BET/CBS News Poll of African Americans Finds Mistrust, Disenfranchisement Heading Into Elections

As Democratic and Republican Conventions Approach, African-American

Voters Not Enthusiastic About Either Bush or Kerry



Disdain for Bush is Overwhelming, But Enthusiasm for Kerry is Still Muted



Jul 21, 2004, 01:00 ET from BET (Black Entertainment Television) from ,CBS News

    WASHINGTON, July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- In the most comprehensive election-
 year study of registered African-American voters ever by a news organization,
 a BET/CBS News poll shows support is still muted for presumed Democratic
 Presidential nominee Senator John Kerry (D-Massachusetts), while disdain for
 the policies of President George W. Bush and his administration is
 overwhelming.  The poll was conducted by the CBS News Election and Survey Unit
 using a series of questions developed by BET NIGHTLY NEWS and BET.com, the
 country's leading Internet platform for African Americans and a subsidiary of
 BET.  The findings were jointly released today by both organizations.
     While the trending of some sentiment among the nearly 1,000 African
 Americans surveyed was not surprising, other results point to mistrust of the
 overall voting process that stems from the controversial ending to the 2000
 Presidential Election.  Further revelations identify jobs and the economy as
 the most important issues to get African Americans to the polls in November;
 while a whopping nine in ten persons surveyed feel that the war in Iraq has
 not been worth the financial and human sacrifice.  There is also strong
 opinion that the United States is headed in the wrong policy direction under
 Bush's leadership.
     "These data points are of historic significance not only for the
 comprehensive nature of the survey, but also for the issues clearly identified
 for both Democrats and Republicans to note as the elections draw closer," said
 Pamela Gentry, BET NIGHTLY NEWS Washington Bureau Chief and Senior Producer.
 "There are some clear warning signs that the Democrats should heed, and not
 assume rampant support from African Americans in November based simply on
 traditional voting patterns.  While we found a nearly 8-to-1 margin in favor
 of Senator Kerry over President Bush, the respondents have not found the Kerry
 platform overly impressive."
     "Republicans should also pay attention to the fact that in spite of their
 outreach efforts, there's still a feeling among African Americans that they're
 being largely ignored by the GOP," Gentry added.
     "It is rare in an election year that we have the opportunity to focus on
 this important group of voters, and this collaboration with BET helps us
 understand the intensity and complexity of feelings that explain the more
 unusual poll findings about African Americans," said Kathleen Frankovic,
 Director of Surveys and Producer for CBS News.
     The survey, conducted by the CBS News Election and Survey Unit, comprised
 telephone calls with 986 African Americans.  Executives with BET.com sought to
 be diverse in the questioning as well as comprehensive in the approach.
     "African Americans as a whole will not shy away from sharing opinions when
 approached in the right manner," said Ed Wiley III, Managing Editor for
 BET.com.  "It was important not only to gauge the direction that these
 registered voters were leaning in their thoughts about the November election,
 but also to probe a range of issues relevant to African-American community
 overall.  That's why the survey data includes opinions on such topics as
 affirmative action, youth crime, gay marriage, education and the crisis on the
 continent of Africa."
     BET NIGHTLY NEWS and BET.com will use the findings and analysis from the
 poll as the basis for their coverage of the Democratic National Convention in
 Boston beginning Monday, July 26.  Each night throughout the convention, BET
 NIGHTLY NEWS will share with viewers not only the major convention news of the
 day, but also offer an inside look at the speakers, delegates and political
 process as the DNC formally nominates Senator Kerry and running mate Senator
 John Edwards (D-North Carolina) as its ticket for the November general
 election.  BET News anchor Jacque Reid will pilot each night's coverage,
 backed by a host of reporters, analysts, opinion leaders and celebrity guests.
 BET will shift its election focus to New York starting August 30 for gavel-to-
 gavel coverage of the Republican National Convention.  BET NIGHTLY NEWS
 televises Monday through Friday at 11 p.m. ET/PT.  Heather Vincent is the
 Executive Producer.
     CBS News conducted telephone interviews on behalf of BET with 986 African-
 American adults between July 6-15, 2004, of which 868 were registered to vote.
 The sample of respondents came from households where an African-American adult
 had previously been interviewed for CBS News polls.  The error due to sampling
 could be plus or minus three percentage points for results based on the entire
 sample.  Additional methodological information can be found with the complete
 poll results at http://www.cbsnews.com and http://www.bet.com.
 
     Complete results of the BET/CBS News Poll are below.
 
     ABOUT BET.COM
     BET Interactive's signature offering BET.com is the country's leading on-
 line media platform for African Americans.  Averaging over 5.7 million
 visitors per month, BET.com has received numerous accolades for its content
 and community applications including awards from the National Association of
 Black Journalists, Scripps-Howard Media, Interactive Design magazine and Black
 Enterprise.  BET Interactive is a division of Viacom (NYSE:   VIA; VIA.B)  and a
 subsidiary BET, the nation's leading television network providing quality
 entertainment, music, news and public affairs programming for the African-
 American audience.  The BET Network reaches more than 78 million households
 according to Nielsen Media Research, and can be seen in the United States,
 Canada and the Caribbean.
 
     ABOUT CBS NEWS
     The CBS News Division operates a worldwide news organization serving the
 CBS Television and Radio Networks with regularly scheduled news and public
 affairs broadcasts -- including, among others, the CBS EVENING NEWS WITH DAN
 RATHER, THE EARLY SHOW, 60 MINUTES, 60 MINUTES II, 48 HOURS, FACE THE NATION
 and SUNDAY MORNING -- and special reports on breaking news.  The division
 maintains 18 news bureaus and offices in the United States and abroad in
 addition to its world headquarters in New York.
 
     Visit Us @ http://www.BET.com
 
 
 
                   2004 BET/CBS News Poll - Executive Summary
 
     Here are some highlights from the 2004 BET/CBS News Poll of African
 American voters:
 
     * While many observers talk of political polarization in the U.S. this
 election year, the African American community is unified on key measures: nine
 in ten think the country is headed in the wrong direction, and nine in ten
 think the war in Iraq was not worth the costs.
 
     * Senator John Kerry leads President George W. Bush by a wide margin of 8
 to 1 among African American voters.  But these voters have yet to feel a great
 deal of enthusiasm about their candidate this year; most are just "satisfied"
 having Kerry atop the ticket.
 
     * African American voters express widespread negative views of President
 Bush.  But this is not much different from black voters' views of George H.W.
 Bush or Ronald Reagan when they were president.
 
     * The number one policy issue -- by a wide margin -- that could mobilize
 African American voters this year is the economy and jobs.  Job insecurity is
 no doubt part of the problem; compared to voters overall, more black voters
 are concerned about losing a job. And these voters think the way to provide
 more jobs for African Americans is through government training and employment
 programs.
 
     * Strong resentment remains over the 2000 election -- but it is fueling
 motivation to get back to the polls in 2004, and right the wrongs that
 African-Americans believe took place. Most are more motivated to get to the
 polls this year because of Florida 2000. More than 4 in 5 believe Bush did not
 legitimately win the election, and two thirds think there are deliberate
 attempts made to prevent black voters' votes from being counted.
 
     * African Americans generally feel the Democratic Party reaches out to
 them, though about one-third believe the party takes black voters for granted.
 However, the majority of African American voters say they are ignored entirely
 by the GOP.
 
     * African Americans are somewhat more conservative on the issue of same
 sex marriage than the nation's voters as a whole. Most believe there should be
 no legal recognition -- neither marriage nor civil unions -- for same sex
 couples.
 
     * Few African Americans see school vouchers as the primary way to improve
 education opportunities; most would prefer to see more money spent on public
 schools, or new districts drawn.
 
     * African Americans believe that better preparation at the elementary
 school level -- and not more spaces set aside in the admissions process --
 would do the most to ensure that more African Americans go to college.
 
     * African Americans overwhelmingly back more community programs -- and not
 harsher jail terms -- as the best way to address the problem of youth crime.
 
 
 
                      AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE 2004 VOTE
                               July 6 - 15, 2004
 
     This BET/CBS News Poll confirms that African American voters are
 continuing in their traditional Democratic voting patterns: by a wide 8 to 1
 margin, Senator John Kerry leads President George W. Bush among black voters.
 But African American voters are not yet enthusiastic about the Democratic
 candidate, nor do they think he is as yet talking about the issues that matter
 to them -- but most like and trust him.
     African Americans' strong dislike of incumbent President George W. Bush is
 one important factor in their vote choice.  But so is the memory of the
 disputed Florida 2000 election and that controversy is also a cause of deep
 suspicion. Most African American voters say President Bush did not win the
 2000 election legitimately, and for some, the events of 2000 have given them
 additional motivation to turn out this year.  At the same time many black
 voters worry that there will be deliberate efforts to discount their votes
 this November.
 
     LOOKING AHEAD TO THE 2004 ELECTION
     Not surprisingly, Democrat John Kerry leads President George W. Bush by a
 margin of about 8 to 1 among African American voters in a heads-up matchup.
 African Americans have historically supported Democratic candidates by large
 margins; in 2000, 90% of black voters cast their ballot for Al Gore, and 9%
 voted for George W. Bush.  Fewer than one in ten don't yet know who they will
 support. Voters as a whole give the ticket of Kerry and Senator John Edwards a
 five-point edge over the Bush-Cheney ticket in the most recent CBS News/New
 York Times poll of July 11-15.
 
                       KERRY VS. BUSH: CHOICE IN NOVEMBER
                              (Registered voters)
                        African Americans      All voters*
     John Kerry                79%                49%
     George Bush               10                 44
 
     *Comparison is to Kerry/Edwards ticket vs. Bush/Cheney ticket
 
     Unlike voters as a whole, black voters are nearly united in their support
 for Kerry.  There are only minor differences among various age, education, and
 income levels, by gender, or by region of the country.
     Three quarters of black voters identify themselves as Democrats.  A few
 say they are Republicans, and 21% are Independents. Voters nationally are more
 closely divided between Democrats and Republicans. 38% say they are Democrats
 today, 31% Republicans, and 31% Independent in the latest CBS News/New York
 Times Poll. Black voters who are Independents are firmly in Kerry's camp; 59%
 support Kerry, and 18% support Bush (Independents are a swing group among all
 voters).
 
     EXPECTATIONS FOR THE 2004 VOTE
     African American voters say they are more engaged in this election than
 they were at this time in 2000.  37% report they are paying a lot of attention
 to the campaign, and another 40% are paying some attention.  At this point in
 the 2000 campaign, just 16% of African American voters were paying a lot of
 attention.
 
                             ATTENTION TO CAMPAIGN
                              (Registered voters)
                                    Now      7/2000
               A lot                37%       16%
               Some                 40        47
               Not much             19        27
               Not at all            5         9
 
     In addition, more voters are likely now than in 2000 to say they will
 definitely vote in November.  83% of African American voters say they will
 definitely vote; in 2000, 71% said the same.  What potential voters say they
 will do in July may not reflect what actually happens in November.
     The events of 2000 are clearly a motivating factor.  The final 2000
 results are still being questioned by almost all African American voters: 85%
 say that George W. Bush did not legitimately win the Presidency in 2000. This
 belief is far more widespread than among whites: asked in March of this year,
 32% of whites say that Bush did not win legitimately.
 
                       DID BUSH LEGITIMATELY WIN IN 2000?
                              (Registered voters)
                      African Americans        Whites
                           (Now)               (3/2004)
            Yes             11%                  63%
            No              85                   32
 
     Half of black voters say they are more likely to turn out this year
 because of the controversial events in Florida in 2000. Many black voters
 claimed they were denied the vote in Florida then; but now, hardly any black
 voters say that would dissuade them from voting in 2004.
 
                 HAVE THE EVENTS OF FLORIDA 2000 MADE YOU ... ?
                 More likely to vote in 2004             51%
                 Less likely to vote in 2004              3
                 Make no difference in '04 voting        45
 
     Yet while they may be eager to get back to the polls in 2004, some black
 voters are suspicious about what may happen there. Less than half - 41% - have
 a lot of confidence that their votes will be counted properly in November. 39%
 have some confidence, while 17% have little confidence.
 
          HOW MUCH CONFIDENCE THAT YOUR VOTE WILL BE COUNTED IN 2004?
                              (Registered voters)
                   A lot              41%
                   Some               39
                   Not much/none      17
 
     The mistrust that lingers coincides with a widespread belief that people
 do make deliberate attempts to either thwart African American attempts to
 vote, or to miscount the ballots once cast. Fully two-thirds of African
 Americans believe such malicious attempts are made against African Americans.
 
       ARE THERE DELIBERATE ATTEMPTS TO DISRUPT AFRICAN AMERICAN VOTING?
                              (Registered voters)
                    Yes        68%
                    No         27
 
     In addition, four in ten black voters feel that they are less likely than
 white voters to have their votes correctly tabulated, nearly as many as think
 their votes are as likely to be correctly counted.
 
                 COMPARED TO WHITES, BLACKS IN 2004 WILL BE ...
                              (Registered voters)
           Less likely to have votes counted           41%
           Just as likely to have votes counted        47
 
     VIEWS OF THE CANDIDATES
     Despite their overwhelming support for him, African American voters don't
 yet feel much excitement about John Kerry.   Although 27% say they are
 "enthusiastic" about Kerry's candidacy, more than twice as many, 58%, say they
 are merely "satisfied."
 
                         FEEL ABOUT KERRY'S CANDIDACY:
                              (Registered voters)
                         Enthusiastic             27%
                         Satisfied                58
                         Dissatisfied             10
                         Angry                     1
 
     While they might not be energized by him, these voters do have positive
 views of the Democratic candidate.  Majorities think Kerry has the same
 priorities for the country as they do, is likely to tell them the truth, and
 is highly intelligent.
 
                              VIEWS OF JOHN KERRY
                              (Registered voters)
                                              Yes      No
           Shares your priorities             64%      19
           Likely to tell you the truth       63%      21
 
                               JOHN KERRY IS ...
                              (Registered voters)
                  Highly intelligent             56%
                  Of average intelligence        37
 
     There is some optimism about a Kerry Administration's impact on the lives
 of African Americans, though just as many are likely to expect not much to
 change if he is elected.  Just under half think opportunities for blacks will
 improve if Kerry is elected president.  About as many think there won't be any
 difference.  Hardly any, however, think things will get worse.
 
              IF KERRY IS ELECTED, OPPORTUNITIES FOR BLACKS WILL:
                              (Registered voters)
                Get better          47%
                Stay the same       45
                Get worse            3
 
     Blacks also think Kerry would appoint more African Americans to cabinet
 positions than Bush - despite Bush's very visible appointments of African
 Americans to his Cabinet.
 
            WHO WOULD APPOINT MORE AFRICAN AMERICAN CABINET MEMBERS?
                              (Registered voters)
                     John Kerry          66%
                     George W. Bush      16
                     Both equally         2
                     Neither              3
 
     Black voters may simply have an easier time relating to John Kerry than to
 George W. Bush.  When asked to choose between the two candidates, by a large
 margin black voters even think John Kerry has more soul than George W. Bush.
 
                               WHO HAS MORE SOUL?
                              (Registered voters)
                     John Kerry          64%
                     George W. Bush      11
                     Both equally         2
                     Neither             12
 
     African Americans want to hear both Bush and Kerry talk about the economy,
 jobs and healthcare this year. 29% volunteer the economy or jobs as the top
 issue they want the candidates to discuss, and another 11% name health care.
 21% cite the war in Iraq. And although many African Americans live in urban
 areas that may be more vulnerable to terror attacks, only 2% name terrorism as
 the main issue.
     However, many black voters do not feel either candidate is addressing
 these issues. 46% of those who named an issue think neither Kerry nor Bush is
 talking about it.
 
                 ARE THE CANDIDATES DISCUSSING YOUR TOP ISSUE?
                              (Registered voters)
                 Yes, Kerry is         26%
                 Yes, Bush is           9
                 Yes, both are         14
                 No, neither is        46
 
     BUSH'S WEAKNESSES
     From a low job approval rating to expressions of frustration and even
 anger with the Administration, President George W. Bush receives very little
 support from African American voters in this poll.
     His job approval rating from this group is extremely low; just 11%
 approve, and 85% disapprove.
 
                           BUSH'S JOB APPROVAL RATING
                              (Registered voters)
                    Approve            11%
                    Disapprove         85
 
     Nearly half of black voters are dissatisfied with the administration, and
 over a third say they are angry.
 
                       FEEL ABOUT BUSH'S ADMINISTRATION:
                              (Registered voters)
                Enthusiastic         3%
                Satisfied           11
                Dissatisfied        46
                Angry               37
 
     George W. Bush has never been popular with black voters.  Few approved of
 the job he was doing in the months immediately after he took office.  His job
 approval rating rose among blacks just after the September 11th terrorist
 attacks, as it did among all Americans, but since then it has steadily
 declined.
     George W. Bush is not the only Republican president to be so disliked by
 African American voters.  In the summer of 1992, only one in five black voters
 approved of the job President George H. W. Bush was doing.  In 1988 and 1984,
 President Ronald Reagan's job approval ratings were similarly low.  Still, the
 current president's job approval ratings are even lower than either his
 father's or Reagan's.
     Most black voters think Bush does not share their priorities for the
 country, and is not likely to tell them the truth.  They say he is of average,
 not high, intelligence.
 
                            VIEWS OF GEORGE W. BUSH
                              (Registered voters)
                                              Yes       No
             Shares your priorities            9%       84
             Likely to tell you the truth     12%       79
 
 
                             GEORGE W. BUSH IS ...
                              (Registered voters)
           Highly intelligent            21%
           Of average intelligence       67
 
     THE POLITICAL PARTIES
     The vast majority of African Americans consider themselves Democrats.
 Most say the Democratic party generally tries to reach out to them, although
 about one third - 35% - of African American voters feel that the Democratic
 party takes them for granted. Most African American voters who consider
 themselves Independents believe that the black vote is taken for granted by
 the Democrats, suggesting why they might not declare allegiance to that party.
 
                        DOES THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY ... ?
                              (Registered voters)
                                            All       Independents
     Reach out to black voters              60%            42%
     Take black voters for granted          35             49
 
     Only a handful of African Americans identify themselves as Republicans,
 and most black voters believe that the GOP generally does not try very much to
 change that.  64% say the Republican party ignores the black vote instead of
 reaching out to try to gain some of it; one-third says the GOP does make
 efforts.
 
                        DOES THE REPUBLICAN PARTY ... ?
                              (Registered voters)
     Ignore black voters                64%
     Reach out to black voters          32
 
     There is little expectation that either party will place an African
 American atop its Presidential ticket any time soon. Most - 53% - do not
 believe that a black candidate will win the Democratic party's Presidential
 nomination within the next ten years. This is a very different outlook from
 twenty years ago: in the summer of 1984, as the Reverend Jesse Jackson made
 his first run at the Democratic Party's Presidential nod, 72% of black voters
 -- and 77% of all voters -- believed that an African American would secure a
 Democratic party nomination within thirty years (in essence, by the 2012
 election.)
 
             WILL AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WIN THE DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION
                               WITHIN TEN YEARS?
                              (Registered voters)
                                               1984: Win nomination
                          Now                   within 30 years?
           Yes            40%                        72%
           No             53                         15
 
     Despite the fact that the GOP boasts nationally prominent figures such as
 Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice
 within its ranks, few African American voters foresee any African American
 candidate winning the Republican nomination within ten years; just 18% think
 that will happen.
 
             WILL AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WIN THE REPUBLICAN NOMINATION
                               WITHIN TEN YEARS?
                              (Registered voters)
                     Yes            18%
                     No             78
 
     LEADERSHIP AND THE NATION'S DIRECTION
     Twenty years after his first bid for the presidency, the Reverend Jesse
 Jackson remains atop the list of important national leaders of the African
 American community. Jackson's name was volunteered by 21% of black voters
 asked to name the most important national African American leader, ahead of
 Secretary of State Colin Powell at 13%. Jackson was first among both older and
 younger respondents. The Reverend Al Sharpton, who recently ran for the
 Democratic nomination, was far behind at 4%. Condoleezza Rice was the only
 woman mentioned by more than 1%.  But almost half of all voters could not name
 anyone.
 
                MOST IMPORTANT NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADER?
                              (Registered voters)
                Jesse Jackson            21%
                Colin Powell             13
                Al Sharpton               4
                Kweisi Mfume              3
                Louis Farrakhan           2
                Condoleezza Rice          2
                Don't know/No one        46
 
     A majority of registered voters nationwide think things in this country
 are off on the wrong track, and African American voters are even more
 pessimistic. Nearly all -- 92% -- of African American voters say things in
 this country have pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong track; just 6% say
 things are headed in the right direction.
 
                              DIRECTION OF COUNTRY
                              (Registered voters)
                              African Americans        All (7/2004)
          Right direction            6%                    38%
          Wrong track               92                     55
 
     THE IMPORTANT ISSUES: THE ECONOMY AND IRAQ
     African American voters, like many Americans, are concerned about the
 economy and jobs in this election campaign. They also do not think the war in
 Iraq was worth the costs.
 
     The Economy
     The economy and jobs appear to be the critical issue for many African
 American voters.  46% say this issue will be the most important in getting
 them to vote in November. Jobs and the economy are followed by education with
 19%, the war in Iraq with 14%, and health care with 14%.
 
             WHICH ISSUE WOULD BE MOST IMPORTANT IN GETTING YOU TO
                               VOTE IN NOVEMBER?
                              (Registered voters)
         Jobs and the economy           46%
         Education                      19
         War in Iraq                    14
         Health care                    14
         Drugs                           2
         Crime                           1
 
     Job security -- or at least the perception of it -- is lower among African
 American voters than among voters as a whole.  50% of African-American voters
 are very concerned that they or someone in their household may be out of work
 in the next 12 months, compared to 31% of all voters.  An additional 23% are
 somewhat concerned about losing their job.
 
                  CONCERNED YOU OR SOMEONE IN HOUSEHOLD MAY BE
                          OUT OF WORK IN THE NEXT YEAR
                              (Registered voters)
                             African Americans         All (5/2004)
     Very concerned                 50%                    31%
     Somewhat concerned             23                     29
     Not at all concerned           27                     40
 
     As for which would be a better remedy for providing more jobs to African
 Americans, 57% of black voters choose more government programs that provide
 job training and employment, while 36% choose giving tax incentives or tax
 breaks to encourage businesses to hire workers.
 
 
             WHICH WOULD PROVIDE AFRICAN AMERICANS WITH MORE JOBS?
                              (Registered voters)
             More government programs                 57%
             Tax breaks/incentives for businesses     36
 
     The War in Iraq
     African American voters clearly do not think the war in Iraq was worth the
 loss of life and other costs. Nine in 10 do not think the war in Iraq was
 worth it; just 8% say it was.
     While a majority of voters overall think that the Iraq war was not worth
 the costs, that feeling is less pervasive than it is among African Americans.
 59% of voters overall in a July CBS News/New York Times Poll said the war was
 not worth the costs.
 
                           WAS IRAQ WAR WORTH COSTS?
                              (Registered voters)
                                African Americans        All (7/2004)
                 Yes                   8%                   36%
                 No                   90                    59
 
      African American voters who have family members in the military are no
 more supportive of the Iraq war. 86% of black voters in military households
 say the war was not worth it.
     African Americans have strong ties to the military.  In this poll, 36% of
 African American voters are military family members - that is, either they
 themselves or an immediate family member is currently serving in the U.S.
 military. This number is higher among African Americans than it is among
 voters overall. In a CBS News/New York Times Poll conducted in July, 21% of
 voters nationwide said they were a military family member.
     African American voters, like voters nationwide, are overwhelmingly
 opposed to reinstating the military draft to provide soldiers for the Iraq
 conflict. 82% oppose the draft. Among Americans overall, 70% are opposed to
 it.
     While African American voters may not necessarily support America's
 involvement in Iraq, a large majority say the U.S. should intervene when
 crises occur in Africa. 67% say the U.S. should intervene, 20% say it should
 not, and 7% say it depends on the situation.
 
               SHOULD U.S. INTERVENE WHEN CRISES OCCUR IN AFRICA?
                              (Registered voters)
               Yes                          67%
               No                           20
               It depends (vol.)             7
 
     SOCIAL ISSUES:  SAME-SEX MARRIAGE, EDUCATION AND CRIME
     African American voters are both more conservative and more liberal than
 voters overall on domestic and social issues.   When it comes to education,
 jobs and illegal drugs, African American voters largely support government
 programs to help with these concerns.
     Traditionally, African Americans have been strong supporters of a
 government that provides many services. In November 2003, 69% of African
 American voters said they preferred a bigger government providing more
 services, while just 40% of voters nationwide agreed.
     On one issue, black voters take a more conservative position than the
 public overall -- same sex marriage.
 
     Same-Sex Marriage
     More than half (53%) of African American voters think there should be no
 legal recognition of same-sex relationships.  Among voters overall, 39% share
 this view.
     43% of black voters support some type of legal recognition for same-sex
 couples; among all voters, 59% do.
 
                      SAME-SEX COUPLES SHOULD BE ALLOWED:
                              (Registered voters)
                             African-Americans      All (7/2004)
     To legally marry               21%                 26%
     To form civil unions           22                  33
     No legal recognition           53                  39
 
     Much of the objections are religious ones: among the most devoutly
 religious African Americans (those who attend church weekly), over seven in 10
 think there should be no legal recognition of same-sex relationships.
     Religion is extremely important to many black voters - more important than
 it is to voters overall.  41% of African American voters say they attend
 religious services every week, and an additional 12% say they attend almost
 every week.
     In a CBS News/New York Times poll conducted in June, 26% of voters
 nationwide said they attended religious services every week.
     There are some differences according to age and gender. Among African
 American voters, women are more likely than men to attend religious services
 each week; 45% of black women voters attend services each week, compared to
 35% of black voters who are men.  Older voters attend more frequently than
 younger ones.
 
                         ATTEND RELIGIOUS SERVICES  ...
                              (Registered voters)
                               African Americans       All (6/2004)
                                    All  Men  Women
      Every week                    41%  35%   45%          26%
      Almost every week             12   12    12           12
      Once or twice a month         19   18    20           12
      A few times a year            22   29    16           31
      Never                          6    6     6           18
 
     Education
     African American voters are somewhat divided as to what would do the most
 to make sure African American children receive a good education. 44% think
 changing school district boundaries so that wealthy and poorer schools are
 combined would do the most good, but almost as many - 40% - say more
 government aid sent directly to public schools would do the most.
     One proposal that most African American voters don't see as the best
 solution is school vouchers.  Just one in ten cite this as the best option.
 
            WHICH WOULD MAKE SURE AFRICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN RECEIVE
                               A GOOD EDUCATION?
                              (Registered voters)
            Changing district boundaries            44%
            More government money                   40
            Vouchers                                10
 
     Given a set of choices, blacks say some things would work better than
 quotas to get more African-Americans to attend college.  65% of African-
 American voters say better college preparation in elementary and high school
 would be the best way to help more African Americans attend college. 25% think
 more financial assistance from the federal government would be the best way.
 Only 4% cite more spaces in college set aside specifically for black students
 as the best way to help more African Americans go to college.
 
               WHICH WOULD BE BEST TO HELP MORE AFRICAN AMERICANS
                                 GO TO COLLEGE?
                              (Registered voters)
            Better college preparation             65%
            More financial assistance              25
            More spaces for black students          4
 
 
     Crime and Drugs
     By a wide margin, African American voters see more community programs and
 activities for young people as something that would most help to solve the
 problems of crime and violence among youths in the black community. Less than
 one in five say holding parents legally responsible for the actions of their
 children would help, while just 6% say longer and harsher jail sentences would
 do the most.
 
                    WHICH WOULD DO MOST TO SOLVE CRIME AMONG
                         YOUTHS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY?
                              (Registered voters)
              More community programs              70%
              Holding parents responsible          18
              Longer jail sentences                 6
 
     While majorities of black voters across the board think more community
 programs for youth would help remedy crime and violence, older voters are more
 likely than younger ones to say parents need to be held more responsible for
 their children's actions.
     African American voters are tougher on the issue of illegal drugs.  More
 than a third thinks that more law enforcement crackdowns on drug dealers would
 do the most to help solve this problem.  But again, these voters place a great
 deal of faith in government programs; 28% think drug treatment programs and
 25% think drug education programs are the best bet.
 
                 WHICH WOULD DO MOST TO HELP GET ILLEGAL DRUGS
                          OUT OF THE BLACK COMMUNITY?
                              (Registered voters)
            Law enforcement crackdowns            35%
            More anti-drug programs               25
            More drug treatment programs          28
 
     Blacks differ from voters overall when it comes to support for the death
 penalty.  Most black voters in this poll oppose it. 44% of African American
 voters think a life sentence without parole should be the appropriate
 punishment for persons convicted of murder, while 25% prefer a long prison
 sentence with a chance of parole.  Just 18% support the death penalty for a
 convicted murderer. These views are in stark contrast to those of voters
 nationwide; in an August 2001 CBS News Poll, 44% of voters supported the death
 penalty for those convicted of murder.
 
                     WHAT SHOULD BE THE PENALTY FOR MURDER?
                              (Registered voters)
                                 African Americans      All (8/2001)
      Death penalty                     18%                 44%
      Life sentence with no parole      44%                 29
      Long sentence with parole         25                   8
 
     Affirmative Action
     Even though they say there are better means than quotas to ensure that
 more African-Americans attend college, African American voters strongly
 support affirmative action programs.   76% say such programs should be
 continued for the foreseeable future. 15% think affirmative actions programs
 should be phased out over the next few years, while only 3% think affirmative
 action should end now.
 
                   AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS SHOULD BE  ...
                              (Registered voters)
           Ended now                                     3%
           Phased over next few years                   15
           Continued for foreseeable future             76
 
     While African Americans support affirmative action programs across all
 demographic groups, black voters who describe themselves as conservative are
 more likely to say that affirmative action programs should be ended now or
 phased out. 27% of these conservatives express this view, compared to 18% of
 African American voters overall.
 
 
     METHODOLOGY
     Interviews were conducted among 986 African American adults by telephone.
 Interviews were conducted from July 6-15, 2004, by CBS News on behalf of BET.
 These respondents were part of nationwide representative samples identified in
 households previously interviewed by CBS News Polls.
 
     Weighting
     The sample is weighted to ensure that the distribution of interviews
 mirrors the distribution of the entire population of African-Americans across
 a variety of variables.
 
     The weighting procedures are as follows:
     1.  Each respondent receives a weight inversely proportional to his or her
         probability of selection. This weight is calculated by taking the
         HOUSEHOLD weight from the original source survey times the number of
         members in the household. (For the original adult surveys, weighting
         factors included the number of telephone voice lines in a household
         and respondent demographic characteristics matched to Census data on
         region, age, education, gender and race.)
 
     2.  The weights were then adjusted to match Census Bureau estimates of
         African Americans by sex, age, region of the country and education.
 
     Margin of Error
     The margin of error for this survey is plus or minus three percentage
 points for results based on the entire sample.  That means that 95 times out
 of a hundred, the results are within three percentage points of what they
 would be if the entire universe of African Americans were interviewed. The
 error for subgroups is larger.
 
     National Trend
     Included throughout this analysis are data from CBS News and CBS News/New
 York Times national polls of adults.
 
     Note
     Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
 
 
     q17 How much attention have you been able to pay to the 2004 Presidential
 campaign -- a lot, some, not much, or no attention so far?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %        %     %
     A lot                         37      44     31
     Some                          40      40     40
     Not much                      19      13     23
     No attention so far            5       3      7
     DK/NA                          0       0      0
 
     q18 How likely is it that you will vote in the 2004 election for President
 this November -- would you say you will definitely vote, probably vote,
 probably not vote, or definitely not vote in the election for President?
 
     Definitely vote               83      85     82
     Probably vote                 12      10     13
     Probably not vote              4       4      3
     Definitely not vote            1       1      2
     DK/NA                          0       0      0
 
     q19 If the 2004 presidential election were being held today and the
 candidates were John Kerry, the Democrat, and George W. Bush, the Republican,
 would you vote for John Kerry or George W. Bush? [CANDIDATES NAMES AND ANSWER
 CODES WILL ROTATE]
 
     John Kerry                    79      82     77
     George W.Bush                 10       9     10
     Other (Vol.)                   1       2      0
     Won't vote (Vol.)              1       0      1
     Depends (Vol.)                 2       1      3
     DK/NA                          7       6      8
 
     q20 Which of these comes closest to your feelings about John Kerry as the
 Democratic Party's nominee for President? -- 1. Angry, 2. Dissatisfied, but
 not angry, 3. Satisfied, but not enthusiastic, or 4. Enthusiastic.
 
     Angry                          1       1      1
     Dissatisfied, but not angry   10      12      7
     Satisfied, not enthusiastic   58      54     61
     Enthusiastic                  27      30     24
     DK/NA                          5       3      7
 
     q21 Which of these comes closest to your feelings about George W. Bush's
 administration? -- 1. Angry, 2. Dissatisfied, but not angry, 3. Satisfied, but
 not enthusiastic, or 4. Enthusiastic.
 
     Angry                         37      38     36
     Dissatisfied, but not angry   46      49     44
     Satisfied, not enthusiastic   11       7     14
     Enthusiastic                   3       4      2
     DK/NA                          2       1      3
 
     q22 Do you approve or disapprove of the way George W. Bush is handling his
 job as President?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Approve                       11      10     12
     Disapprove                    85      87     83
     DK/NA                          4       3      5
 
     q23 Do you feel things in this country are generally going in the right
 direction or do you feel things have pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong
 track?
 
     Right direction                6       5      6
     Wrong track                   92      92     92
     DK/NA                          2       3      2
 
     q24 Which ONE issue would you most like to hear the candidates for
 president discuss during the 2004 presidential campaign?
 
     Economy and Jobs              29      34     26
     War in Iraq                   21      21     21
     Health Care                   11       8     14
     Education                      6       3      8
     Medicare, Medicaid             3       2      3
     Defense / Military             2       2      1
     Terrorism (general)            2       3      0
     Poverty / Homelessness         2       2      2
     Social Security                1       2      1
     Drug coverage/Prescription     1       1      1
     Foreign Policy                 1       2      1
     Attention to Domestic affairs  1       1      1
     Religious Values               1       0      1
     Taxes/IRS                      1       2      1
     Gas/Heating Oil Crisis         1       1      1
     Gay/Same-Sex Marriage          1       1      1
     Security/Safety                1       2      1
     Other                          5       5      4
     DK/NA                         10       8     12
 
     q25 From what you have seen or heard, do you think either candidate is
 talking about that issue?  IF YES: Which candidate?
 
     Yes, Kerry is                 26      23     28
     Yes, Bush is                   9       9     10
     Yes, both are                 14      18     11
     No                            46      47     45
     DK/NA                          5       3      6
 
     q26 Do you think John Kerry has the same priorities for the country as you
 have, or not?
 
     Has                           64      70     59
     Does not have                 19      20     19
     DK/NA                         17      10     22
 
     q27 Do you think John Kerry is likely or not likely to tell you the truth?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Yes                           63      73     55
     No                            21      18     24
     DK/NA                         16       9     21
 
     q28 Would you be more likely to describe John Kerry as highly intelligent,
 or of only average intelligence?
 
     Highly intelligent            56      58     54
     Average intelligence          37      38     35
     Below average (vol.)           0       1      0
     DK/NA                          7       3     11
 
     q29 If John Kerry is elected President in November, do you think
 opportunities for black people in the U.S. will get better, get worse, or stay
 about the same?
 
     Get better                    47      52     43
     Get worse                      3       4      2
     Stay same                     45      40     49
     DK/NA                          5       4      6
 
     q30 Do you think George W. Bush has the same priorities for the country as
 you have, or not?
 
     Has                            9      11      8
     Does not have                 84      84     84
     DK/NA                          7       5      8
 
     q31 Do you think George W. Bush is likely or not likely to tell you the
 truth?
 
     Yes                           12      13     11
     No                            79      81     78
     DK/NA                          9       6     11
 
     q32 Would you be more likely to describe George W. Bush as highly
 intelligent, or of only average intelligence?
 
     Highly intelligent            21      20     22
     Average intelligence          67      71     63
     Below average (vol.)           6       5      7
     DK/NA                          6       4      8
 
     q33 Regardless of how you intend to vote, which candidate do you think
 would appoint more African-Americans to his Cabinet or other high-level
 positions, John Kerry or George W. Bush?
 
     Kerry                         66      67     65
     Bush                          16      18     14
     Neither (vol.)                 3       1      4
     Both equally (vol.)            2       3      2
     DK/NA                         13      11     15
 
 
     q34 Regardless of how you intend to vote, which candidate do you think has
 more soul -- John Kerry or George W. Bush?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     John Kerry                    64      68     61
     George W. Bush                11       9     12
     Both equally (vol.)            2       3      1
     Neither (vol.)                12      12     11
     DK/NA                         11       8     15
 
     q35 In election years, do you think the Democratic Party generally takes
 black voters for granted, or does the Democratic party generally try to reach
 out to black voters?
 
     Takes for granted             35      38     32
     Reaches out                   60      58     62
     DK/NA                          5       4      6
 
     q36 In election years, do you think the Republican Party generally ignores
 black voters, or does the Republican Party generally try to reach out to black
 voters?
 
     Ignores                       64      65     63
     Reaches out                   32      33     31
     DK/NA                          4       2      6
 
     q37 Do you think that a black candidate will receive the Democratic
 party's nomination for President within the next ten years?
 
     Yes                           40      37     42
     No                            53      57     50
     DK/NA                          7       6      8
 
     q38 Do you think that a black candidate will receive the Republican
 party's nomination for President within the next ten years?
 
     Yes                           18      14     20
     No                            78      83     74
     DK/NA                          4       3      6
 
     q39 Who do you feel is the most important national leader in the black
 community today?
 
     Jesse Jackson                 21      25     18
     Colin Powell                  13      15     11
     Al Sharpton                    4       5      3
     Kweisi Mfume                   3       3      2
     Louis Farrakhan                2       3      1
     Condoleezza Rice               2       1      2
     Oprah Winfrey                  1       0      1
     Bill Cosby                     1       1      1
     T.D. Jakes                     1       1      1
     Any other politician           2       4      1
     No one                         3       3      2
     Other                          4       4      6
     DK/NA                         43      33     51
 
 
     q40 Which of these issues would be the most important in getting you to
 vote in November?  1. Education; 2. Jobs and the economy; 3. Crime; 4. Illegal
 drugs; 5. The war in Iraq, 6. Health care, or something else?  IF SOMETHING
 ELSE, ASK:  What issue will be most important?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Education                     19      20     18
     Jobs and the economy          46      52     41
     Crime                          1       1      2
     Drugs                          2       1      2
     War in Iraq                   14      14     13
     Health care                   14      10     17
     Something else (SPECIFY)       3       2      3
     None of the above (vol.)       1       0      1
     DK/NA                          0       0      3
 
     q41 Now I would like to ask you some questions about various issues facing
 the country today.  Which one of the following do you think would do the most
 to provide African Americans with more jobs?  1. More government programs,
 such as job training and employment programs, to prepare people for work, or
 2. Using tax breaks or tax penalties to encourage businesses to hire more
 workers?
 
     More government programs      57      54     58
     Tax breaks for businesses     36      36     35
     Both (vol.)                    3       3      2
     Neither (vol.)                 3       5      2
     Something else (vol.)          1       1      1
     DK/NA                          0       1      2
 
     q42 Which ONE of the following would do the most to make sure African
 American children receive a good education?  1. Vouchers for children to
 attend private or religious schools; or 2. More government money going
 directly to public schools; or 3. Changing the school district boundaries so
 that wealthy and poorer schools are combined?
 
     Vouchers                      10       8     12
     More government money         40      36     44
     Changing district boundaries  44      50     40
     All (vol.)                     2       3      1
     None (vol.)                    1       1      1
     Something else (vol.)          0       1      0
     DK/NA                          3       1      2
 
     q43 Which ONE of the following do you think would be the best way to help
 more African Americans go to college?  1. More financial assistance from the
 federal government to help pay for college, or 2. More spaces in college set
 aside specifically for African American students, or 3. Better college
 preparation in elementary and high school?
 
     More financial assistance     25      24     27
     More spaces for students       4       3      4
     Better college preparation    65      68     63
     All (vol.)                     4       4      4
     None (vol.)                    0       1      0
     Something else (vol.)          0       0      1
     DK/NA                          2       0      1
 
     q44 Which ONE of the following would do the most to solve the problem of
 crime and violence among youths in the black community?  1. Longer jail
 sentences for youths who break the law, or 2. Holding parents legally
 responsible for their children's actions, or 3. More community programs and
 activities for youths?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Longer/harsher jail sentences  6       4      8
     Holding parents responsible   18      20     17
     More community programs       70      70     70
     All (vol.)                     3       3      3
     None (vol.)                    1       0      1
     Something else (vol.)          1       1      1
     DK/NA                          1       2      0
 
     q45 Which ONE do you think would do the most to help get illegal drugs out
 of the black community?  1. More law enforcement crackdowns on drug dealers,
 or 2. More anti-drug education programs, or 3. More drug treatment programs to
 get users off drugs?
 
     Legal crackdowns              35      31     38
     More anti-drug programs       25      26     24
     More drug treatment programs  28      33     25
     All (vol.)                     4       3      5
     None (col.)                    3       2      4
     Something else (vol.)          3       3      3
     DK/NA                          2       2      1
 
     q46 What do you think should be the penalty for persons convicted of
 murder -- 1. the death penalty, 2. or life in prison with no chance of parole,
 or 3. a long prison sentence with a chance of parole?
 
     Death penalty                 18      19     17
     Life with no parole           44      39     49
     Long sentence with parole     25      32     19
     Depends (vol.)                 9       7     11
     DK/NA                          4       3      4
 
     q47 What do you think should happen to affirmative action programs  -- 1.
 Should they be ended now, or 2. Should they be phased out over the next few
 years, or 3. Should affirmative action programs be continued for the
 foreseeable future?
 
     Ended now                      3       4      3
     Phased out                    15      14     15
     Cont'd for forseeable future  76      82     72
     DK/NA                          6       0     10
 
     q48 Which comes closest to your view -- 1.Gay couples should be allowed to
 legally marry, or 2. Gay couples should be allowed to form civil unions but
 not legally marry, or 3. There should be no legal recognition of a gay
 couple's relationship.
 
     Should be allowed marry       21      24     20
     Allowed to form civil unions  22      20     22
     No legal recognition          53      53     54
     DK/NA                          4       3      4
 
     q49 Do you think the U.S. should or should not intervene when crises occur
 in Africa?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Should                        67      68     66
     Should not                    20      20     20
     It depends (vol.)              7       9      6
     DK/BA                          6       3      8
 
     q50 How much confidence do you have that your vote in November will be
 counted accurately -- a lot, some, not much, or no confidence your vote will
 be counted accurately?
 
     A lot                         41      46     37
     Some                          39      37     41
     Not much                      11      10     11
     No confidence                  6       4      8
     Won't vote (Vol.)              0       0      0
     DK/NA                          3       3      3
 
     q51 Will the voting problems reported in Florida in the 2000 presidential
 election make you more likely to vote in this year's presidential election,
 less likely to vote, or won't they make much difference in whether or not you
 vote?
 
     More likely                   51      50     52
     Less likely                    3       4      3
     No difference                 45      46     44
     DK/NA                          1       0      1
 
     q52 Do you think black voters will be less likely than whites to have
 their 2004 presidential election votes counted fairly, or not?
 
     Will be less likely           41      46     37
     Will not be less likely       47      45     49
     Depends on state (Vol.)        4       3      5
     DK/NA                          8       6      9
 
     q53 Do you think there probably is or probably is not a deliberate attempt
 by some people to prevent African Americans from voting or having their votes
 counted properly?
 
     Probably is                   68      69     66
     Probably is not               27      27     26
     DK/NA                          5       4      8
 
     q54 Do you favor or oppose reinstating the military draft to provide
 soldiers for the Iraq conflict?
 
     Favor                         15      17     14
     Oppose                        82      80     83
     DK/NA                          3       3      3
 
     q55 Do you think the result of the war with Iraq was worth the loss of
 American life and other costs of attacking Iraq, or not worth it?
 
     Worth it                       8       7      8
     Not worth it                  90      91     89
     DK/NA                          2       2      3
 
     q56 Do you or does any member of your immediate family now serve in the
 U.S. armed forces or in the U.S. reserves?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     No                            64      63     65
     Yes, self                      3       4      3
     Yes, other                    32      32     31
     Yes, self and other            1       0      1
     DK/NA                          0       1      0
 
     q57 How concerned are you that in the next 12 months you or someone else
 in your household might be out of work and looking for a job -- very
 concerned, somewhat concerned, or not at all concerned?
 
     Very concerned                50      51     49
     Somewhat concerned            23      21     24
     Not at all concerned          27      27     26
     DK/NA                          0       1      1
 
     q58  Would you say you attend religious services every week, almost every
 week, once or twice a month, a few times a year, or never?
 
     Every week                    41      35     45
     Almost every week             12      12     12
     Once or twice a month         19      18     20
     A few times a year            22      29     16
     Never                          6       6      6
     DK/NA                          0       0      1
 
     q59 Regardless of what you think about George W. Bush now, looking back to
 2000, would you say George W. Bush legitimately won the 2000 presidential
 election, or not?
 
     Legitimately won              11      11     11
     Did not win legitimately      85      87     83
     DK/NA                          4       2      6
 
     q60 How often would you say you vote -- always, nearly always, part of the
 time, or seldom?
 
     Always                        63      63     63
     Nearly always                 20      20     21
     Part of the time               9       9      9
     Seldom                         6       7      6
     Never (vol.)                   2       1      1
 
 
                              UNWEIGHTED   WEIGHTED
     Total Respondents            986
 
     Registered Voters            868        834
 
     Men Registered Voters        304        370
     Women Registered Voters      564        464
 
 

SOURCE BET (Black Entertainment Television); CBS News
    WASHINGTON, July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- In the most comprehensive election-
 year study of registered African-American voters ever by a news organization,
 a BET/CBS News poll shows support is still muted for presumed Democratic
 Presidential nominee Senator John Kerry (D-Massachusetts), while disdain for
 the policies of President George W. Bush and his administration is
 overwhelming.  The poll was conducted by the CBS News Election and Survey Unit
 using a series of questions developed by BET NIGHTLY NEWS and BET.com, the
 country's leading Internet platform for African Americans and a subsidiary of
 BET.  The findings were jointly released today by both organizations.
     While the trending of some sentiment among the nearly 1,000 African
 Americans surveyed was not surprising, other results point to mistrust of the
 overall voting process that stems from the controversial ending to the 2000
 Presidential Election.  Further revelations identify jobs and the economy as
 the most important issues to get African Americans to the polls in November;
 while a whopping nine in ten persons surveyed feel that the war in Iraq has
 not been worth the financial and human sacrifice.  There is also strong
 opinion that the United States is headed in the wrong policy direction under
 Bush's leadership.
     "These data points are of historic significance not only for the
 comprehensive nature of the survey, but also for the issues clearly identified
 for both Democrats and Republicans to note as the elections draw closer," said
 Pamela Gentry, BET NIGHTLY NEWS Washington Bureau Chief and Senior Producer.
 "There are some clear warning signs that the Democrats should heed, and not
 assume rampant support from African Americans in November based simply on
 traditional voting patterns.  While we found a nearly 8-to-1 margin in favor
 of Senator Kerry over President Bush, the respondents have not found the Kerry
 platform overly impressive."
     "Republicans should also pay attention to the fact that in spite of their
 outreach efforts, there's still a feeling among African Americans that they're
 being largely ignored by the GOP," Gentry added.
     "It is rare in an election year that we have the opportunity to focus on
 this important group of voters, and this collaboration with BET helps us
 understand the intensity and complexity of feelings that explain the more
 unusual poll findings about African Americans," said Kathleen Frankovic,
 Director of Surveys and Producer for CBS News.
     The survey, conducted by the CBS News Election and Survey Unit, comprised
 telephone calls with 986 African Americans.  Executives with BET.com sought to
 be diverse in the questioning as well as comprehensive in the approach.
     "African Americans as a whole will not shy away from sharing opinions when
 approached in the right manner," said Ed Wiley III, Managing Editor for
 BET.com.  "It was important not only to gauge the direction that these
 registered voters were leaning in their thoughts about the November election,
 but also to probe a range of issues relevant to African-American community
 overall.  That's why the survey data includes opinions on such topics as
 affirmative action, youth crime, gay marriage, education and the crisis on the
 continent of Africa."
     BET NIGHTLY NEWS and BET.com will use the findings and analysis from the
 poll as the basis for their coverage of the Democratic National Convention in
 Boston beginning Monday, July 26.  Each night throughout the convention, BET
 NIGHTLY NEWS will share with viewers not only the major convention news of the
 day, but also offer an inside look at the speakers, delegates and political
 process as the DNC formally nominates Senator Kerry and running mate Senator
 John Edwards (D-North Carolina) as its ticket for the November general
 election.  BET News anchor Jacque Reid will pilot each night's coverage,
 backed by a host of reporters, analysts, opinion leaders and celebrity guests.
 BET will shift its election focus to New York starting August 30 for gavel-to-
 gavel coverage of the Republican National Convention.  BET NIGHTLY NEWS
 televises Monday through Friday at 11 p.m. ET/PT.  Heather Vincent is the
 Executive Producer.
     CBS News conducted telephone interviews on behalf of BET with 986 African-
 American adults between July 6-15, 2004, of which 868 were registered to vote.
 The sample of respondents came from households where an African-American adult
 had previously been interviewed for CBS News polls.  The error due to sampling
 could be plus or minus three percentage points for results based on the entire
 sample.  Additional methodological information can be found with the complete
 poll results at http://www.cbsnews.com and http://www.bet.com.
 
     Complete results of the BET/CBS News Poll are below.
 
     ABOUT BET.COM
     BET Interactive's signature offering BET.com is the country's leading on-
 line media platform for African Americans.  Averaging over 5.7 million
 visitors per month, BET.com has received numerous accolades for its content
 and community applications including awards from the National Association of
 Black Journalists, Scripps-Howard Media, Interactive Design magazine and Black
 Enterprise.  BET Interactive is a division of Viacom (NYSE:   VIA; VIA.B)  and a
 subsidiary BET, the nation's leading television network providing quality
 entertainment, music, news and public affairs programming for the African-
 American audience.  The BET Network reaches more than 78 million households
 according to Nielsen Media Research, and can be seen in the United States,
 Canada and the Caribbean.
 
     ABOUT CBS NEWS
     The CBS News Division operates a worldwide news organization serving the
 CBS Television and Radio Networks with regularly scheduled news and public
 affairs broadcasts -- including, among others, the CBS EVENING NEWS WITH DAN
 RATHER, THE EARLY SHOW, 60 MINUTES, 60 MINUTES II, 48 HOURS, FACE THE NATION
 and SUNDAY MORNING -- and special reports on breaking news.  The division
 maintains 18 news bureaus and offices in the United States and abroad in
 addition to its world headquarters in New York.
 
     Visit Us @ http://www.BET.com
 
 
 
                   2004 BET/CBS News Poll - Executive Summary
 
     Here are some highlights from the 2004 BET/CBS News Poll of African
 American voters:
 
     * While many observers talk of political polarization in the U.S. this
 election year, the African American community is unified on key measures: nine
 in ten think the country is headed in the wrong direction, and nine in ten
 think the war in Iraq was not worth the costs.
 
     * Senator John Kerry leads President George W. Bush by a wide margin of 8
 to 1 among African American voters.  But these voters have yet to feel a great
 deal of enthusiasm about their candidate this year; most are just "satisfied"
 having Kerry atop the ticket.
 
     * African American voters express widespread negative views of President
 Bush.  But this is not much different from black voters' views of George H.W.
 Bush or Ronald Reagan when they were president.
 
     * The number one policy issue -- by a wide margin -- that could mobilize
 African American voters this year is the economy and jobs.  Job insecurity is
 no doubt part of the problem; compared to voters overall, more black voters
 are concerned about losing a job. And these voters think the way to provide
 more jobs for African Americans is through government training and employment
 programs.
 
     * Strong resentment remains over the 2000 election -- but it is fueling
 motivation to get back to the polls in 2004, and right the wrongs that
 African-Americans believe took place. Most are more motivated to get to the
 polls this year because of Florida 2000. More than 4 in 5 believe Bush did not
 legitimately win the election, and two thirds think there are deliberate
 attempts made to prevent black voters' votes from being counted.
 
     * African Americans generally feel the Democratic Party reaches out to
 them, though about one-third believe the party takes black voters for granted.
 However, the majority of African American voters say they are ignored entirely
 by the GOP.
 
     * African Americans are somewhat more conservative on the issue of same
 sex marriage than the nation's voters as a whole. Most believe there should be
 no legal recognition -- neither marriage nor civil unions -- for same sex
 couples.
 
     * Few African Americans see school vouchers as the primary way to improve
 education opportunities; most would prefer to see more money spent on public
 schools, or new districts drawn.
 
     * African Americans believe that better preparation at the elementary
 school level -- and not more spaces set aside in the admissions process --
 would do the most to ensure that more African Americans go to college.
 
     * African Americans overwhelmingly back more community programs -- and not
 harsher jail terms -- as the best way to address the problem of youth crime.
 
 
 
                      AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE 2004 VOTE
                               July 6 - 15, 2004
 
     This BET/CBS News Poll confirms that African American voters are
 continuing in their traditional Democratic voting patterns: by a wide 8 to 1
 margin, Senator John Kerry leads President George W. Bush among black voters.
 But African American voters are not yet enthusiastic about the Democratic
 candidate, nor do they think he is as yet talking about the issues that matter
 to them -- but most like and trust him.
     African Americans' strong dislike of incumbent President George W. Bush is
 one important factor in their vote choice.  But so is the memory of the
 disputed Florida 2000 election and that controversy is also a cause of deep
 suspicion. Most African American voters say President Bush did not win the
 2000 election legitimately, and for some, the events of 2000 have given them
 additional motivation to turn out this year.  At the same time many black
 voters worry that there will be deliberate efforts to discount their votes
 this November.
 
     LOOKING AHEAD TO THE 2004 ELECTION
     Not surprisingly, Democrat John Kerry leads President George W. Bush by a
 margin of about 8 to 1 among African American voters in a heads-up matchup.
 African Americans have historically supported Democratic candidates by large
 margins; in 2000, 90% of black voters cast their ballot for Al Gore, and 9%
 voted for George W. Bush.  Fewer than one in ten don't yet know who they will
 support. Voters as a whole give the ticket of Kerry and Senator John Edwards a
 five-point edge over the Bush-Cheney ticket in the most recent CBS News/New
 York Times poll of July 11-15.
 
                       KERRY VS. BUSH: CHOICE IN NOVEMBER
                              (Registered voters)
                        African Americans      All voters*
     John Kerry                79%                49%
     George Bush               10                 44
 
     *Comparison is to Kerry/Edwards ticket vs. Bush/Cheney ticket
 
     Unlike voters as a whole, black voters are nearly united in their support
 for Kerry.  There are only minor differences among various age, education, and
 income levels, by gender, or by region of the country.
     Three quarters of black voters identify themselves as Democrats.  A few
 say they are Republicans, and 21% are Independents. Voters nationally are more
 closely divided between Democrats and Republicans. 38% say they are Democrats
 today, 31% Republicans, and 31% Independent in the latest CBS News/New York
 Times Poll. Black voters who are Independents are firmly in Kerry's camp; 59%
 support Kerry, and 18% support Bush (Independents are a swing group among all
 voters).
 
     EXPECTATIONS FOR THE 2004 VOTE
     African American voters say they are more engaged in this election than
 they were at this time in 2000.  37% report they are paying a lot of attention
 to the campaign, and another 40% are paying some attention.  At this point in
 the 2000 campaign, just 16% of African American voters were paying a lot of
 attention.
 
                             ATTENTION TO CAMPAIGN
                              (Registered voters)
                                    Now      7/2000
               A lot                37%       16%
               Some                 40        47
               Not much             19        27
               Not at all            5         9
 
     In addition, more voters are likely now than in 2000 to say they will
 definitely vote in November.  83% of African American voters say they will
 definitely vote; in 2000, 71% said the same.  What potential voters say they
 will do in July may not reflect what actually happens in November.
     The events of 2000 are clearly a motivating factor.  The final 2000
 results are still being questioned by almost all African American voters: 85%
 say that George W. Bush did not legitimately win the Presidency in 2000. This
 belief is far more widespread than among whites: asked in March of this year,
 32% of whites say that Bush did not win legitimately.
 
                       DID BUSH LEGITIMATELY WIN IN 2000?
                              (Registered voters)
                      African Americans        Whites
                           (Now)               (3/2004)
            Yes             11%                  63%
            No              85                   32
 
     Half of black voters say they are more likely to turn out this year
 because of the controversial events in Florida in 2000. Many black voters
 claimed they were denied the vote in Florida then; but now, hardly any black
 voters say that would dissuade them from voting in 2004.
 
                 HAVE THE EVENTS OF FLORIDA 2000 MADE YOU ... ?
                 More likely to vote in 2004             51%
                 Less likely to vote in 2004              3
                 Make no difference in '04 voting        45
 
     Yet while they may be eager to get back to the polls in 2004, some black
 voters are suspicious about what may happen there. Less than half - 41% - have
 a lot of confidence that their votes will be counted properly in November. 39%
 have some confidence, while 17% have little confidence.
 
          HOW MUCH CONFIDENCE THAT YOUR VOTE WILL BE COUNTED IN 2004?
                              (Registered voters)
                   A lot              41%
                   Some               39
                   Not much/none      17
 
     The mistrust that lingers coincides with a widespread belief that people
 do make deliberate attempts to either thwart African American attempts to
 vote, or to miscount the ballots once cast. Fully two-thirds of African
 Americans believe such malicious attempts are made against African Americans.
 
       ARE THERE DELIBERATE ATTEMPTS TO DISRUPT AFRICAN AMERICAN VOTING?
                              (Registered voters)
                    Yes        68%
                    No         27
 
     In addition, four in ten black voters feel that they are less likely than
 white voters to have their votes correctly tabulated, nearly as many as think
 their votes are as likely to be correctly counted.
 
                 COMPARED TO WHITES, BLACKS IN 2004 WILL BE ...
                              (Registered voters)
           Less likely to have votes counted           41%
           Just as likely to have votes counted        47
 
     VIEWS OF THE CANDIDATES
     Despite their overwhelming support for him, African American voters don't
 yet feel much excitement about John Kerry.   Although 27% say they are
 "enthusiastic" about Kerry's candidacy, more than twice as many, 58%, say they
 are merely "satisfied."
 
                         FEEL ABOUT KERRY'S CANDIDACY:
                              (Registered voters)
                         Enthusiastic             27%
                         Satisfied                58
                         Dissatisfied             10
                         Angry                     1
 
     While they might not be energized by him, these voters do have positive
 views of the Democratic candidate.  Majorities think Kerry has the same
 priorities for the country as they do, is likely to tell them the truth, and
 is highly intelligent.
 
                              VIEWS OF JOHN KERRY
                              (Registered voters)
                                              Yes      No
           Shares your priorities             64%      19
           Likely to tell you the truth       63%      21
 
                               JOHN KERRY IS ...
                              (Registered voters)
                  Highly intelligent             56%
                  Of average intelligence        37
 
     There is some optimism about a Kerry Administration's impact on the lives
 of African Americans, though just as many are likely to expect not much to
 change if he is elected.  Just under half think opportunities for blacks will
 improve if Kerry is elected president.  About as many think there won't be any
 difference.  Hardly any, however, think things will get worse.
 
              IF KERRY IS ELECTED, OPPORTUNITIES FOR BLACKS WILL:
                              (Registered voters)
                Get better          47%
                Stay the same       45
                Get worse            3
 
     Blacks also think Kerry would appoint more African Americans to cabinet
 positions than Bush - despite Bush's very visible appointments of African
 Americans to his Cabinet.
 
            WHO WOULD APPOINT MORE AFRICAN AMERICAN CABINET MEMBERS?
                              (Registered voters)
                     John Kerry          66%
                     George W. Bush      16
                     Both equally         2
                     Neither              3
 
     Black voters may simply have an easier time relating to John Kerry than to
 George W. Bush.  When asked to choose between the two candidates, by a large
 margin black voters even think John Kerry has more soul than George W. Bush.
 
                               WHO HAS MORE SOUL?
                              (Registered voters)
                     John Kerry          64%
                     George W. Bush      11
                     Both equally         2
                     Neither             12
 
     African Americans want to hear both Bush and Kerry talk about the economy,
 jobs and healthcare this year. 29% volunteer the economy or jobs as the top
 issue they want the candidates to discuss, and another 11% name health care.
 21% cite the war in Iraq. And although many African Americans live in urban
 areas that may be more vulnerable to terror attacks, only 2% name terrorism as
 the main issue.
     However, many black voters do not feel either candidate is addressing
 these issues. 46% of those who named an issue think neither Kerry nor Bush is
 talking about it.
 
                 ARE THE CANDIDATES DISCUSSING YOUR TOP ISSUE?
                              (Registered voters)
                 Yes, Kerry is         26%
                 Yes, Bush is           9
                 Yes, both are         14
                 No, neither is        46
 
     BUSH'S WEAKNESSES
     From a low job approval rating to expressions of frustration and even
 anger with the Administration, President George W. Bush receives very little
 support from African American voters in this poll.
     His job approval rating from this group is extremely low; just 11%
 approve, and 85% disapprove.
 
                           BUSH'S JOB APPROVAL RATING
                              (Registered voters)
                    Approve            11%
                    Disapprove         85
 
     Nearly half of black voters are dissatisfied with the administration, and
 over a third say they are angry.
 
                       FEEL ABOUT BUSH'S ADMINISTRATION:
                              (Registered voters)
                Enthusiastic         3%
                Satisfied           11
                Dissatisfied        46
                Angry               37
 
     George W. Bush has never been popular with black voters.  Few approved of
 the job he was doing in the months immediately after he took office.  His job
 approval rating rose among blacks just after the September 11th terrorist
 attacks, as it did among all Americans, but since then it has steadily
 declined.
     George W. Bush is not the only Republican president to be so disliked by
 African American voters.  In the summer of 1992, only one in five black voters
 approved of the job President George H. W. Bush was doing.  In 1988 and 1984,
 President Ronald Reagan's job approval ratings were similarly low.  Still, the
 current president's job approval ratings are even lower than either his
 father's or Reagan's.
     Most black voters think Bush does not share their priorities for the
 country, and is not likely to tell them the truth.  They say he is of average,
 not high, intelligence.
 
                            VIEWS OF GEORGE W. BUSH
                              (Registered voters)
                                              Yes       No
             Shares your priorities            9%       84
             Likely to tell you the truth     12%       79
 
 
                             GEORGE W. BUSH IS ...
                              (Registered voters)
           Highly intelligent            21%
           Of average intelligence       67
 
     THE POLITICAL PARTIES
     The vast majority of African Americans consider themselves Democrats.
 Most say the Democratic party generally tries to reach out to them, although
 about one third - 35% - of African American voters feel that the Democratic
 party takes them for granted. Most African American voters who consider
 themselves Independents believe that the black vote is taken for granted by
 the Democrats, suggesting why they might not declare allegiance to that party.
 
                        DOES THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY ... ?
                              (Registered voters)
                                            All       Independents
     Reach out to black voters              60%            42%
     Take black voters for granted          35             49
 
     Only a handful of African Americans identify themselves as Republicans,
 and most black voters believe that the GOP generally does not try very much to
 change that.  64% say the Republican party ignores the black vote instead of
 reaching out to try to gain some of it; one-third says the GOP does make
 efforts.
 
                        DOES THE REPUBLICAN PARTY ... ?
                              (Registered voters)
     Ignore black voters                64%
     Reach out to black voters          32
 
     There is little expectation that either party will place an African
 American atop its Presidential ticket any time soon. Most - 53% - do not
 believe that a black candidate will win the Democratic party's Presidential
 nomination within the next ten years. This is a very different outlook from
 twenty years ago: in the summer of 1984, as the Reverend Jesse Jackson made
 his first run at the Democratic Party's Presidential nod, 72% of black voters
 -- and 77% of all voters -- believed that an African American would secure a
 Democratic party nomination within thirty years (in essence, by the 2012
 election.)
 
             WILL AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WIN THE DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION
                               WITHIN TEN YEARS?
                              (Registered voters)
                                               1984: Win nomination
                          Now                   within 30 years?
           Yes            40%                        72%
           No             53                         15
 
     Despite the fact that the GOP boasts nationally prominent figures such as
 Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice
 within its ranks, few African American voters foresee any African American
 candidate winning the Republican nomination within ten years; just 18% think
 that will happen.
 
             WILL AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WIN THE REPUBLICAN NOMINATION
                               WITHIN TEN YEARS?
                              (Registered voters)
                     Yes            18%
                     No             78
 
     LEADERSHIP AND THE NATION'S DIRECTION
     Twenty years after his first bid for the presidency, the Reverend Jesse
 Jackson remains atop the list of important national leaders of the African
 American community. Jackson's name was volunteered by 21% of black voters
 asked to name the most important national African American leader, ahead of
 Secretary of State Colin Powell at 13%. Jackson was first among both older and
 younger respondents. The Reverend Al Sharpton, who recently ran for the
 Democratic nomination, was far behind at 4%. Condoleezza Rice was the only
 woman mentioned by more than 1%.  But almost half of all voters could not name
 anyone.
 
                MOST IMPORTANT NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN LEADER?
                              (Registered voters)
                Jesse Jackson            21%
                Colin Powell             13
                Al Sharpton               4
                Kweisi Mfume              3
                Louis Farrakhan           2
                Condoleezza Rice          2
                Don't know/No one        46
 
     A majority of registered voters nationwide think things in this country
 are off on the wrong track, and African American voters are even more
 pessimistic. Nearly all -- 92% -- of African American voters say things in
 this country have pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong track; just 6% say
 things are headed in the right direction.
 
                              DIRECTION OF COUNTRY
                              (Registered voters)
                              African Americans        All (7/2004)
          Right direction            6%                    38%
          Wrong track               92                     55
 
     THE IMPORTANT ISSUES: THE ECONOMY AND IRAQ
     African American voters, like many Americans, are concerned about the
 economy and jobs in this election campaign. They also do not think the war in
 Iraq was worth the costs.
 
     The Economy
     The economy and jobs appear to be the critical issue for many African
 American voters.  46% say this issue will be the most important in getting
 them to vote in November. Jobs and the economy are followed by education with
 19%, the war in Iraq with 14%, and health care with 14%.
 
             WHICH ISSUE WOULD BE MOST IMPORTANT IN GETTING YOU TO
                               VOTE IN NOVEMBER?
                              (Registered voters)
         Jobs and the economy           46%
         Education                      19
         War in Iraq                    14
         Health care                    14
         Drugs                           2
         Crime                           1
 
     Job security -- or at least the perception of it -- is lower among African
 American voters than among voters as a whole.  50% of African-American voters
 are very concerned that they or someone in their household may be out of work
 in the next 12 months, compared to 31% of all voters.  An additional 23% are
 somewhat concerned about losing their job.
 
                  CONCERNED YOU OR SOMEONE IN HOUSEHOLD MAY BE
                          OUT OF WORK IN THE NEXT YEAR
                              (Registered voters)
                             African Americans         All (5/2004)
     Very concerned                 50%                    31%
     Somewhat concerned             23                     29
     Not at all concerned           27                     40
 
     As for which would be a better remedy for providing more jobs to African
 Americans, 57% of black voters choose more government programs that provide
 job training and employment, while 36% choose giving tax incentives or tax
 breaks to encourage businesses to hire workers.
 
 
             WHICH WOULD PROVIDE AFRICAN AMERICANS WITH MORE JOBS?
                              (Registered voters)
             More government programs                 57%
             Tax breaks/incentives for businesses     36
 
     The War in Iraq
     African American voters clearly do not think the war in Iraq was worth the
 loss of life and other costs. Nine in 10 do not think the war in Iraq was
 worth it; just 8% say it was.
     While a majority of voters overall think that the Iraq war was not worth
 the costs, that feeling is less pervasive than it is among African Americans.
 59% of voters overall in a July CBS News/New York Times Poll said the war was
 not worth the costs.
 
                           WAS IRAQ WAR WORTH COSTS?
                              (Registered voters)
                                African Americans        All (7/2004)
                 Yes                   8%                   36%
                 No                   90                    59
 
      African American voters who have family members in the military are no
 more supportive of the Iraq war. 86% of black voters in military households
 say the war was not worth it.
     African Americans have strong ties to the military.  In this poll, 36% of
 African American voters are military family members - that is, either they
 themselves or an immediate family member is currently serving in the U.S.
 military. This number is higher among African Americans than it is among
 voters overall. In a CBS News/New York Times Poll conducted in July, 21% of
 voters nationwide said they were a military family member.
     African American voters, like voters nationwide, are overwhelmingly
 opposed to reinstating the military draft to provide soldiers for the Iraq
 conflict. 82% oppose the draft. Among Americans overall, 70% are opposed to
 it.
     While African American voters may not necessarily support America's
 involvement in Iraq, a large majority say the U.S. should intervene when
 crises occur in Africa. 67% say the U.S. should intervene, 20% say it should
 not, and 7% say it depends on the situation.
 
               SHOULD U.S. INTERVENE WHEN CRISES OCCUR IN AFRICA?
                              (Registered voters)
               Yes                          67%
               No                           20
               It depends (vol.)             7
 
     SOCIAL ISSUES:  SAME-SEX MARRIAGE, EDUCATION AND CRIME
     African American voters are both more conservative and more liberal than
 voters overall on domestic and social issues.   When it comes to education,
 jobs and illegal drugs, African American voters largely support government
 programs to help with these concerns.
     Traditionally, African Americans have been strong supporters of a
 government that provides many services. In November 2003, 69% of African
 American voters said they preferred a bigger government providing more
 services, while just 40% of voters nationwide agreed.
     On one issue, black voters take a more conservative position than the
 public overall -- same sex marriage.
 
     Same-Sex Marriage
     More than half (53%) of African American voters think there should be no
 legal recognition of same-sex relationships.  Among voters overall, 39% share
 this view.
     43% of black voters support some type of legal recognition for same-sex
 couples; among all voters, 59% do.
 
                      SAME-SEX COUPLES SHOULD BE ALLOWED:
                              (Registered voters)
                             African-Americans      All (7/2004)
     To legally marry               21%                 26%
     To form civil unions           22                  33
     No legal recognition           53                  39
 
     Much of the objections are religious ones: among the most devoutly
 religious African Americans (those who attend church weekly), over seven in 10
 think there should be no legal recognition of same-sex relationships.
     Religion is extremely important to many black voters - more important than
 it is to voters overall.  41% of African American voters say they attend
 religious services every week, and an additional 12% say they attend almost
 every week.
     In a CBS News/New York Times poll conducted in June, 26% of voters
 nationwide said they attended religious services every week.
     There are some differences according to age and gender. Among African
 American voters, women are more likely than men to attend religious services
 each week; 45% of black women voters attend services each week, compared to
 35% of black voters who are men.  Older voters attend more frequently than
 younger ones.
 
                         ATTEND RELIGIOUS SERVICES  ...
                              (Registered voters)
                               African Americans       All (6/2004)
                                    All  Men  Women
      Every week                    41%  35%   45%          26%
      Almost every week             12   12    12           12
      Once or twice a month         19   18    20           12
      A few times a year            22   29    16           31
      Never                          6    6     6           18
 
     Education
     African American voters are somewhat divided as to what would do the most
 to make sure African American children receive a good education. 44% think
 changing school district boundaries so that wealthy and poorer schools are
 combined would do the most good, but almost as many - 40% - say more
 government aid sent directly to public schools would do the most.
     One proposal that most African American voters don't see as the best
 solution is school vouchers.  Just one in ten cite this as the best option.
 
            WHICH WOULD MAKE SURE AFRICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN RECEIVE
                               A GOOD EDUCATION?
                              (Registered voters)
            Changing district boundaries            44%
            More government money                   40
            Vouchers                                10
 
     Given a set of choices, blacks say some things would work better than
 quotas to get more African-Americans to attend college.  65% of African-
 American voters say better college preparation in elementary and high school
 would be the best way to help more African Americans attend college. 25% think
 more financial assistance from the federal government would be the best way.
 Only 4% cite more spaces in college set aside specifically for black students
 as the best way to help more African Americans go to college.
 
               WHICH WOULD BE BEST TO HELP MORE AFRICAN AMERICANS
                                 GO TO COLLEGE?
                              (Registered voters)
            Better college preparation             65%
            More financial assistance              25
            More spaces for black students          4
 
 
     Crime and Drugs
     By a wide margin, African American voters see more community programs and
 activities for young people as something that would most help to solve the
 problems of crime and violence among youths in the black community. Less than
 one in five say holding parents legally responsible for the actions of their
 children would help, while just 6% say longer and harsher jail sentences would
 do the most.
 
                    WHICH WOULD DO MOST TO SOLVE CRIME AMONG
                         YOUTHS IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY?
                              (Registered voters)
              More community programs              70%
              Holding parents responsible          18
              Longer jail sentences                 6
 
     While majorities of black voters across the board think more community
 programs for youth would help remedy crime and violence, older voters are more
 likely than younger ones to say parents need to be held more responsible for
 their children's actions.
     African American voters are tougher on the issue of illegal drugs.  More
 than a third thinks that more law enforcement crackdowns on drug dealers would
 do the most to help solve this problem.  But again, these voters place a great
 deal of faith in government programs; 28% think drug treatment programs and
 25% think drug education programs are the best bet.
 
                 WHICH WOULD DO MOST TO HELP GET ILLEGAL DRUGS
                          OUT OF THE BLACK COMMUNITY?
                              (Registered voters)
            Law enforcement crackdowns            35%
            More anti-drug programs               25
            More drug treatment programs          28
 
     Blacks differ from voters overall when it comes to support for the death
 penalty.  Most black voters in this poll oppose it. 44% of African American
 voters think a life sentence without parole should be the appropriate
 punishment for persons convicted of murder, while 25% prefer a long prison
 sentence with a chance of parole.  Just 18% support the death penalty for a
 convicted murderer. These views are in stark contrast to those of voters
 nationwide; in an August 2001 CBS News Poll, 44% of voters supported the death
 penalty for those convicted of murder.
 
                     WHAT SHOULD BE THE PENALTY FOR MURDER?
                              (Registered voters)
                                 African Americans      All (8/2001)
      Death penalty                     18%                 44%
      Life sentence with no parole      44%                 29
      Long sentence with parole         25                   8
 
     Affirmative Action
     Even though they say there are better means than quotas to ensure that
 more African-Americans attend college, African American voters strongly
 support affirmative action programs.   76% say such programs should be
 continued for the foreseeable future. 15% think affirmative actions programs
 should be phased out over the next few years, while only 3% think affirmative
 action should end now.
 
                   AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PROGRAMS SHOULD BE  ...
                              (Registered voters)
           Ended now                                     3%
           Phased over next few years                   15
           Continued for foreseeable future             76
 
     While African Americans support affirmative action programs across all
 demographic groups, black voters who describe themselves as conservative are
 more likely to say that affirmative action programs should be ended now or
 phased out. 27% of these conservatives express this view, compared to 18% of
 African American voters overall.
 
 
     METHODOLOGY
     Interviews were conducted among 986 African American adults by telephone.
 Interviews were conducted from July 6-15, 2004, by CBS News on behalf of BET.
 These respondents were part of nationwide representative samples identified in
 households previously interviewed by CBS News Polls.
 
     Weighting
     The sample is weighted to ensure that the distribution of interviews
 mirrors the distribution of the entire population of African-Americans across
 a variety of variables.
 
     The weighting procedures are as follows:
     1.  Each respondent receives a weight inversely proportional to his or her
         probability of selection. This weight is calculated by taking the
         HOUSEHOLD weight from the original source survey times the number of
         members in the household. (For the original adult surveys, weighting
         factors included the number of telephone voice lines in a household
         and respondent demographic characteristics matched to Census data on
         region, age, education, gender and race.)
 
     2.  The weights were then adjusted to match Census Bureau estimates of
         African Americans by sex, age, region of the country and education.
 
     Margin of Error
     The margin of error for this survey is plus or minus three percentage
 points for results based on the entire sample.  That means that 95 times out
 of a hundred, the results are within three percentage points of what they
 would be if the entire universe of African Americans were interviewed. The
 error for subgroups is larger.
 
     National Trend
     Included throughout this analysis are data from CBS News and CBS News/New
 York Times national polls of adults.
 
     Note
     Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
 
 
     q17 How much attention have you been able to pay to the 2004 Presidential
 campaign -- a lot, some, not much, or no attention so far?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %        %     %
     A lot                         37      44     31
     Some                          40      40     40
     Not much                      19      13     23
     No attention so far            5       3      7
     DK/NA                          0       0      0
 
     q18 How likely is it that you will vote in the 2004 election for President
 this November -- would you say you will definitely vote, probably vote,
 probably not vote, or definitely not vote in the election for President?
 
     Definitely vote               83      85     82
     Probably vote                 12      10     13
     Probably not vote              4       4      3
     Definitely not vote            1       1      2
     DK/NA                          0       0      0
 
     q19 If the 2004 presidential election were being held today and the
 candidates were John Kerry, the Democrat, and George W. Bush, the Republican,
 would you vote for John Kerry or George W. Bush? [CANDIDATES NAMES AND ANSWER
 CODES WILL ROTATE]
 
     John Kerry                    79      82     77
     George W.Bush                 10       9     10
     Other (Vol.)                   1       2      0
     Won't vote (Vol.)              1       0      1
     Depends (Vol.)                 2       1      3
     DK/NA                          7       6      8
 
     q20 Which of these comes closest to your feelings about John Kerry as the
 Democratic Party's nominee for President? -- 1. Angry, 2. Dissatisfied, but
 not angry, 3. Satisfied, but not enthusiastic, or 4. Enthusiastic.
 
     Angry                          1       1      1
     Dissatisfied, but not angry   10      12      7
     Satisfied, not enthusiastic   58      54     61
     Enthusiastic                  27      30     24
     DK/NA                          5       3      7
 
     q21 Which of these comes closest to your feelings about George W. Bush's
 administration? -- 1. Angry, 2. Dissatisfied, but not angry, 3. Satisfied, but
 not enthusiastic, or 4. Enthusiastic.
 
     Angry                         37      38     36
     Dissatisfied, but not angry   46      49     44
     Satisfied, not enthusiastic   11       7     14
     Enthusiastic                   3       4      2
     DK/NA                          2       1      3
 
     q22 Do you approve or disapprove of the way George W. Bush is handling his
 job as President?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Approve                       11      10     12
     Disapprove                    85      87     83
     DK/NA                          4       3      5
 
     q23 Do you feel things in this country are generally going in the right
 direction or do you feel things have pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong
 track?
 
     Right direction                6       5      6
     Wrong track                   92      92     92
     DK/NA                          2       3      2
 
     q24 Which ONE issue would you most like to hear the candidates for
 president discuss during the 2004 presidential campaign?
 
     Economy and Jobs              29      34     26
     War in Iraq                   21      21     21
     Health Care                   11       8     14
     Education                      6       3      8
     Medicare, Medicaid             3       2      3
     Defense / Military             2       2      1
     Terrorism (general)            2       3      0
     Poverty / Homelessness         2       2      2
     Social Security                1       2      1
     Drug coverage/Prescription     1       1      1
     Foreign Policy                 1       2      1
     Attention to Domestic affairs  1       1      1
     Religious Values               1       0      1
     Taxes/IRS                      1       2      1
     Gas/Heating Oil Crisis         1       1      1
     Gay/Same-Sex Marriage          1       1      1
     Security/Safety                1       2      1
     Other                          5       5      4
     DK/NA                         10       8     12
 
     q25 From what you have seen or heard, do you think either candidate is
 talking about that issue?  IF YES: Which candidate?
 
     Yes, Kerry is                 26      23     28
     Yes, Bush is                   9       9     10
     Yes, both are                 14      18     11
     No                            46      47     45
     DK/NA                          5       3      6
 
     q26 Do you think John Kerry has the same priorities for the country as you
 have, or not?
 
     Has                           64      70     59
     Does not have                 19      20     19
     DK/NA                         17      10     22
 
     q27 Do you think John Kerry is likely or not likely to tell you the truth?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Yes                           63      73     55
     No                            21      18     24
     DK/NA                         16       9     21
 
     q28 Would you be more likely to describe John Kerry as highly intelligent,
 or of only average intelligence?
 
     Highly intelligent            56      58     54
     Average intelligence          37      38     35
     Below average (vol.)           0       1      0
     DK/NA                          7       3     11
 
     q29 If John Kerry is elected President in November, do you think
 opportunities for black people in the U.S. will get better, get worse, or stay
 about the same?
 
     Get better                    47      52     43
     Get worse                      3       4      2
     Stay same                     45      40     49
     DK/NA                          5       4      6
 
     q30 Do you think George W. Bush has the same priorities for the country as
 you have, or not?
 
     Has                            9      11      8
     Does not have                 84      84     84
     DK/NA                          7       5      8
 
     q31 Do you think George W. Bush is likely or not likely to tell you the
 truth?
 
     Yes                           12      13     11
     No                            79      81     78
     DK/NA                          9       6     11
 
     q32 Would you be more likely to describe George W. Bush as highly
 intelligent, or of only average intelligence?
 
     Highly intelligent            21      20     22
     Average intelligence          67      71     63
     Below average (vol.)           6       5      7
     DK/NA                          6       4      8
 
     q33 Regardless of how you intend to vote, which candidate do you think
 would appoint more African-Americans to his Cabinet or other high-level
 positions, John Kerry or George W. Bush?
 
     Kerry                         66      67     65
     Bush                          16      18     14
     Neither (vol.)                 3       1      4
     Both equally (vol.)            2       3      2
     DK/NA                         13      11     15
 
 
     q34 Regardless of how you intend to vote, which candidate do you think has
 more soul -- John Kerry or George W. Bush?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     John Kerry                    64      68     61
     George W. Bush                11       9     12
     Both equally (vol.)            2       3      1
     Neither (vol.)                12      12     11
     DK/NA                         11       8     15
 
     q35 In election years, do you think the Democratic Party generally takes
 black voters for granted, or does the Democratic party generally try to reach
 out to black voters?
 
     Takes for granted             35      38     32
     Reaches out                   60      58     62
     DK/NA                          5       4      6
 
     q36 In election years, do you think the Republican Party generally ignores
 black voters, or does the Republican Party generally try to reach out to black
 voters?
 
     Ignores                       64      65     63
     Reaches out                   32      33     31
     DK/NA                          4       2      6
 
     q37 Do you think that a black candidate will receive the Democratic
 party's nomination for President within the next ten years?
 
     Yes                           40      37     42
     No                            53      57     50
     DK/NA                          7       6      8
 
     q38 Do you think that a black candidate will receive the Republican
 party's nomination for President within the next ten years?
 
     Yes                           18      14     20
     No                            78      83     74
     DK/NA                          4       3      6
 
     q39 Who do you feel is the most important national leader in the black
 community today?
 
     Jesse Jackson                 21      25     18
     Colin Powell                  13      15     11
     Al Sharpton                    4       5      3
     Kweisi Mfume                   3       3      2
     Louis Farrakhan                2       3      1
     Condoleezza Rice               2       1      2
     Oprah Winfrey                  1       0      1
     Bill Cosby                     1       1      1
     T.D. Jakes                     1       1      1
     Any other politician           2       4      1
     No one                         3       3      2
     Other                          4       4      6
     DK/NA                         43      33     51
 
 
     q40 Which of these issues would be the most important in getting you to
 vote in November?  1. Education; 2. Jobs and the economy; 3. Crime; 4. Illegal
 drugs; 5. The war in Iraq, 6. Health care, or something else?  IF SOMETHING
 ELSE, ASK:  What issue will be most important?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Education                     19      20     18
     Jobs and the economy          46      52     41
     Crime                          1       1      2
     Drugs                          2       1      2
     War in Iraq                   14      14     13
     Health care                   14      10     17
     Something else (SPECIFY)       3       2      3
     None of the above (vol.)       1       0      1
     DK/NA                          0       0      3
 
     q41 Now I would like to ask you some questions about various issues facing
 the country today.  Which one of the following do you think would do the most
 to provide African Americans with more jobs?  1. More government programs,
 such as job training and employment programs, to prepare people for work, or
 2. Using tax breaks or tax penalties to encourage businesses to hire more
 workers?
 
     More government programs      57      54     58
     Tax breaks for businesses     36      36     35
     Both (vol.)                    3       3      2
     Neither (vol.)                 3       5      2
     Something else (vol.)          1       1      1
     DK/NA                          0       1      2
 
     q42 Which ONE of the following would do the most to make sure African
 American children receive a good education?  1. Vouchers for children to
 attend private or religious schools; or 2. More government money going
 directly to public schools; or 3. Changing the school district boundaries so
 that wealthy and poorer schools are combined?
 
     Vouchers                      10       8     12
     More government money         40      36     44
     Changing district boundaries  44      50     40
     All (vol.)                     2       3      1
     None (vol.)                    1       1      1
     Something else (vol.)          0       1      0
     DK/NA                          3       1      2
 
     q43 Which ONE of the following do you think would be the best way to help
 more African Americans go to college?  1. More financial assistance from the
 federal government to help pay for college, or 2. More spaces in college set
 aside specifically for African American students, or 3. Better college
 preparation in elementary and high school?
 
     More financial assistance     25      24     27
     More spaces for students       4       3      4
     Better college preparation    65      68     63
     All (vol.)                     4       4      4
     None (vol.)                    0       1      0
     Something else (vol.)          0       0      1
     DK/NA                          2       0      1
 
     q44 Which ONE of the following would do the most to solve the problem of
 crime and violence among youths in the black community?  1. Longer jail
 sentences for youths who break the law, or 2. Holding parents legally
 responsible for their children's actions, or 3. More community programs and
 activities for youths?
 
                                 ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Longer/harsher jail sentences  6       4      8
     Holding parents responsible   18      20     17
     More community programs       70      70     70
     All (vol.)                     3       3      3
     None (vol.)                    1       0      1
     Something else (vol.)          1       1      1
     DK/NA                          1       2      0
 
     q45 Which ONE do you think would do the most to help get illegal drugs out
 of the black community?  1. More law enforcement crackdowns on drug dealers,
 or 2. More anti-drug education programs, or 3. More drug treatment programs to
 get users off drugs?
 
     Legal crackdowns              35      31     38
     More anti-drug programs       25      26     24
     More drug treatment programs  28      33     25
     All (vol.)                     4       3      5
     None (col.)                    3       2      4
     Something else (vol.)          3       3      3
     DK/NA                          2       2      1
 
     q46 What do you think should be the penalty for persons convicted of
 murder -- 1. the death penalty, 2. or life in prison with no chance of parole,
 or 3. a long prison sentence with a chance of parole?
 
     Death penalty                 18      19     17
     Life with no parole           44      39     49
     Long sentence with parole     25      32     19
     Depends (vol.)                 9       7     11
     DK/NA                          4       3      4
 
     q47 What do you think should happen to affirmative action programs  -- 1.
 Should they be ended now, or 2. Should they be phased out over the next few
 years, or 3. Should affirmative action programs be continued for the
 foreseeable future?
 
     Ended now                      3       4      3
     Phased out                    15      14     15
     Cont'd for forseeable future  76      82     72
     DK/NA                          6       0     10
 
     q48 Which comes closest to your view -- 1.Gay couples should be allowed to
 legally marry, or 2. Gay couples should be allowed to form civil unions but
 not legally marry, or 3. There should be no legal recognition of a gay
 couple's relationship.
 
     Should be allowed marry       21      24     20
     Allowed to form civil unions  22      20     22
     No legal recognition          53      53     54
     DK/NA                          4       3      4
 
     q49 Do you think the U.S. should or should not intervene when crises occur
 in Africa?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     Should                        67      68     66
     Should not                    20      20     20
     It depends (vol.)              7       9      6
     DK/BA                          6       3      8
 
     q50 How much confidence do you have that your vote in November will be
 counted accurately -- a lot, some, not much, or no confidence your vote will
 be counted accurately?
 
     A lot                         41      46     37
     Some                          39      37     41
     Not much                      11      10     11
     No confidence                  6       4      8
     Won't vote (Vol.)              0       0      0
     DK/NA                          3       3      3
 
     q51 Will the voting problems reported in Florida in the 2000 presidential
 election make you more likely to vote in this year's presidential election,
 less likely to vote, or won't they make much difference in whether or not you
 vote?
 
     More likely                   51      50     52
     Less likely                    3       4      3
     No difference                 45      46     44
     DK/NA                          1       0      1
 
     q52 Do you think black voters will be less likely than whites to have
 their 2004 presidential election votes counted fairly, or not?
 
     Will be less likely           41      46     37
     Will not be less likely       47      45     49
     Depends on state (Vol.)        4       3      5
     DK/NA                          8       6      9
 
     q53 Do you think there probably is or probably is not a deliberate attempt
 by some people to prevent African Americans from voting or having their votes
 counted properly?
 
     Probably is                   68      69     66
     Probably is not               27      27     26
     DK/NA                          5       4      8
 
     q54 Do you favor or oppose reinstating the military draft to provide
 soldiers for the Iraq conflict?
 
     Favor                         15      17     14
     Oppose                        82      80     83
     DK/NA                          3       3      3
 
     q55 Do you think the result of the war with Iraq was worth the loss of
 American life and other costs of attacking Iraq, or not worth it?
 
     Worth it                       8       7      8
     Not worth it                  90      91     89
     DK/NA                          2       2      3
 
     q56 Do you or does any member of your immediate family now serve in the
 U.S. armed forces or in the U.S. reserves?
 
                                ** REGISTERED VOTERS **
                                  Total    Men   Women
                                    %       %      %
     No                            64      63     65
     Yes, self                      3       4      3
     Yes, other                    32      32     31
     Yes, self and other            1       0      1
     DK/NA                          0       1      0
 
     q57 How concerned are you that in the next 12 months you or someone else
 in your household might be out of work and looking for a job -- very
 concerned, somewhat concerned, or not at all concerned?
 
     Very concerned                50      51     49
     Somewhat concerned            23      21     24
     Not at all concerned          27      27     26
     DK/NA                          0       1      1
 
     q58  Would you say you attend religious services every week, almost every
 week, once or twice a month, a few times a year, or never?
 
     Every week                    41      35     45
     Almost every week             12      12     12
     Once or twice a month         19      18     20
     A few times a year            22      29     16
     Never                          6       6      6
     DK/NA                          0       0      1
 
     q59 Regardless of what you think about George W. Bush now, looking back to
 2000, would you say George W. Bush legitimately won the 2000 presidential
 election, or not?
 
     Legitimately won              11      11     11
     Did not win legitimately      85      87     83
     DK/NA                          4       2      6
 
     q60 How often would you say you vote -- always, nearly always, part of the
 time, or seldom?
 
     Always                        63      63     63
     Nearly always                 20      20     21
     Part of the time               9       9      9
     Seldom                         6       7      6
     Never (vol.)                   2       1      1
 
 
                              UNWEIGHTED   WEIGHTED
     Total Respondents            986
 
     Registered Voters            868        834
 
     Men Registered Voters        304        370
     Women Registered Voters      564        464
 
 SOURCE  BET (Black Entertainment Television); CBS News