Boeing Next-Generation 737-900 Receives FAA Approval

Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Boeing Company

    SEATTLE, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The newest and largest member of the
 Boeing (NYSE:   BA) 737 family, the Next-Generation 737-900, today earned type
 certification from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).  Validation
 by Europe's Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) is expected by Friday, April 20.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20001004/BOEINGLOGO )
     The certification formally recognizes that the 737-900 has passed the
 stringent design and testing requirements mandated by the FAA and JAA,
 clearing the airplane for passenger service.
     "This is an exciting day for Boeing and in particular the employees on the
 737 program," said Jon Robinson, program manager for the 737-900.  "This
 certification is a validation of the airplane's safety, reliability,
 performance and readiness to enter passenger service."
     The certification clears the way for the first 737-900 to be delivered to
 launch customer Seattle-based Alaska Airlines in mid-May.  Three other
 airlines, Continental, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and Korean Airlines, also have
 placed orders for the airplane.
     To receive certification, the 737-900 had to complete a flight-test
 program that began when the airplane made its first flight on Aug. 3, 2000.
 Over the course of eight months, the program's two flight-test airplanes
 completed 296 flights, 156 hours of ground testing and 649 hours of flight
 testing.
     "We are extremely proud of our newest 737-900 and its most recent
 milestone," said Carolyn Corvi, vice president and general manager of the
 737 program.  "As the 737-900 enters service, it marks the culmination of
 eight years of work and continues to make the 737 the best-selling airplane in
 the world."
     At 138 feet 2 inches (42.1 meters), the 737-900 is 8 feet 8 inches
 (2.6 meters) longer than the Next-Generation 737-800.  The airplane can carry
 up to 177 passengers in a two-class configuration, 15 more than the
 737-800, and 189 in a one-class configuration.  The extra capacity helps give
 the 737-900 the lowest operating costs per seat in its class.
     In addition to the 737-900 and 737-800, the Next-Generation 737 family
 consists of the 737-600 and 737-700.  The airplanes are designed to fly
 higher, faster, farther and quieter than previous 737 models and the
 competition.  The family of airplanes is the most advanced in its class with a
 new larger wing, an advanced flight deck featuring the latest large flat panel
 display technology, greater range and new engines with improvements in noise,
 fuel burn, thrust and maintenance cost.
     The 737 is the best selling commercial jetliner in history.  To date, more
 than 3,900 737s have been delivered to more than 200 customers.
 
 

SOURCE The Boeing Company
    SEATTLE, April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The newest and largest member of the
 Boeing (NYSE:   BA) 737 family, the Next-Generation 737-900, today earned type
 certification from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).  Validation
 by Europe's Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) is expected by Friday, April 20.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20001004/BOEINGLOGO )
     The certification formally recognizes that the 737-900 has passed the
 stringent design and testing requirements mandated by the FAA and JAA,
 clearing the airplane for passenger service.
     "This is an exciting day for Boeing and in particular the employees on the
 737 program," said Jon Robinson, program manager for the 737-900.  "This
 certification is a validation of the airplane's safety, reliability,
 performance and readiness to enter passenger service."
     The certification clears the way for the first 737-900 to be delivered to
 launch customer Seattle-based Alaska Airlines in mid-May.  Three other
 airlines, Continental, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and Korean Airlines, also have
 placed orders for the airplane.
     To receive certification, the 737-900 had to complete a flight-test
 program that began when the airplane made its first flight on Aug. 3, 2000.
 Over the course of eight months, the program's two flight-test airplanes
 completed 296 flights, 156 hours of ground testing and 649 hours of flight
 testing.
     "We are extremely proud of our newest 737-900 and its most recent
 milestone," said Carolyn Corvi, vice president and general manager of the
 737 program.  "As the 737-900 enters service, it marks the culmination of
 eight years of work and continues to make the 737 the best-selling airplane in
 the world."
     At 138 feet 2 inches (42.1 meters), the 737-900 is 8 feet 8 inches
 (2.6 meters) longer than the Next-Generation 737-800.  The airplane can carry
 up to 177 passengers in a two-class configuration, 15 more than the
 737-800, and 189 in a one-class configuration.  The extra capacity helps give
 the 737-900 the lowest operating costs per seat in its class.
     In addition to the 737-900 and 737-800, the Next-Generation 737 family
 consists of the 737-600 and 737-700.  The airplanes are designed to fly
 higher, faster, farther and quieter than previous 737 models and the
 competition.  The family of airplanes is the most advanced in its class with a
 new larger wing, an advanced flight deck featuring the latest large flat panel
 display technology, greater range and new engines with improvements in noise,
 fuel burn, thrust and maintenance cost.
     The 737 is the best selling commercial jetliner in history.  To date, more
 than 3,900 737s have been delivered to more than 200 customers.
 
 SOURCE  The Boeing Company

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