'Blue-Collar Blues' Hit The Midwest Chicago Tribune Reports

Apr 21, 2001, 01:00 ET from Chicago Tribune

    CHICAGO, April 21 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Over the past
 decade, Midwestern manufacturing employment rose 3.9 percent even as the
 number of manufacturing workers in the U.S. declined by 3.3 percent.  This
 places Midwestern manufacturing in a strange position.  While it has remained
 a strong area for manufacturing, the Midwest still faces difficulties,
 especially for unskilled workers.  The Chicago Tribune explores how the
 concentration of manufacturing in the Midwest has left the region vulnerable
 to economic downturns, in a three-story focus this Sunday, April 22.
     As a site for manufacturing, the Midwest has an edge over other regions,
 boasting a large and highly skilled pool of workers and a central location
 that serves as a hub for transportation.  Yet, in the current economic
 slowdown, the manufacturing sector shows vulnerabilities as layoffs help push
 the Illinois unemployment level to 5.3 percent.
     Clyde and Robert Lane experience firsthand this downturn in production.
 The Lanes' working lives are a window into the way technology, foreign
 competition and the changing demands of a fickle consumer market have
 transformed U.S. manufacturing.  Following peak earnings in the mid-1980s, the
 Lanes' incomes and benefits have steadily declined as they were forced to move
 from one job to the next.
     Sophia Beuc, a veteran business agent for District 8 of the Machinists
 Union, is often the bearer of bad news.  As the economy limps along, she, like
 many of her cohorts, has had to advise unions on how to weather the tough
 times.
     The three-stories of "Blue-Collar Blues" appear on the front page and in
 the Business section of the Sunday, April 22, Chicago Tribune, which is
 available in Chicago beginning Saturday morning.  The stories also are
 available on chicagotribune.com .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X01762886
 
 

SOURCE Chicago Tribune
    CHICAGO, April 21 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Over the past
 decade, Midwestern manufacturing employment rose 3.9 percent even as the
 number of manufacturing workers in the U.S. declined by 3.3 percent.  This
 places Midwestern manufacturing in a strange position.  While it has remained
 a strong area for manufacturing, the Midwest still faces difficulties,
 especially for unskilled workers.  The Chicago Tribune explores how the
 concentration of manufacturing in the Midwest has left the region vulnerable
 to economic downturns, in a three-story focus this Sunday, April 22.
     As a site for manufacturing, the Midwest has an edge over other regions,
 boasting a large and highly skilled pool of workers and a central location
 that serves as a hub for transportation.  Yet, in the current economic
 slowdown, the manufacturing sector shows vulnerabilities as layoffs help push
 the Illinois unemployment level to 5.3 percent.
     Clyde and Robert Lane experience firsthand this downturn in production.
 The Lanes' working lives are a window into the way technology, foreign
 competition and the changing demands of a fickle consumer market have
 transformed U.S. manufacturing.  Following peak earnings in the mid-1980s, the
 Lanes' incomes and benefits have steadily declined as they were forced to move
 from one job to the next.
     Sophia Beuc, a veteran business agent for District 8 of the Machinists
 Union, is often the bearer of bad news.  As the economy limps along, she, like
 many of her cohorts, has had to advise unions on how to weather the tough
 times.
     The three-stories of "Blue-Collar Blues" appear on the front page and in
 the Business section of the Sunday, April 22, Chicago Tribune, which is
 available in Chicago beginning Saturday morning.  The stories also are
 available on chicagotribune.com .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X01762886
 
 SOURCE  Chicago Tribune