announced today the recipients of its 13th
 annual awards.  One Canadian manufacturing facility and five U.S. plants have
 earned this prestigious award for 2001.
     According to the Shingo Prize administrators, this program is the only
 industrial excellence award that focuses on lean manufacturing, or the
 elimination of waste.
     "We're unique in the criteria by which we judge," explained Ross Robson,
 Shingo Prize executive director.  "We honor companies for streamlining their
 processes and cutting out the waste, which is something that was first
 implemented in the Toyota Production System years ago."
     The Shingo Prize is named in honor of the late Dr. Shigeo Shingo, an
 engineering genius who helped create the Toyota Production System and other
 related lean manufacturing processes.
     "We're very excited by the innovation and excellence we found in place at
 the facilities of each of this year's Shingo Prize recipients," said Robson.
 "In a time of such economic uncertainty, it's a comfort to see the measures
 leading corporations are taking to ensure they aren't wasting precious
 resources."
 
     And the winners are ...
     This year's Shingo Prize recipients are Baxter Healthcare Corporation,
 Benteler Automotive, Ford Motor Co. (2 plants), Freudenberg-NOK and Johnson
 Controls, Inc.  The plants recognized for each company are:
 
     Baxter Healthcare Corporation (BHC), Mountain Home, Ark. -- This facility
 specializes in the manufacture of medical device products such as human
 blood/plasma separation devices, kidney dialysis units, intravenous products
 used to administer medicine and nutrition, and is the largest medical grade
 plastics manufacturer in the world.  The use of lean production has reduced
 lead-time by 84% and improved on-time delivery to more than 99%.  BHC is the
 principal U.S. subsidiary of Baxter International Inc.
 
     Benteler Automotive, Hagen Exhaust Facility, Grand Rapids, Mich. -- This
 advanced facility is one of the world's largest producers of hot-end
 fabricated exhaust system products, including exclusive hydroforming
 technologies used to produce patented air-gap manifolds and related exhaust
 products.  Their many milestone achievements resulting from the implementation
 of lean manufacturing principles include: 40% scrap rate reduction, increased
 inventory turns, double-digit productivity gains, and improved on-time
 delivery performance.
 
     Ford Essex Engine Plant (EEP), Windsor, Canada -- At this plant, Ford
 manufactures three different configuration V6-style engines on a single
 assembly line with a "batch of one" capability, which significantly reduces
 line side inventory.  EEP produces 3.8L & 4.2L Rear Wheel Drive V6s and a 3.8L
 Front Wheel Drive V6, in addition to V8 cylinder blocks and V10 crankshafts
 for Windsor Engine Plant.  The plant achieved 100% on-time delivery and
 improved first time through quality by 32% from 1996 through 2000.
 
     Ford Ohio Assembly Plant (OHAP), Avon Lake, Ohio -- The Ohio Assembly
 Plant is 3.7 million square feet.  It operates the body and paint shop for the
 Ford Econoline and produces complete Mercury Villager and Nissan Quest Mini
 Vans.  Partnered with a unique combination of both Traditional and Modern
 Operating Agreements, Local 2000 UAW, OHAP has produced over 6-million
 complete vehicles.  Through lean manufacturing techniques, OHAP has achieved a
 warranty improvement of 22% for Econoline and 11% for Villager.  Additionally,
 the Villager/Quest has realized a 39% improvement in the "things gone wrong"
 customer quality survey.
 
     Freudenberg-NOK, Cleveland, Ga. -- This facility was the first of its kind
 built specifically for one-piece flow manufacturing.  The plant produces valve
 stem seals, crankshaft seals, camshaft seals, transmission shaft seals and
 powertrain oil seals.  The Cleveland facility has incurred zero warranty costs
 over the last three years and, since 1997, has achieved a 54% reduction in
 scrap, a 27% increase in productivity and a 97% reduction in PPM rejection
 rates.
 
     Johnson Controls, Inc., Greenfield, Ohio -- This plant, part of the
 company's Automotive Systems Group, is a polyurethane foam manufacturing
 facility producing more than 25,000 pieces per day for use in vehicle seating
 products.  Customers include Honda, Lear and two Johnson Controls assembly
 plants.  Utilizing lean production principles and techniques, the facility has
 achieved more than 98% machine utilization, has averaged over 100 inventory
 turns over a period of three years and has reduced scrap as a percent of sales
 to less than one percent.
 
     The Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing is administered by the
 College of Business, Utah State University, in cooperation with several
 distinguished non-profit and corporate organizations.  Referred to by Business
 Week magazine as "... the Nobel Prize of manufacturing ..." (May 15, 2000),
 the award is given annually to manufacturers in the United States, Canada and
 Mexico who deliver world-class performance through lean principles and
 techniques in core manufacturing and business processes.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X75617193
 
 SOURCE  Utah State University, College of Business