Booster Seats Effectiveness is Established: International Experts Gather To Close the Gap Between Science and Public Policy

Gaps in Child Passenger Safety Laws are Being Debated by Federal and State

Legislative Bodies Across the Country; Requiring Booster Seats

For 4- to 8-Year-Olds is at the Heart of Many Debates



Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    WASHINGTON, April 18 /PRNewswire/ --
 
      WHAT:              Booster Seats for Children
      WHEN:              Sessions: Monday, April 23, 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
                         Sessions: Tuesday, April 24, 8:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
                         Keynote Address: April 23, 11:50 a.m. (Senator
                         Fitzgerald, (R-IL)
                         Press Briefing: April 24, 1:30 p.m.
      WHERE:             Wyndham City Center Hotel
                         1143 New Hampshire Avenue
                         Washington, D.C.
      CONTACT:           Suzanne Hill, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
                         215-590-1417; as of 4/22 cell: 215-419-1094
 
     On April 23 and 24 international specialists on booster seats will convene
 in Washington, D.C. to review the current state of the art in child booster
 seat design, materials and child riding behavior, as well as to explore future
 directions to increase proper booster seat use among older children.  The
 conference is organized by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive
 Medicine.
     "The goal of the conference is to conclude with scientifically sound,
 realistic public policy priorities that can be implemented by organizations
 and agencies within the child passenger safety community and by government
 policy makers to increase proper booster seat use among children ages 4 to
 8 years," states Jeff Runge, an emergency physician and conference chairman.
     While the conference addresses the international implications related to
 booster seats for older children, the issue is particularly acute in the
 United States.
     The honorable Peter G. Fitzgerald (R-IL) will deliver the keynote address
 on Monday, April 23.  Senator Fitzgerald sponsored the Child Passenger
 Protection Act, which was signed into law by President Clinton as part of the
 TREAD Act in November, 2000.  The measure calls on the federal government to
 modernize outdated testing methods for child safety seats, expand efforts to
 protect children in various types of collisions and close the gap in occupant
 restraint laws that leaves older children not optimally restrained.
     Several dozen presentations by specialists from the USA, Canada, UK and
 Sweden will address a range of issues such as current use and misuse of
 booster seats; effectiveness of booster seats in real world crashes;
 behavioral factors affecting booster seat use; technical standards and
 regulations governing booster seats design; experimental research on injury
 tolerances of young children; and how booster seats are tested in the
 laboratory.  Recommendations will be made to further increase the benefits of
 booster seat use through design improvements and education.
     Booster Seats for Children: Closing the Gap Between Science and Public
 Policy conference is organized by the Association for the Advancement of
 Automotive Medicine.  Funding assistance has been provided by State Farm
 Insurance Companies, Volkswagen of America, and The Children's Hospital of
 Philadelphia.
     The Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM) is an
 international multidisciplinary organization of professionals committed to
 reducing motor vehicle trauma and improving highway safety.  AAAM was founded
 in 1957 as a non-profit organization.  It provides a communication forum for
 solutions to the traffic injury problem.  AAAM's membership incorporates
 clinical, research and policy making backgrounds to form a unique blend of
 leaders in traffic injury control.
 
 

SOURCE The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
    WASHINGTON, April 18 /PRNewswire/ --
 
      WHAT:              Booster Seats for Children
      WHEN:              Sessions: Monday, April 23, 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
                         Sessions: Tuesday, April 24, 8:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
                         Keynote Address: April 23, 11:50 a.m. (Senator
                         Fitzgerald, (R-IL)
                         Press Briefing: April 24, 1:30 p.m.
      WHERE:             Wyndham City Center Hotel
                         1143 New Hampshire Avenue
                         Washington, D.C.
      CONTACT:           Suzanne Hill, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
                         215-590-1417; as of 4/22 cell: 215-419-1094
 
     On April 23 and 24 international specialists on booster seats will convene
 in Washington, D.C. to review the current state of the art in child booster
 seat design, materials and child riding behavior, as well as to explore future
 directions to increase proper booster seat use among older children.  The
 conference is organized by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive
 Medicine.
     "The goal of the conference is to conclude with scientifically sound,
 realistic public policy priorities that can be implemented by organizations
 and agencies within the child passenger safety community and by government
 policy makers to increase proper booster seat use among children ages 4 to
 8 years," states Jeff Runge, an emergency physician and conference chairman.
     While the conference addresses the international implications related to
 booster seats for older children, the issue is particularly acute in the
 United States.
     The honorable Peter G. Fitzgerald (R-IL) will deliver the keynote address
 on Monday, April 23.  Senator Fitzgerald sponsored the Child Passenger
 Protection Act, which was signed into law by President Clinton as part of the
 TREAD Act in November, 2000.  The measure calls on the federal government to
 modernize outdated testing methods for child safety seats, expand efforts to
 protect children in various types of collisions and close the gap in occupant
 restraint laws that leaves older children not optimally restrained.
     Several dozen presentations by specialists from the USA, Canada, UK and
 Sweden will address a range of issues such as current use and misuse of
 booster seats; effectiveness of booster seats in real world crashes;
 behavioral factors affecting booster seat use; technical standards and
 regulations governing booster seats design; experimental research on injury
 tolerances of young children; and how booster seats are tested in the
 laboratory.  Recommendations will be made to further increase the benefits of
 booster seat use through design improvements and education.
     Booster Seats for Children: Closing the Gap Between Science and Public
 Policy conference is organized by the Association for the Advancement of
 Automotive Medicine.  Funding assistance has been provided by State Farm
 Insurance Companies, Volkswagen of America, and The Children's Hospital of
 Philadelphia.
     The Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM) is an
 international multidisciplinary organization of professionals committed to
 reducing motor vehicle trauma and improving highway safety.  AAAM was founded
 in 1957 as a non-profit organization.  It provides a communication forum for
 solutions to the traffic injury problem.  AAAM's membership incorporates
 clinical, research and policy making backgrounds to form a unique blend of
 leaders in traffic injury control.
 
 SOURCE  The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia